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Harnessing Interference For Faster Wireless Data

skylerweaver Re:What about secondary interference points? (91 comments)

According to the whitepaper, the coefficients to weight each transmitter signal to constructively interfere at your location sets up mathematically orthogonal channels (at lease orthogonal to some SNR, with some leakage from other channels depending on the number/location of devices and antennas).

The device can send a signal back which will interfere with other devices, but incoming signals at the antennas can be weighted by the same coefficients (or at least derived from the same) to again cancel all the other signals but your own.

Mathematically, the channel can go both ways with full bandwidth.

more than 3 years ago
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Invent the Medical Tricorder, Win $10,000,000

skylerweaver Re:better than a group of doctors?!?! (167 comments)

Actually, I find it interesting you used the Magic-8-Ball. While it is just a toy, the 20Q toy (which is somewhat similar in my mind) is very interesting because it tries to guess what you are thinking of by asking you yes/no/sometimes/don't-know questions. The neural net was then built by people playing the game and providing 'better questions' for when the AI got the answer wrong.

Could you not do the same for medical diagnosis?

[Do you have a headache?]
"No."
[Does your stomach hurt?]
"Yes."
[You have an ulcer?]
"No."
[What's wrong, and what would have been a better question?]
"Food poisoning, and 'Did you eat uncooked meat recently?'"
[Noted. Now I am smarter.]

It seems that you could make a diagnosis engine that as you rule things out it could come to as good a conclusion as a typical doctor.

more than 3 years ago
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No U.S. Government Shutdown This Week

skylerweaver anti-collaboration (385 comments)

One of the riders:

"Prohibits NASA from collaborating with China"

more than 3 years ago
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Fermi Lab May Have Discovered New Particle or Force

skylerweaver Re:Do they account for hypothesis-mining? (226 comments)

So I simulated your hypothetical experiment. I was going to use a 16 toss sequence, but it was going to take MATLAB 22 hours, so I only had it look for a 8 toss sequence.

A coin is tossed 1 million times. Then we count the total number of times each possible 8-toss sequence occurs. Turns out that each pattern shows up about the correct number of times. No pattern even comes close to showing up 1.1x more than expected. Let alone, 100x.

See here: http://i.imgur.com/5F391.png

Pattern number is just dec2bin, i.e., #0 -> TTTTTTTT and #10 -> TTTTHTHT, etc.

more than 3 years ago
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Accidental Find May Lead To a Cure For Baldness

skylerweaver Re:Uh, don't we maybe NEED that hormone? (404 comments)

BILLIONS of women mess around with their hormones every month just for being a human woman. I've had shoes thrown at me because of this. Once she started consciously messing with her hormones: no more shoe projectiles.

more than 3 years ago
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A New Class of Nuclear Reactors

skylerweaver Re:Um, don't safe reactors already exist? (560 comments)

According to TFA, a travelling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor.

http://www.terrapower.com/Technology/Timeline.aspx

more than 2 years ago
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Japan Earthquake May Have Shifted Earth's Axis

skylerweaver Re:Effect on GPS (253 comments)

BTW: GPS satellites are NOT in geo-synchronous orbit.

more than 3 years ago
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Japan Earthquake May Have Shifted Earth's Axis

skylerweaver GPS affected? (253 comments)

Many of the comments on here are "1.8 microseconds, oh no I get less sleep! What a stupid finding."

But seriously, does this have an effect on GPS? GPS satellites need to be corrected for relativistic effects that cause their clocks to tick 38 microseconds/day different than the ground; which would cause error to accumulate at 10km/day. Does 1.8 microsecond difference in our day cause error to accumulate in GPS at the rate of 0.5km/day if not fixed?

more than 3 years ago
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A Mind Made From Memristors

skylerweaver Re:Neuromorphic CPUs (320 comments)

Because power, delay, and area are correlated to the effective length of the transistor. You do want lower power in portable devices. You also want higher speed. You can get both if you decrease transistor area, which leads to increased density.

more than 3 years ago
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GPS Tracking Without a Warrant Declared Legal

skylerweaver Re:Why should I worry? (926 comments)

