Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Russia Wants To Replace US Computer Chips With Local Processors

slashdot_commentator Re:Good luck with that (340 comments)

Sorry, patents close to expiration.

about a month ago
top

Russia Wants To Replace US Computer Chips With Local Processors

slashdot_commentator Re:Good luck with that (340 comments)

The Russians can't pull the same crap the Chinese might still be able to do. They aren't the Soviet Union anymore, with an encapsulated economy. They operate as a capitalist nation, and they're not going to be able to "copy/clone" hardware, like they used to. They'll be shutdown economically by the WTO. They're going to have to leverage outdated designs that have copyright close to expiration. What they should do is partner on some level with the Chinese, so they at least can access modern fabrication facilities and techniques.

about a month ago
top

Daniel Ellsberg: Snowden Would Not Get a Fair Trial – and Kerry Is Wrong

slashdot_commentator Re:Ellsberg got a fair trial (519 comments)

And no one will even speak the true threat the NSA poses to the world.

No one rational thinks that Merkel represents a credible ally of Al Queda. Its all about finding out what Merkel is doing, in order to surreptitiously or politically thwart Germany's political or financial actions which the NSA disapproves of. The NSA will undermine the democratically elected will of any nation, all in the name of US "security". Its not the first time the US tried to do this. Just ask Iran and Chile.

about 2 months ago
top

Daniel Ellsberg: Snowden Would Not Get a Fair Trial – and Kerry Is Wrong

slashdot_commentator Re:Ellsberg got a fair trial (519 comments)

There is no jury trial in a FISA court.

Do you even think its possible to field a jury with the security clearances required to expose them to the information presented at a trial?

about 2 months ago
top

Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Buys the LA Clippers For $2 Billion

slashdot_commentator Re:Instead of a new TV I guess (270 comments)

See the problem is that you think only in terms of binary. Ballmer was a failure or success. I don't think did as well as Jobs especially when it came to a larger strategic vision. Jobs had the vision. Ballmer was just managing things.

Incorrect. I'm pointing out that not everyone can perform like Jobs, and its obvious he was an industry anomaly. Most CEOs are more like Ballmer; they are managers, not pioneers, and they don't get the credit when they do a good job, or steer the best possible result in a losing cause. I use the basketball analogy to point out that there can be a lot of basketball superstars, and not match the performance of a Michael Jordan. That doesn't make them failures, and it doesn't make Ballmer a failure for not matching Jobs' performance.

Its unfair to compare Ballmer's tenure to Microsoft's peak in market cap, [...] Where's the contempt for Sam Palmisano

And what did Jobs start with? By any measure, Apple was nowhere near the same position as MS when both men took over their companies.

Who cares? We've already established that Jobs is a uniquely successful CEO. Jobs is the anomaly, not the standard expectation of a successful CEO.

about 2 months ago
top

UK Ballistics Scientists: 3D-Printed Guns Are 'of No Use To Anyone'

slashdot_commentator Re:Good (490 comments)

No its not, especially if you're old enough to have seen the history firsthand.

There certainly was sort of an odd chauvinism among the mainframe/minicomputer group against personal computing. Luckily, the newbs to the industry didn't even bother listening to the "professionals".

Ironically, I'd have to agree with the Beeb on this one, even if it may be a propaganda newscast. They're absolutely right; if you don't know enough about 3D materials & basic firearms, you could end up blinding yourself, or damaging you hand. I could definitely see a teenager trying this, using their parents/brother's/friend's 3D printer.

But we all know the march of technology is inexorable.

about 2 months ago
top

Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Buys the LA Clippers For $2 Billion

slashdot_commentator Re:Instead of a new TV I guess (270 comments)

Don't you also think its unfair to conclude Ballmer was a failure based on what Jobs was able to do? Its like saying Patrick Ewing was a failure because Michael Jordan was always in the way. (Except when MJ wasn't, and Ewing still failed, to the Rockets and the Pacers. Ewing was still a player to be reckoned with for most of his career, even if I think of Hakeem Owajuan as moreso, as well as having a higher opinion of Charles Barkley, Reggie Miller, and Shaq.)

