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Microsoft YouTube App Strips Ads; Adds Download

slashnot007 Wrong measure (381 comments)

The total market however more than doubled in that time. Apple is still gaining market. It's just losing it's fractional share of unit sales.
If instead you measure the market in revenue, rather than unit sales. Then apple is rising in fractional market share. Moreover It's margins are also vastly higher. So in terms of profit it has a majority of the market.

about a year and a half ago
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Foldit Player May Have Created a Useful Protein

slashnot007 Alterataive to fold it (144 comments)

If you don't want to play the game but do want to help protein research then there are a couple of ways you can donate some of your unused computer time to researchers in this field. The newest way about to come on-line is a project by Dr. Charlie Strauss at Los Alamos National Lab. He is in the process of setting up a distributed grid of volunteer computers from folks who want to donate cycles on their (intel) mac computers to protein design. It's not online yet but you already have the software installed on your mac. it's part of the mac-OS and it's called xgrid and it's in your sharing preferences. If you have a mac, with a multi-core intel CPU and want to donate some of your underutilized computing power then write to him at cems (at) lanl.gov with the subject line "Joining the Xgrid" for details. He's working on replacements for antibodies and enzymes that can digest wood waste into bio-fuels.

If you have never heard of Xgrid, it's a descendant of the ZILLA project that ran on NeXT computers. One of the earliest volunteer grids. Zilla is credited with pivotal exploration of the 4 color map theorem proof and foundational work in big-computing CGI.

more than 4 years ago
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Firefox Is Lagging Behind, Its Co-Founder Says

slashnot007 Re:Firefox plugins (646 comments)

Chrome is starting to get more attractive but I'm having a hard time with the mono-bar. I just don't like every key I press being sent to google. I don't use gmail for the same reason.

more than 4 years ago
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Firefox Is Lagging Behind, Its Co-Founder Says

slashnot007 Firefox plugins (646 comments)

If it were not for the plugins I'd drop firefox in an flash. It's s a bloated slow to launch pig. that get's dusted even by safari on page loads.
    But flashblock, adblock and zotero are pretty sweet things.

more than 4 years ago
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Scientists Propose Guaranteed Hypervisor Security

slashnot007 hypervisor != OS (104 comments)

Okay so One can protect the hypervisor execution. How do we protect the OS and the software the hypervisor's software storage?

There has to be a way to update the hypervisor, and presumably that update comes over the web. You can guarantee the that code will execute in a protected space but can you guarantee you are executing the right code or that the code itself does not have a security hole.

The there is the OS. Presumably this can still be infected. Also presumably some attacks will run in a layer between the hypervisor and OS. That is they will create a virtual hypervisor of a malicious type.

Still it's a great advance. I expect the military and banking industry will be the early adopters.

more than 4 years ago
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HTML Web App Development Still Has a Ways To Go

slashnot007 back to perl! (279 comments)

The ultimate glue language. It's not pretty as python but it's a woodchipper when it comes to parsing and re-gluing outputs. Indeed that's what the acronym P.E.R.L strands for. My favorite reason to use perl is that you can do more things more easily with the core language. You don't have to depend upon importing libs. The surprise is that it's also not bloated at the core level: compare the thickness of the perl pocket ref to any other language. it's tiny.

more than 4 years ago
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First Superbugs, Now Superweeds

slashnot007 whacked slashdot text format (435 comments)

Why does slashdot make my comments formatted in courier font?

more than 4 years ago
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First Superbugs, Now Superweeds

slashnot007 bad analogy (435 comments)

It's a weak analogy to compare super weeds to superbugs.  In the case of bugs we have a  huge limit.  There is only one species we are defending (us) and we can't just arbitrarily medicate ourselves.  With the plants we a defending, they are replanted every year, we can treat the soils and the plants arbitrarily, and even genetically modify the plants if crop rotation itself is not sufficient.  For example plant corn to share them for several years.

So I think we do understand  a lot of the externalities as far as the battle between wanted and unwanted plants goes.

The place where we don't understant the externalities is in the consequences outside that battle.  Will BT plants also kill good bugs or bugs that birds like to eat?  Will pesticide runoff get in the fish we eat or water we drink?  Will putting animal proteins in plants someday create prions?

more than 4 years ago
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Net Neutrality Suffers Major Setback

slashnot007 telecom (790 comments)

Remember the FCC is the Federal Communications Commission.   Notice the word Communications.  So it seems like they might have some authority here.

