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Comments

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It's Easy To Hack Traffic Lights

sl149q Re:So when are we going to hear (135 comments)

This is really not much different from simply (for example) removing traffic signs.

I recall that some kids removed a stop sign as a prank, (Florida, mid 90's?) There was a bad accident and the result was a man slaughter charges and something like 20 year sentences.

yesterday
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It's Easy To Hack Traffic Lights

sl149q Re:people charge of traffic lights are engineers b (135 comments)

Well our local municipal engineering department obviously has not read that memo.

We have various lights that are always green and switch on demand when a car approaches on the side street.

I'll note that the counter argument is that people using those roads get used to them always being green, but also get used to them switching quickly to red when a car approaches from the side street.

yesterday
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

sl149q Re:Automation, remote controls already exist (239 comments)

We'll need some new laws that make using unmanned vehicles (cars, planes, quadracopters) to commit any crime an extra N years in jail.

4 days ago
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

sl149q Re:Will not matter. (239 comments)

And you would think that /. readers would understand the ramifications of Moores law (the general version...)

Current efforts are about the equivalent of the original iPhone. Sort of nice compared to what it replaced at the time. Laughable compared to what is available seven years later. But even today the current efforts are pretty good.

Get something into production and deployed, then five to eight years of scaling (software and hardware) and the cars of 2020 will be about as different from the current cars as the iPhone 6 is (will be in a month) from the original iPhone (both for hardware and software.)

4 days ago
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

sl149q Re:Will not matter. (239 comments)

"So no. No company would take that risk. And anyone stupid enough to try would not write perfect code and would be sued out of existence after their first patch."

There are two options. Do it here (where here is wherever you live...) by convincing YOUR government to set up the appropriate legal standards. Or let it get done elsewhere (hmm, Singapore, China, Taiwan, Korea) where the government will simply make a decision and mandate that as long as the cars have insurance there WILL BE NO LAWSUITS...

With option A, your town, city, state/province may reap some of the early benefits (aka jobs, profitable local businesses, safer roads sooner). With option B, you'll end up buying cars designed, tested and built elsewhere once they have proved to be reliable and useful (so fewer local jobs and businesses and you get to live with unsafe vehicles longer so more people dead or injured.)

It will happen. It might not happen where you live until somebody else has figured out how to profitably do it.

4 days ago
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

sl149q Re:Insurance rates (239 comments)

It may end up with government run no fault insurance, possibly funded by (for example) fuel taxes (drive more, higher risk, pay more.)

If you are in an accident, you are covered. Since, in theory (if all the vehicles are autonomous) there IS no fault, this makes a lot of sense.

The usual complaint is that no fault insurance (especially government run) usually also means capped settlements. Especially from the legal industry who make their living pursuing big payouts.

4 days ago
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DARPA Wants To Kill the Password

sl149q Re: There we go again (383 comments)

Yes, I only want access to your stupid site for one transaction or comment or whatever and you make me jump through stupid fscking hoops to register an account with a password that would protect my online banking...

Type in some random garbage twice, use it, and forget it. If I ever need to go back just hit the "forgot password" link and do the same again.

about two weeks ago
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The Doctor Will Skype You Now

sl149q Re:Promising... (97 comments)

Depending on where you are of course...

But in many places your Doctor can only bill your insurance if they actually see you in the office. They cannot bill or can only bill less if they talk to you over the phone.

about two weeks ago
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Google Spots Explicit Images of a Child In Man's Email, Tips Off Police

sl149q Re:This is chilling (790 comments)

The point is that Google is a US company operating in the US under US laws. They won't enforce Russian laws.

A Russian ISP would enforce Russian laws but won't (can't be forced by a US court to) enforce US laws.

about three weeks ago
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Google Spots Explicit Images of a Child In Man's Email, Tips Off Police

sl149q Re: Well at least they saved the children! (790 comments)

They don't have to search for it... maybe.

On the other hand simply having possession is against the law. It could be construed (especially in the US where you can "get an indictment for a ham sandwich") that Google has possession of it while it resides on their servers. So IFF they have the means to ensure that they don't have it then pretending they can't check for it may not get them a pass.

They may not like having to check for it, but it may also be the safest thing for them to do.

about three weeks ago
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Google Spots Explicit Images of a Child In Man's Email, Tips Off Police

sl149q Re:Well at least they saved the children! (790 comments)

There is no legal reason for you to have porn.

Unfortunately if someone doesn't like you they may decide to bomb your mailbox with files known to match. Then just wait for the cops to show up and ask you to explain why you have them.

Interesting conundrum, if some unwanted pictures do show up, are you better off deleting them or reporting them? In some jurisdictions it may be illegal to both have a copy and not report having a copy. And if your provider reports that you have a copy but you no longer have a copy and you didn't report having a copy... it may be suspicious that you didn't report it as you don't have anything to hide right?

about three weeks ago
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Comparison: Linux Text Editors

sl149q Re:There can be only one.... (402 comments)

No, you can teach us old Unix guys new tricks. Vim is a totally acceptable acceptable upgrade to vi. Just like bash is an acceptable upgrade to sh. And perl is definitely better than awk/sed.