Its unfair to compare Ballmer's tenure to Microsoft's peak in market cap, because that peak occurred before 2000, crashed real hard during the the 2000 bubble. Based on when Ballmer took over, and when he left, it only lost a fraction of its market cap at the time. Basically, Ballmer guided Microsoft into mediocrity, not really growing its value. But that's not the mark of a failure, considering that Sun Microsystems, Palm, etc. don't even exist today. IBM increased in market cap over the past 10 years, but it was a huge player in tech over a decade ago, and now is kind of a market afterthought. Where's the contempt for Sam Palmisano?

Lets face it, not every company can have a Steve Jobs for CEO. Does that make every tech company that didn't quadruple its market share a failure?

about 2 months ago
top

Fiat Chrysler CEO: Please Don't Buy Our Electric Car

slashdot_commentator Re:Raise the Price (462 comments)

Believe me, I see the branding and false dichotomies. And I wouldn't even be a supporter of the liberalism that causes many liberals to be disenchanted with Obama. I'm just annoyed at the hero worship and demonizing that's used to frame Obama. Its neither. And I'm sick of the operation of the current Republican party which makes it near impossible for me to consider voting for any of their politicians. But that leaves me with these defective Democrats.

about 2 months ago
top

Fiat Chrysler CEO: Please Don't Buy Our Electric Car

slashdot_commentator Re:Raise the Price (462 comments)

He sure acts like a Republican. Pass a Republican health insurance bill (ACA). Protects national spying programs and secret security police at the expense of individual rights. A few other details that escape my memory... Obama runs the country the way a Nixon or a (either) George Bush would.

about 2 months ago
top

Rand Paul Suggests Backing Bitcoin With Stocks

slashdot_commentator Re:here's why it is a reasonable idea (404 comments)

Its more than just a great idea in principle. Its a way "money" becomes an accepted form of currency exchange.

From the 18th century, paper money issued by a government was "backed" a specific amount of gold. Once you could exchange the piece of paper for goods, as if it were gold, that was the establishment of paper money. Coins didn't require quite a conceptual hurdle, because minted coins had a specific amount of gold or other precious metal smelted into the coin. That is what's called specie currency.

In the 19th & 20th century, gov'ts would "back" their paper currency with some other form of valued commodity, if backing it with gold became to prohibitively costly. Its how the Nazi's broke the inflationary cycle caused by them printing out papermarks (german dollars). The bank printing rentenmarks backed the paper with the physical assets owned by the bank.

The dumbass cryptocurrency hipsters are so in love with their dream of bitcoin working as a governmentless currency, they fail to realize is that bitcoin is not money. Its not used as an exchange medium for goods (to a significant amount). bitcoin has no intrinsic value, like fiat currency.

What Rand Paul suggests would be what bankers have done for centuries in order to make a "new" currency acceptable. Granted, you're stuck with a form of centralized authority (but it doesn't have to be governmental) "backing" the currency with something of tangible value, but cryptocurrency fans would still be able to have decentralized transactions of bitcoin, without require active participation of a government.

about 3 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator Re:When participation is mandatory? I believe. (723 comments)

What is this AHCA you're talking about? There's the PPACA, or ACA. Are you talking about your screwed up Florida system of health insurance?

about 4 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator Re:When participation is mandatory? I believe. (723 comments)

The cost has doubled and tripled because gov't has been regulating all aspects of the medical industry before the PPACA, and its aided pharmaceutical companies and hospitals (and doctors) to gouge the crap out of customers. In every other developed country, they all get medical care, while sufficiently containing costs. The US has the most inefficient health care system in the world. That means we pay 2.5x more money for the same treatment as other countries. But its the greatest system in the world, if you're rich.

about 4 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator Re:7.1 million is pathetically low, so ya I believ (723 comments)

Sorry to rain on your parade, but no way is the ACA a "long term" solution to the health insurance problem in the US. Politicians will be back to the drawing board at some point before 2030.

The other problem is that the ACA will only marginally control health care costs (according to the CBO). Overall, health care costs are going up, regardless. What the ACA really addresses is the health insurance collapse the country would have been headed towards if it didn't change the status quo in 2009.