One place we know they do have authority is telephony.  And the largest immediate threats posed by the decision I think are to 1)  VOIP  and 2) Netflix.  For brevity, I'm going to ignore bittorrent because at present while a big bandwidth hog, it's not a commercialized bandwidth hog like the other two.

it will be easy for comcast to squeeze out all VOIP and streaming video providers with simple QOS tweaks.  Already Netflix is barely tolerable and it would not take much for me to give it up.  Likewise Comcast is now in the VOIP market so why not prefer their own packets over others?

You can't even call it Anti-trust since they are not leveraging one market to enter another.  Indeed Comcast has been in the movie providing market longer than netflix.  You might make the anti-trust argument for voip however.

Which brings me back to the FCC.  the FCC might not have the authority to regulate all of the internet but surely they can regulate VOIP since that is telephony.

I sure hope they do, because once all the VOIP and netflix competition is squeezed out to either comcast itself or to people that partner with comcast  it's going to be hard to decentralize it again.

I'll make one other prediction.  the fate of bit torrent.  right now bit torrent is nothing but cost to COmcast.  if it went away people would not stop paying for their internet connection so there's no downside to squeezing it out.  I suspect the future of Bittorrent is how it becomes monetized.  If comcast could profit from bit torrent then they will be happy for it because, when done correctly, bit torrent more efficiently broadcasts across the edges of the network rather than the backbone.    I suspect the way it will be monetized is that someone will start selling movies using some set top internet box (roku, apple-tv, etc...) that uses bit torrent rather than limewire to deliver the content.  you park the top 200 movies in slices out on people's set top boxes-- these are not movies they ordered, you are just parking them there for delivery.  then you distribute this from these boxes.  You could even compensate the box owners for using some of their bandwidth.  THe key is you do this in a locked down DRM way where one company is selling the service.  now it makes money and costs less infrastructure wise than direct streaming.  Comcast will get a cut.

I suspect that's the future of peer to peer.

more than 4 years ago
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Solving the Knight's Tour Puzzle In 60 Lines of Python

slashnot007 4 lines of python and faster (311 comments)

fixed logic bug. now 4 lines.

This essentially proves that badly written python is almost as unitelligible as badly written perl.  Interestingly badly written python is easier to debug than badly written perl.  But then again perl-golf is played for characters not lines!  for example, bzip2 is done in 55 perl characters.

def recurse((position, visited),xdim= int(__import__("sys").argv[1]),ydim=
int(__import__("sys").argv[2])):

        map(recurse,sorted([(t,visited+[t]) for t in (lambda t: [ (t[0]+2, t[1]+1), (t[0]+2, t[1]-1), (t[0]-2, t[1]+1), (t[0]-2, t[1]-1), (t[0]-1, t[1]+2), (t[0]-1, t[1]-2),(t[0]+1, t[1]+2),(t[0]+1, t[1]-2)])(position) if 0<=t[0]<xdim and 0<=t[1]<ydim and t not in visited],lambda x,y:cmp(len( [1  for t in [  (-1,-1),(-1,0),(-1,1),(0,-1),(0,1),(1,-1),(1,0),(1,1)]  if (x[0][0]+t[0],x[0][1]+t[1])  in visited ] ),len( [1  for t in [  (-1,-1),(-1,0),(-1,1),(0,-1),(0,1),(1,-1),(1,0),(1,1)]  if (y[0][0]+t[0],y[0][1]+t[1])  in visited ] ))))

        if len(visited) == xdim*ydim: print "success: %s"%str(visited).strip("[]"),__import__("sys").exit()

for ii,jj in [ (i,j) for i in xrange((int(__import__("sys").argv[1])+1)/2) for j in xrange( (int(__import__("sys").argv[2])+1)/2) ]:  recurse(((ii,jj),[(ii,jj)]))

about 6 years ago
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Solving the Knight's Tour Puzzle In 60 Lines of Python

slashnot007 4+1 lines of python and faster (311 comments)

this now includes the optimization of sorting the order that squares are checked by their number of neighbors.  the so-called lonely squares first the original 60 line code had.  For sanity this is implemented as an extra line of code defining a function.  But python-golfers could cut a stroke by unrolling that function definition into the two places it gets called.

