Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

The Army Is 3D Printing Warheads

slew Re:GPLv4 - the good public license? (140 comments)

Which is why I explicitly said 20th century.

...Because the language people speak in various lands around the world was decided by military actions in the 20th century?

Thanks for the irrelevant 400-year history lesson, though.

No, no, thank you for confirming what I was thinking...

yesterday
top

The Army Is 3D Printing Warheads

slew Re:GPLv4 - the good public license? (140 comments)

And yet strangely the two largest language groups are Mandarin and Spanish, the two least successful millitaries of the 20th century.

However, in 200BC, the Qin (aka Chin) dynasty had quite the army, and in the 16th and early 17th century, Spain had quite the military/navy.

FWIW, much of the geopolitical world as we know it wasn't formed in the 20th century. Much of the current geo-political alignments of the world were formed as a result of the Holy roman empire in the 800's, the exploits of Genghis Khan in the 12th century, and early Spanish explorers (and conquistadors) in the Americas. Of course the weapons they manufactured back then were primitive by modern standards, they managed to shape the world as we know it.

Of course no dynasty lasts forever...

4 days ago
top

Black Holes Not Black After All, Theorize Physicists

slew Re:So ... (225 comments)

Seriously, can we get a can analogy (yeah, I know, imagine a perfectly spherical car, bastards! ;-)

Neutron star: imagine what happens when you trade in your Ford Aerostar under the Cash-for-Clunkers program...
Such a car is not massive enough to become a black hole consuming all your gas money, but bigger than a Crown-V (aka Chandrasekhar limit) which is the largest car that ends it's life as a white dud (aka dwarf).

5 days ago
top

Black Holes Not Black After All, Theorize Physicists

slew Re:Mostly done by 1985... (225 comments)

Gravitational time dilation affects the falling object, not the observer. If you claim that if I throw a baseball at a sufficiently large star then I'll eventually see the baseball slow down as it approaches it, then you need an explanation for the repulsive force.

Actually you probably won't actually "see" it slow down, it will eventually red-shift to be invisible (which is actually slowing down). Gravitational time dilation makes an object an object approaching the event horizon of a black hole to appear to slow down, taking an infinite time to reach the event horizon.

5 days ago
top

French Blogger Fined For Negative Restaurant Review

slew Re:TripAdvisor (424 comments)

Of course 80% of the reviews suspiciously appeared after the lawsuit was publicized (10% of the most recent reviews are in English instead of French is another clue). The old ones are mostly mediocre, but as you might expect the recent ones are mostly complaining about the lawsuit (and the recent ones posted after the lawsuit publicity appear to be perhaps a bit reality-challenged). Me thinks there might be more lawsuits on the way ;^)

There appears to be only 1/7 reviews on yelp that predate this event and appears to have the common qualities of a yelp review (you can read whatever you want into that assessment).

On the other hand, it appears to be just a generic pizza place in a rinky-dink (pop 7396) coastal town in France. What do people expect?

about two weeks ago
top

People Who Claim To Worry About Climate Change Don't Cut Energy Use

slew Re:No real surprise (710 comments)

Eh, I think Karl Schwarzschild is the name you're looking for...

Actually, I think the name you might be looking for is John Michell...

Nobody really knows who deserves the actual credit for INVENTING the name black hole, but Johnny Wheeler (for those that know, he was the Feynman before Feynman) certainly was the person to popularize the term.

Anecdotally, Mr. Wheeler claims to have heard it shouted out from the audience at a meeting Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York in 1967, but it seems to have been popular for some time before that. In Jan 18, 1964, the Science News Letter about a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) apparently had this quote:

According to Einstein’s general theory of relativity, as mass is added to a degenerate star a sudden collapse will take place and the intense gravitational field of the star will close in on itself. Such a star then forms a ‘black hole’ in the universe.

Perhaps even more importantly, a few French scientists objected to the term (because of it's dual meaning in French), but that objection probably sealed the deal on the name.

about two weeks ago
top

Physicists Spot Potential Source of 'Oh-My-God' Particles

slew No... (144 comments)

That's kindof BS...

Mass doesn't expand infinitely nor is there a speed threshold of energy as far as our current understanding of physics goes... This is a simplistic bookkeeping trick that attempts to account for limited acceleration near the speed of light (since F=ma, for a given force, you get less "a" if you somehow fudge 'm' to increase as you approach the speed of light). General relativity explains this much better by having any mass or energy actually distort space time so that you don't ever need this overly simplistic bookkeeping trick (which has unfortunate anomalies like rest-mass and photons having no rest mass, but momentum).

In your own frame of reference, you can accelerate as long as you have the energy to do so. The problem is that from an external observer's frame of reference despite your apparent acceleration from your frame of reference (you think you are going faster and faster), your time dilation factor relative to the observer means it doesn't observer you exceeding the speed of light, The observer thinks your acceleration (dv/dt) is asymptotically approaching zero as you approach the speed of light. Even though you have been accelerating all the time, you don't teleport relative to the observer (although the observer will think you were moving very, very fast, but not faster than light), but if you were to get back to the same frame of reference as the observer, you will have noticed your observer has experience quite a bit more time than you have (this is the origin of the twin paradox of special relativity).