But your perspective is much more accurate, compared to a Republican partisan. I hope there isn't huge bad news on this front before November, this year.

about 4 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator Re:Creative Counting (723 comments)

I wish I could upvote you.

about 4 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator Re:California 2016 (723 comments)

Every place is going to be a battleground state in November 2014. Presuming Obamacare is going to sway votes, we'll know exactly how successful or unsuccesful the initial phase has been by then.

about 4 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator This is a stupid tea-party topic (723 comments)

It doesn't matter if the federal gov't is lying about the number of people enrolled. The federal gov't lies to its citizens all the time, for political perception management. And we've never seen Republicans lie about what the gov't has done and not done. /s

The key thing to realize is that the federal gov't is not going to be able lie to the actuaries who set policy premiums. And after business health insurance pools sets its rates later this year, and states/businesses opt in, or drop out, we'll know by 2015 if the ACA seems to be working, or was a bald faced lie.

about 4 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator Re:And that's surprising why? (723 comments)

The worst "penalty" would be uninsured, and have to pay a tax for it ($350-700?).

The "deadline" was all about being covered for health care in 2014. There's nothing stopping you from enrolling next year, and paying a premium minus the tax, to be covered in 2015. Or pay nothing at all and have insurance in 2015. Or pay an increase in your health insurance because the health insurance exchanges didn't get enough young people to enroll.

about 4 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator Re:woo hoo (723 comments)

I actually have a smidge more sympathy for the crooked-ass contractors. I believe Kathy Sibelius, and every manager associated with the website, should have resigned for the piss poor project management done by HHS to implement the federal website.

about 4 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator Re:It's California (723 comments)

Eventually, hospitals and clinics won't be able to charge $37 for an aspirin. They will have to meet eligibility requirements, via ACA, and they were never able to charge $37 for an aspirin through health insurers. That was the ER admission cost. Finally, profits from insurance plans are capped; if the insurance company charges too much for their premium, they will have to return the excess to policyholders.

It doesn't mean the PPACA is going to fix health care costs. I predict the health care tax burden is going to be unmanageable some time after 2030. But having the PPACA now was probably better than keeping the status quo in 2009.

about 4 months ago
top

Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

slashdot_commentator Re:Plan not grandfathered and minimum standard. (723 comments)

You live in a state that did not accept Medicaid expansion or run a state health insurance exchange. The Federal gov't covers 95% of medicaid coverage costs for the next three years. So basically, your state had to accept pre-existing conditions, while not getting access to the 95% medicaid payment pool. Presuming the federal gov't only offset medicaid costs by 50%, that's an addition of pre-existing conditions added, with only 50% federal medicaid payments, rather than 95%; of course there's an increase. Also, when you don't have health insurers offering plans in your state, you don't get the increased competition needed to decrease premium costs. That's what it means to be on the federal health insurance exchange. You should be able to get tax rebates to offset your premium increases, unless you make over 4x the federal poverty level (you probably do, but dependents will affect that "level").

about 4 months ago

Submissions

slashdot_commentator hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

top

Meme: extending the ISS lifetime beyond 2016

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 6 years ago

As all the space geeks know, the ISS is planned to operational to 2016, only six years after construction is completed. Afterwards, it will either sit in space until it falls to Earth, or more likely, there will be a deorbit plan to have it burn up "safely" over an ocean.

Everyone following it knows the ISS was pretty much a "white elephant" space project. There will be no future shuttles servicing it (after 2010), and its unlikely the Russians will keep servicing it, out of its own wallet. But with the rise of space programs outside of the big 2, could it not be possible to keep the ISS going beyond 2016?

After all, space station Mir functioned years beyond its original closing date. You have the Japanese, the Indians, and the Chinese all looking to make a mark in space. Perhaps the ISS could be the future launching point of space tourism. Talk about the most exclusive dining experience. What would need to be accounted for to allow this possibility to come about?

top

Network Appliances sues Sun over patent infringments in ZFS

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 6 years ago Network Appliances is suing Sun Microsystems, alleging that seven of its patents are unlawfully being used in ZFS, the filesystem used in Solaris 10 and OpenSolaris. Ironically, Sun may have shot itself in the foot. They initiated legal proceedings against NetApp 18 months ago, over related patents Sun believed NetApp was infringing. Dave Hitz, NetApp's founder and Exec VP lays out his case in a blog entry.

top

Looking for a new laptop. Suggestions?

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Man, laptop shopping is a bitch...

Requirements:
It will run Windoze (for the games). (& dual-boot linux, of course)

Main applications: portable DVD player, websurfing, games.