def neigh(p,visited,xdim,ydim):  return len( [1 for u in [ (p[0][0]+t[0],p[0][1]+t[1])  for t in [  (-1,-1),(-1,0),(-1,1),(0,-1),(0,1),(1,-1),(1,0),(1,1)] ] if 0<=u[0]<xdim and 0<=u[1]<ydim and u not in visited ] )

def recurse((position, visited),xdim= int(__import__("sys").argv[1]),ydim=
int(__import__("sys").argv[2])):

        map(recurse,sorted([(t,visited+[t]) for t in (lambda t: [ (t[0]+2, t[1]+1), (t[0]+2, t[1]-1), (t[0]-2, t[1]+1), (t[0]-2, t[1]-1), (t[0]-1, t[1]+2), (t[0]-1, t[1]-2),(t[0]+1, t[1]+2),(t[0]+1, t[1]-2)])(position) if 0<=t[0]<xdim and 0<=t[1]<ydim and t not in visited],lambda x,y:cmp(neigh(x,visited,xdim,ydim),neigh(y,visited,xdim,ydim) )) )

        if len(visited) == xdim*ydim: print "success: %s"%str(visited).strip("[]"),__import__("sys").exit()

for ii,jj in [ (i,j) for i in xrange((int(__import__("sys").argv[1])+1)/2) for j in xrange( (int(__import__("sys").argv[2])+1)/2) ]:  recurse(((ii,jj),[(ii,jj)]))

about 6 years ago
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Solving the Knight's Tour Puzzle In 60 Lines of Python

slashnot007 4 lines of python (311 comments)

def recurse((position, visited),xdim= int(__import__("sys").argv[1]),ydim= int(__import__("sys").argv[2])):
        map(recurse,[(t,visited+[t]) for t in (lambda t: [ (t[0]+2, t[1]+1), (t[0]+2, t[1]-1), (t[0]-2, t[1]+1), (t[0]-2, t[1]-1), (t[0]-1, t[1]+2), (t[0]-1, t[1]-2),(t[0]+1, t[1]+2),(t[0]+1, t[1]-2)])(position) if 0<=t[0]<xdim and 0<=t[1]<ydim and t not in visited])
        if len(visited) == xdim*ydim: print "success: %s"%str(visited).strip("[]"),__import__("sys").exit()
for ii,jj in [ (i,j) for i in xrange((int(__import__("sys").argv[1])+1)/2) for j in xrange( (int(__import__("sys").argv[2])+1)/2) ]:  recurse(((ii,jj),[(ii,jj)]))

This version also adds back the feature deleted in the 7 line version which tries all possible (non-redundant) starting positions.

about 6 years ago
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Solving the Knight's Tour Puzzle In 60 Lines of Python

slashnot007 11 lines of code (311 comments)


Nwide = 5
def check_path(board,i1,i2,x,y,n):
    if board[x+i1][y+i2]<n: return False
    board[x+i1][y+i2] = n
    for j1,j2 in [ (1,2),(1,-2),(2,1),(2,-1),(-2,1),(-2,-1),(-1,2),(-1,-2) ] :
          if n==Nwide*Nwide-1 or check_path(board,j1,j2,x+i1,y+i2,n+1): return True
    board[x+i1][y+i2] = Nwide*Nwide+1
    return False
for ii,jj in [ (i,j) for i in xrange((Nwide+1)/2) for j in xrange(i,(Nwide+1)/2) ]:
    board0 = [[  Nwide*Nwide+1 if  i >1 and i< Nwide+2  and j >1 and j<Nwide+2 else 0 for i in xrange(Nwide+4)] for j in xrange(Nwide+4) ]
    if check_path(board0,0,0,ii+2,jj+2,0) : print [ j[2:-2] for j in board0[2:-2] ]

This is not speedy however.  It also does not take advantage of any symmetry assumptions other than the initial placement of the first move is restricted.

about 6 years ago
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Ethical Killing Machines

slashnot007 Safe forever from the rock (785 comments)

An old cartoon had a series of panels. the first panel had a cave man picking up a rock saying "saf forever from the fist". Next panel is a man inventing a spear, saying "safe forever from the rock". And so on, swords, bow and arrows, cata pults, guns, bombs.... well you get the idea.

On the otherhand, the evolution of those items coincided with the evolution of society. For example, You had to have an organized civil society to gather the resource to make a machine gun. (who mines the ore for the metal. Who feeds the miners? who loans the money for the mine?...)

It's a bit of a chicken and egg about which drives which these days, but certainly early on, mutual defense did promote societal organization.

So "safe forever from the angry soldier" is the next step. It's already happened in some ways with the drone so it's not as big an ethical step to the foor soldier, and given the delberateness with which drones are used compared to the dump and run of WWII bombing one can credibly argue they can be used ethically.

On the other hand war has changed a bit. The US no longer try to "seize lands" mititarily to expand nations (economically instead). (russia and china are perhaps the exceptions). These days it's more a job of fucking up nations we think are screwing with us. E.g. Afganistan.

Now imagine the next war where a bunch of these things get dropped into an assymetrical situation. Maybe even a hostage situation on an oil tanker in somalia.