Ha, I thought you meant "Well they had a head start."

more than 4 years ago
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Bacteria From Beer Lasts 553 Days In Space

skylerweaver Re:Complication for mars missions? (138 comments)

I simulated 100 coin flips 1,000,000 times and plotted the percent occurrence for every # of heads:

http://imgur.com/iVLp9.jpg

It looks like about 8% chance to get 50/50 and better than 2% chance of getting either 40/60 or 60/40.

more than 4 years ago
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Airport Scanners Can Store and Transmit Images

skylerweaver Re:No duh (350 comments)

I can't wait for www.celebrityairportscannerpics.com

I mean, they all travel sometime ;)

more than 4 years ago
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New "Wet Computer" To Mimic Neurons In the Brain

skylerweaver Re:If anything comes of this... (132 comments)

If you still think that getting a computer to not only run a simulation but also generate all the random events that effect that simulation is still a plausible answer with computer technology today - I don't know how you arrived at that answer.

I merely only implied that it is possible to generate random numbers, which is very useful.

Perhaps you want to simulate something very specific and you know that the random part of the simulation has very specific characteristics (e.g. transient noise in SPICE), this is something that is easy to implement in software.

more than 4 years ago
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New "Wet Computer" To Mimic Neurons In the Brain

skylerweaver Re:If anything comes of this... (132 comments)

While pseudorandom number generators are deterministic (LFSR, etc), there is no reason that we can not implement a true random generator in hardware.

There are many ways to do this. For example, amplify the noise from a resistor, quantize it, and use the LSBs. These should be random.

more than 4 years ago
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Factorization of a 768-Bit RSA Modulus

skylerweaver Re:Meanwhile in Canada... (192 comments)

I am no expert in cryptography, but I remember my CS friends talking about 2 locks on a briefcase.

The shared key is encrypted with key A by Adam and sent to Betty (who can not open it without key A). Betty encrypts this with key B and sends it back to Adam. Adam decrypts this with key A and sends in back to Betty. Since the message now is only encrypted with key B, Betty can open it and get the shared key.

Or is this only a educational exercise and in actuality if you eavesdrop all of these transactions you can determine key A and B?

more than 4 years ago
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Framerates Matter

skylerweaver Re:The human eye can dectect 30 (521 comments)

With this I absolutely agree and I concede.

There will definately be vestigal stuff left over unless there is evolutionary pressure to remove it, and usually there isn't.

more than 4 years ago
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Framerates Matter

skylerweaver Re:The human eye can dectect 30 (521 comments)

By iteratively solving across the entire solution space and comparing this to the algorithm output.

For a class project, this is possible; however, I understand that you would truly apply optimization algorithms to problems in order to NOT iteratively solve them.

more than 4 years ago
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Framerates Matter

skylerweaver Re:The human eye can dectect 30 (521 comments)

Are you implying that the genetic algorithm doesn't find the global maximum?

optimize - to make as perfect, effective, or functional as possible

"As a general rule of thumb genetic algorithms might be useful in problem domains that have a complex fitness landscape as recombination is designed to move the population away from local optima that a traditional hill climbing algorithm might get stuck in." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_algorithm

While it is true that sexual crossover of genes will only optimize to the best solution available in the gene pool, mutation allows a global solution to be found. When I tested this algorithm myself, I specifically chose an over-constrained problem that had many local maxima and no clear "best-solution." The genetic algorithm then found the multiple "best" solutions and had 3 distinct gene groups, with the largest being the most fit according to the fitting function. So while the entire gene pool did not converge to a single maximum, it did find the global maxima.

more than 4 years ago
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Framerates Matter

skylerweaver Re:Any animator knows... (521 comments)

It would be an interesting experiment to make a webpage that presents you two equivalent flash movies with varying frame rates (as you described).

Have the two movies in a random order with a random frame rate (say, 12, 15, 24, 30, 45, 60, etc)

Then have the user merely select which looks "better/smoother."

It would be interesting (as you point out) to see at what frame rate there is no longer a clear winner.

more than 4 years ago

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