(Since I want exposure to 64-bit environments for development purposes)
Core2Duo or Turion-64/X2

Portability: Having previously owned a purported 7lb portable (that felt more like a 10lb portable), the target weight will be ~5.5lbs or less.

Indirectly, this means I'm aiming for a 14" (or less) widescreen

Good battery performance: 3+ hrs

Pricing: Not over USD $1050.

The Sony VAIO VGN-C150P/B probably comes closest to my ideal machine, but it is list price $500 over what I am willing to spend.

Right now, the Lenovo 3000 N100 will probably be what I pickup, but boy, I hate that Intel graphics chip.

Suggestions, anyone?

top

OpenBSD: GPL violator?

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Michael Buesch, lead developer of the Linux driver for Broadcom's wifi chipset (bcm43xx), stumbled across copied code in the OpenBSD's bcw driver earlier this week. The problem is that the bcm43xx linux driver uses a GPL license. OpenBSD inadvertently makes that linux code available to be used in a proprietary manner, by virtue of its BSD license (and not giving proper attribution where due).

Busch sends a stern email to the developers of OpenBSD, and CCs the bcm43xx developers mailing list. Now enjoy the fireworks as Theo de Raadt defends the tender feelings of an apparent plagiarist, downplays intellectual property theft, and attacks "rude" behavior.

top

Kernel 2.6, wheel mouse, and KVMs

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 8 years ago

(Yet another /. rejection. Not unsurprising, since its so esoteric, but I know quite a few guys with this problem:)

For some geeks, one box cannot do it all (well). You need your reliable server, your Windows PC (for games and Windows-centric applications), your firewall/VPN, and one or two more boxes for experiments. Or you're the poor SOB who administers all the machines for your family. (Et cetera...) KVMs are really sweet for such setups, but not if you dropped $150 for a Belkin Omniview F1DS104U and run (Slackware) Linux.

Anyone afflicted with similar setups know that the Linux doesn't handle Belkin's (or generic) KVM switching between machines properly. The KVM doesn't retain/transmit mouse information between machines, and you end up with an erratic mouse that will corrupt your GUI configuration. With the 2.4 kernel, this is worked around by flipping out and back into of GUI mode (ctrl-alt-F1 then ctrl-alt-F7) with each machine switch.

But recently, I took the plunge to kernel 2.6.13. (It seemed stable enough.) It does things differently enough that I cannot use the mode switch kludge to get around the problem. The only way I've found to resolve the problem is opening a CLI session, and removing and restoring the psmouse module. Needless to say, this pretty much kills the convenience functionality of a KVM.

And my friend Google has let me down. Some users have found that adding an "append=psmouse.proto=imps" in lilo.conf resolves the problem for them. (Slackware 10.2's kernel never heard of it.) So, does anyone have a solution yet that resolves this problem, or USD $275+ to lend me for the "get a real KVM" response? Or are a bunch of linux geeks stuck running a 2.4 kernel for another year?"

top

Insightful Lightbulb Joke

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 9 years ago

How many Bush Administration officials does it take to screw in a light bulb?

None.

There is nothing wrong with the light bulb; its conditions are improving every day. Any reports of its lack of incandescence are a delusional spin from the liberal media. That light bulb has served honorably, and anything you say undermines the lighting effect. Why do you hate freedom?

(kudos to some guy named Naum from AZplace.net)

top

More failure - Attracting the non-geeky creative types

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 9 years ago I was about to add my $0.02 to this response when it occurred to me to submit the question here.

How can the community attact the artistic and fiction writing types into open-license type projects?

It seems to me the better documented type open-license projects are able to attract technical writers, but not so much with games. The few good ones tend to be one man shows who are already artistically inclined.

Should the programmer community start focusing on generic game engine tools to aid these people in expressing their talent? Are programmers "bogarting" the credit for a game? What suggestions come to mind?

top

St. Valentines Day hazardous to health

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 9 years ago (Once more into the breach...)

Falling in love used to be fun. Now doctors are warning that the throes of passion should be seen as a potentially fatal medical disorder.

Psychologists say that "lovesickness" is a genuine disease that needs more awareness and diagnosis.