It's really going to change the dynamic I think, when the "enemy" can't even threaten you. Sure it could be expensive but it totally deprives the enemy of the incentive of revenge for perceived injustice.

On the other hand it might make the decision to attack easier.

more than 6 years ago
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New Nanotech Fabric Never Gets Wet

slashnot007 Great news for slashdotters (231 comments)

No more wet beds! Also this will be great news for the British public restroom officials. After years of experimenting with Wax paper as toilet paper they can now go high tech. (Can anyone explain to me why on earth the british public restrooms use velum-like TP?) The downside is that now when you accidentally pee in your trowsers, instead of getting a wet spot it all ends up in your shoe.

more than 6 years ago
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A Web App For Real-Time Collaborative Writing

slashnot007 Re:Looks great! (157 comments)

Pardon me if I'm wrong but isn't subversion entirely line based? And you can't actually see the changes in place and highlighted. It just lists them like diffs and you get to accept or reject them enmass.

perosnally I used writely (before it became the google app). And there's some even better ones now like Zoho, which is a ms word look-alike for collaborative writing.

more than 6 years ago
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Why Developers Are Switching To Macs

slashnot007 He claims he uses Macs. but I don't think so (771 comments)

His article was shockingly poorly researched when you consider the following factual blunders:

4) all the unix parts of the system REQUIRE linefeeds not carriage returns, so he got it completely backwards. Moreover, since OS9 a majority of mac apps are agnostic about carriage return versus linefeed (or both), so as to be Microsoft compatible.

3) Whether the file system is case-sensitive or not is a setting the user can choose. So if developers care then it does not matter.

2) moreover if you are developing for linux in a VM as he says then it will be case preserving on the linux partition or VDI anyhow so this issue never even arises.

1) Apple's File system is called HFS+ , not AFS (which stands for Carnegie Mellon's Andrew File system). The remote access protocol is called AFP but it's hardly a "default" since one can substitute SAMBA or NFS just as easily.

I'm surprised he did not raise the 1-button mouse canard. Or complain about the lack of a floppy disk. I susprised he did not mention

more than 6 years ago
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On the Economics of the Kindle

slashnot007 Cost estimates off by factor of ten, inconvenient. (398 comments)

With a real hardback book I can resell it on amazon for most of what I paid for it. Moreover I can buy it used to begin with. So the cost estimates here are off by a factor of 8 to 10 at least. Of course here is some inconvenience i reselling. On the other hand I can also buy a lot more books at one time for the same price and keep them till I'm ready to read. Conveience to me is being able to toss a book in my airplane bag or beach bag. I'm not taking my kindle to the pool or the beach. I'm not going to leave it outside on the patio table while I go take a pee or refill my drink. And I'm certainly not parking it beside the piss pot, or taking it in the bathtub with me. Besides, being old school, I find there's a great deal of visceral nature to books that somehow is part of the reading. Even being able to dog ear a page or write in the margins of certain kinds of books is a very good way to use them effectively. Not to mention...convenient.

more than 6 years ago
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New AMD Processors Aiming Between Laptops and Netbooks

slashnot007 Re:Far too many big corps are unhappy with netbook (77 comments)

Why would anyone but a bussiness person want a netbook? Just asking not stating. Presumably bussiness folks want to check e-mail, corporate calanders, catch a movie, and show power points. They will never program, do calculations on the road with them so how much power do you need. If you need to program or present calculations wou want a big screen and big KB anyhow, plus a fast CPU and battery to match. So it's gonna be bigger. Net books only need slow cpus right?

more than 6 years ago
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Scientists Discover Proteins Controlling Evolution

slashnot007 Re:So here's the question ... (436 comments)

Nor even in my children since eggs are all created at a young age.

If you are looking at increasing your penis size I'm guessing you are male. So I don't see what eggs have to do with it.

While you may be auto-erotic, I prefer to reproduce using a female partner. Eggs are definitely required.

more than 6 years ago

Submissions

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Flat screen TVs almost mass-produced in 1958

slashnot007 slashnot007 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

slashnot007 (576103) writes "Popular science reported that flat video screens were available in 1957, and apparently even robust enough for avionic displays. For a time RCA was set to license and produce the Flat Screen TVs, then they changed their minds. "Meeting for the final approval, somebody on the Board of Directors' of RCA said, "Wait a minute, we've forgotten something. How are we going to explain to our stockholders that we wasted millions of dollars on the wrong tube?" And there was silence. And that did it." If you like that one then this 1954 vision at the dawn of the mass produced discrete transistor age, forecast things resembling VCRs, color Plasma TVs and solar cells. They forecast Video phones and cable TV but accurately anticipated these would be slow to come until enough bandwidth was possible."
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