From your special relatively frame of reference, you moved very fast (because you experienced less time for the distance you appeared to travel), but from the observers point of view, more time was experienced, so the velocity never exceed the speed of light. The way this is book-kept for is usually lorenzian length contraction. As you approach the speed of light the distance you observer to traverse over a unit of your time is shorter, so when you divide the distance by your time, you also don't observe that you went faster than the speed of light.

Of course if you could somehow create say a warp drive (or some other FTL transport), to a third party observer, you might appear to be in two places at once, and/or it would appear like time transport, but many folks thinks it is really possible to do this. Creating such a warp disturbance (actually warping space time around you) would likely require a very, very large, but not infinite amount of energy to maintain a negative energy-density around you. It is hypothesized you could not do this w/o some sort of pervasive zero-point energy source or creation of a type of exotic matter to sustain the required region of negative energy-density.

about three weeks ago
top

US Tech Firms Recruiting High Schoolers (And Younger)

slew Re:actors and athletes get paid at 13 (253 comments)

Yes, but 13yo actors and athletes need special work permits and still need to attend to school whilst working.

In many localities, they must have part of their earnings put directly into trust funds (e.g., a Coogan account in California) so neither they or their parents will blow all the money on something, or up something...

Also, when the sums of money are large enough, many reputable employers require profession agent representation (so they don't claim to have been taken advantage of and sue later).

I doubt any of these internet companies are doing any of these even minimal best-practices/policies for these 13yo nerds (and these minimal things don't even prevent the Lindsey Lohans and Tracy Austins of the world)...

about three weeks ago
top

ESA Shows Off Quadcopter Landing Concept For Mars Rovers

slew Re:GPS on Mars (104 comments)

It isn't about capability, it's about € the ESA can't afford to put up Galileo, l suspect that putting up a global navigation system around Mars would be a bit cost prohibitive for this application.

Part of the problem with deploying a GNS is that you need ground uplink station for reference correction (inertial clock correction and fault detection isn't generally sufficient for good long term accuracy). At least they might have less of a problem with ionospheric propagation delay (Mars still has a single layer of ionosphere, though, and since Mars doesn't have much of a magnetic field, it's subject to lots of solar wind effects, so very little is known about correcting for it).

No worries, though, I doubt the ESA isn't thinking about a Martian GNS for this, it's just a research project which happened to use GPS for coarse location. The real technology uses a vision-based navigation supplemented by a laser range-finder and barometer.

about three weeks ago
top

Tractor Beam Created Using Water Waves

slew The light stuff works totally differently (71 comments)

FWIW, this paper talks about doing this with light (in the context of micro-manipulation). Doesn't look like we will be using this for any star-ship sized objects in the near future...

The basic idea is that you use a light with a specific profile to stimulate the object you want to attract in a way that causes a scattering field such that there is a net force backward to the emitter (it only works if the amount of net forward momentum of the light is relatively small compared to the scattering).

The water stuff referenced by this article works on a completely different principle, though as described here.

They are similar in that they originate with a wave generator, also hitting the target at a glancing angle is a way to achieve the necessary conditions and both provide a net attractive force (aka tractor beam), but the physics is totally different.

about three weeks ago
top

Airbus Patents Windowless Cockpit That Would Increase Pilots' Field of View

slew Re:Would allow moving the cockpit. (468 comments)

I'll be [sure] some passengers would like that prime real estate.

In a commercial B747 (if you can find one still flying), where the cockpit would be on a single-decker plane, there is generally a passenger cabin with windows all the way to the nose (although no windows that face forward)... Although that used to be prime real-estate, it is generally relegated to economy-plus (business class and first class upstairs) as the market for premium seating has reduced...

FWIW, there's probably more to be gained by eliminating passenger windows like this Spike aerospace design, although I'd be interested to see how they get around the simulated parallax problem with their proposal...

about three weeks ago
top

Senate Budgetmakers Move To End US Participation In ITER

slew Re:Scientific research never got anyone anything (225 comments)

Actually, much of the goals of ITER isn't so much to research fusion (as much of that was done in the earlier projects like the TFTR project @Princeton, similarly the like the attempts to make Thorium fission reactors like MSRE wasn't to research fission).

ITER is basically a big material science / engineering experiment to see if it is possible to build a plasma containment vessel that withstand the neutron flux and estimate how much it will be to decommission such a beast thing later (after it becomes totally radioactive). Of course there's always the net energy problem (since TFTR never got to net energy), but for tokomak type reactors, this is complicated by magnetic containment power efficiency (can't let that plasma touch the wall) and the diverter architecture (how you clean the plasma of fusion products w/o shutting off the reactor). I don't think ITER is doing too much new research in this area (apparently mostly borrowing from other efforts like MAST, JET, Alcatore, etc)...