We do draw the line at gvim though. And I've heard rumours of a new C like language that is object oriented... haven't tried it though.

about three weeks ago
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Judge: US Search Warrants Apply To Overseas Computers

sl149q Re:It's almost sane(really) (502 comments)

The question is who controls the servers not where the servers are.

In this case a court in the US is instructing a US company that owns or controls servers to retrieve the data from the servers. In this case the servers may be located in another country and may even be owned by a subsidiary. But there is still a clear ownership from the parent through to the servers. So the US court can coerce and enforce a judgement.

Slightly more troubling is the recent example of the second scenario. A BC court has ordered Google to block some results worldwide. Google Canada does not control Google. And a Canadian court will have trouble hauling a US company into court. Google will appeal but it is a troubling decision where a court wants to exert world wide control over a non resident.

about three weeks ago
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Getting Back To Coding

sl149q Re:c/c++, vi/emacs, make, ddd (240 comments)

The above have been my IDE for several decades. Spread across two 22" screens, each of which has four 132x60 rxvts, and of course there are several dozen sets of those available to support multiple projects. With another couple of screens for running Chrome and testing on.

Every time I try to use Visual Studio I feel claustrophobic because I can't look (easily) at four or five separate files in their own windows.

about three weeks ago
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"BadUSB" Exploit Makes Devices Turn "Evil"

sl149q Re:USB 4.x to offer signed USB device signatures?? (205 comments)

Keyboards plugged in during Windows Installation will be exempt.

The fake HID keyboard can type YES all day, but since the driver software for the fake HID keyboard WON'T be loaded until the user types YES on an existing keyboard we would be OK.

This type of attack could be defeated if Windows had a security setting that forced all devices to have a properly signed INF package available before Windows will install any drivers for it. That INF (and signed cataloge file, and possibly driver files) can either be available in Windows update or installed by the end user (from the net, from cd etc.)

More likely for corporate machines a set of approved device driver files would be pre-installed making it impossible to use any USB device not authorized.

If Windows does not install drivers for the device it is a useless lump of silicon plugged into your USB port (well it could still be stealing up to 100ma of power.)

Note that Windows 7 and newer already require a signed driver. But for HID devices Microsoft will use their builtin HID driver (signed by Microsoft) matching by class (HID is a class of devices.) The suggestion is that class matching be disabled and specific matching by vendor and product id be required. That means an INF file with the correct VID/PID be available. And the only way to have that available is with a digital signature.

about three weeks ago
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Enraged Verizon FiOS Customer Seemingly Demonstrates Netflix Throttling

sl149q Re:Enraged Customer doesn't bother to research (398 comments)

So connect to a different endpoint. My VPN provider has many dozens of different locations that I can connect to in all major locations in the US (and world wide.)

about a month ago
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Enraged Verizon FiOS Customer Seemingly Demonstrates Netflix Throttling

sl149q Re:Alternative explanation (398 comments)

I would believe the bandwidth disparity argument if end user connections where also balanced, same upstream and downstream bandwidth.

If Verizon is selling asymmetric connections to end users then how can those connections generate a balanced load (same up and down)?

My local cable connection is 75MB/s down and 5MB/s up. And if I try and use a substantial portion of the UP the ability of TCP to pull large amounts of data down suffers.

about a month ago
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Enraged Verizon FiOS Customer Seemingly Demonstrates Netflix Throttling

sl149q Re:Could be a different route involved for the VPN (398 comments)

Since (well at least for the Los Angeles peering point) the finger is pointed directly at Verizon.

Level 3 has requested, Verizon has declined, to install additional 10 GB connections to increase bandwidth that is at 100% capacity.

A very low cost solution to allow traffic that Verizon's customers have requested to transit from Level 3 to Verizon's network.

about a month ago

Submissions

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Google Government Request App

sl149q sl149q writes  |  more than 4 years ago

sl149q (1537343) writes "While Google may or may not be the living up to their do no evil mantra it appears that they are trying to. This new Google App: http://www.google.com/governmentrequests/ is their attempt to show how many requests they have received from governments around the world. These can be requests to censor or requests about users or users data. This is a welcome response compared to other ISP's and Telecoms that have routinely denied or ignored requests for any information of this type. See their announcement here: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/04/greater-transparency-around-government.html for some background."
Link to Original Source
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WSJ: Time for a Climate Change Plan B

sl149q sl149q writes  |  more than 4 years ago

sl149q (1537343) writes "Whether you believe in Climate Change or Climategate the problem is that no one in the first or third world is really willing to actually pay enough to change things fast enough to make much difference. The bigger question is whether it is better to spend money to mitigate one problem (CO2) or solve other problems.

This from an article by Nigel Lawson in the WSJ article (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704107604574607793378860698.html) : "The reasons for the complete and utter failure of Copenhagen are both fundamental and irresolvable. The first is that the economic cost of decarbonizing the world's economies is massive, and of at least the same order of magnitude as any benefits it may conceivably bring in terms of a cooler world in the next century."

And: "The reason we use carbon-based energy is not the political power of the oil lobby or the coal industry. It is because it is far and away the cheapest source of energy at the present time and is likely to remain so, not forever, but for the foreseeable future."

And if we do need a conspiracy theory it is helpful to remember that 27 out of 50 of the worlds largest oil companies are state owned or controlled (http://www.energyintel.com/DocumentDetail.asp?document_id=245527)."

Link to Original Source

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