Symptoms can include mania, such as an elevated mood and inflated self-esteem, or depression, revealing itself as tearfulness and insomnia.

top

Time for some more rejection - BSEs found in goat

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 9 years ago

Submitted title: Mad Cow Disease discovered in other animal species (Science,News)

The BBC reports that a French goat has tested positive for mad cow disease - the first animal in the world other than a cow to have bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The European Commission says further testing will be done to see if the incidence is an isolated one.

You can thank the animal rendering industry for that one. Time to change to a vegetarian diet?

top

James (Scotty) Doohan has Alzheimer's

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  about 10 years ago

Terrible news, the actor James Doohan, who played Chief Engineer Montgomery Scott in the TV sci-fi series Star Trek, is diagnosed with the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Sadly, he also suffers from Parkinson's disease and diabetes.

In August, he'll bid farewell to the still thriving Trek convention circuit, with "Beam Me Up Scotty...One Last Time," a three-day fest that's billed as his last-ever con appearance.

(Yeah, lets see the /. editors pass on this submission...)

top

Would you inflict linux on Aunt Tillie?

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 10 years ago

Eric S. Raymond has recently written a wonderful piece explaining to the linux zealot why it may not be the operating system of choice of all users. (Or what user aspects open source developers need to focus on to further Linux World Domination.) The op-ed specifically focuses on the CUPS printing system. (But it would be a mistake to dismiss it as a screed against CUPS.) The CUPS authors surprisingly acknowleged ESR's points, and he wrote a followup to the article.

top

Computer Espionage in the US Senate Judiciary

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 10 years ago

What do you do when you just can't get your co-workers to see eye-to-eye with you? The Boston Globe reports that Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee stole confidential memos from their Democratic counterparts by cracking into their computer files. The memos highlighted Democratic strategies concerning Republican Judicial nominees. Its suspected that some of them were leaked to Republican shill Robert Novak, who then disclosed their contents in a February 2003 column.

What can we learn from Republicans when accused of cracking?

(Blame the victim.)

"As the extent to which Democratic communications were monitored came into sharper focus, Republicans yesterday offered a new defense. They said that in the summer of 2002, their computer technician informed his Democratic counterpart of the glitch, but Democrats did nothing to fix the problem."

(Feign ignorance and indignation.)

"Judiciary Chairman Orrin Hatch, Republican of Utah, made a preliminary inquiry and described himself as "mortified that this improper, unethical and simply unacceptable breach of confidential files may have occurred on my watch."

("I'm shocked, *shocked* to find cracking in this establishment." "Here are their memos." "Ah, thank you...")

top

Novell screws SCO for Xmas

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 10 years ago

Novell quietly submitted conflicting copyright claims on System V UNIX a few months ago. SCO's lawyers appears to have been unaware of this. Now SCO will have serious problems going forward with its copyright infringement suits on IBM and other major Linux users. The immediate result of Novell's actions is that SCO's lawsuits will probably be deferred, so no windfall quarters for SCO to report in the following year. SCO could even suffer legal penalties by submitting flawed DMCA suits.

Ahhh, nothing like a nice holiday story to warm the cockles of a penguinista's heart...

top

Criticize Microsoft security, get fired.

slashdot_commentator slashdot_commentator writes  |  more than 10 years ago

After 12 rejections and the "de rigeur" absence of explanations, I've decided to post each story I submit to /. into this journal for your perusal.

...and given the nature of this story, it should be interesting to see if /. has the stones to publish it...

The soon to be rejected submission:

Dan Geer Jr., is now the former CTO of @Stake, Inc. (a security consulting group), after participating with six other security experts in a report (released yesterday) critical of the US Government's over-reliance in Microsoft products. The report, entitled "CyberInsecurity: The Cost of Monopoly" argues that a "monoculture" of OS software makes gov't computers more vulnerable to computer viruses and hacker attacks.

``The values and opinions of the report are not in line with AtStake's views,'' the company said in a statement. It said Geer's participation working on the report was ``not sanctioned.''

Bruce Schneier, the chief technology officer for Counterpane Systems Inc., worked with Geer on the report. He said security experts contacted to help work on the report critical of Microsoft indicated their support but couldn't participate publicly. ``There is a huge chilling effect based on Microsoft's monopoly position,'' Schneier said. ``It's unfortunate that AtStake put its private agenda ahead of intellectual integrity.''

More sordid details can be gleaned here and here. Lets hope Schneier still has a job by the end of the week. (And any /. posters who dare comment.)

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...