With ITER, apparently they aren't making great progress on any of these problems. Sometimes you just have to put a project out of it's misery and start over with a clean slate. I think ITER may have reached that point. Unfortunately, that means the follow-on DEMO project (the attempt to scale the ITER reactor to per-commercial size instead of research size). But obviously, if you don't have something that works, you can't scale it and everything may be a bit premature...

about a month ago
top

U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

slew slippery slope argument (1330 comments)

Everyone uses the slippery slope argument in politics and the media... Even on /.

IMO, this whole fuss on Plan B is kind of a crock. It costs about $50 at a drug store (you can get it over the counter and buy it with a downloadable $10-off coupon) with a $35 generic available. Comparatively, a birth control pill runs anywhere from $10-$100 (but mostly commonly hovers around $20 and mail order saves you about $5) and generally requires a prescription to be covered in a health plan (because they will make you mail order it to save money).

Don't know how often people would need to fork over for plan B out-of-pocket in a year, but I think if a person needed emergency contraception more than a couple times a year (out of 12 months) seems like that person probably should be looking at some other form of birth control, maybe? Of course if someone else is paying for it and such a person didn't have a moral problem with it, maybe people don't really care (but people *should* care because currently existing emergency contraception has quite a few serious side effects for those under 25 or have a high BMI which described a large part of the userbase for these drugs, but of course that's not part of the marketing material and no prescription or consultation is required).

FWIW you can't get aspirin/acetaminophen, cold symptom relief, or acne medicine covered as an over the counter medicine as part of a health plan (unless you get a prescription), but because of politics, emergency contraception has a special carveout in this market. Of course the generics available outside the USA (e.g, I-pill) is only about $10 a dose (about the same price as "emergency" Nyquil or Sudafed which your insurance company won't cover). On the other hand, insurance companies would probably gladly cover it gratis (since it's cheaper than pre-natal/pregnancy for them) and they already have this exact legal carveout for non-profits, but it's more fun to raise a stink and energize the base (on both sides of the aisle)...

about a month ago
top

Ninety-Nine Percent of the Ocean's Plastic Is Missing

slew assume it's dark (304 comments)

When you don't have an answer for the whereabouts of 90+% of the stuff your scientific theory calls for, call it dark and get some grant money to find it...

about a month ago
top

White House May Name Patent Reform Opponent As New Head of Patent Office

slew Ask a silly question... (211 comments)

What causes him to keep doing this?

Money.

But more seriously, this is one of the problems with electing a president with a short political CV/resume. His circle of trust doesn't have the critical mass of folks that can survive a vetting process (any than could have already got their job and gotten out after 4 years), so he has to rely on getting suggestions folks in an extended political operative/Washington insider circle which only knows people looking for a job from the pool perpetual bureaucratic lobbyist ruling class that's pretty much bought and sold themselves to the highest bidders...

about a month ago
top

Mayors of Atlanta & New Orleans: Uber Will Knock-Out Taxi Industry

slew Re:Good? (273 comments)

Hopefully we start evaluating laws that exist solely to prevent competition (Taxi cab franchise badges).

Are you willing to go so far as minimum wage and immigration laws? Most folks have a line to draw somewhere. Depending on your politics...

Usually when the paycheck of one's friends/neighbors line gets crossed, opinions start to shift. When it finally gets to your paycheck, that's often a bright red line for most folks... The mentality is like this: first they came...

about a month ago
top

California Legalizes Bitcoin

slew Re:Next step... (162 comments)

However, it shall be know in the state of California as CalCoin.

CalCoin will be exactly the same as BitCoin, except that there will be a un-elected, board of political appointees created to oversee CalCoin usage in the state. Each board member will collect a 6-figure salary (+travel expenses) to meet 2 times as year for 20-minutes. The board will oversee the writing and signature collection ballot proposition that amends the CalConstitution to enable it to collect of a surcharge tax on every CalCoin transaction by a CalResident to fund education and the construction of new prisons. Of course after spending millions of dollars on this, the ballot proposition will be declared unconstitutional and a lawsuit will then be filed to *out* the names and home addresses of everyone who signed the ballot initiative so that Anonymous CalCoin speculators can lynch them.

On the brighter side, since it will now be joining the "Cal" family of entities, perhaps CalPERS (Public Employee Retirement System) will now be able to "invest" in CalCoin. No doubt they will be able to crash its value like every other speculative investment scheme they have put money into for the last 20 years...

about a month ago
top

New Chemical Process Could Make Ammonia a Practical Car Fuel

slew Re:Cut the crap. What energy density/price ratio? (380 comments)

Interesting. The next question, of course, is "Can you scale it up to replace 160 exajoules of energy currently provided by 30 billion barrels a year of oil ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... ), or will it remain forever a niche player?"

Current world-wide ammonia production is mostly going to agriculture and is only about 130 million tonnes. 130Mt * 1000kg/t * 4318 Wh/kg * 3600J/Wh ~ 2 x10^15 Joules.

However, the goal is not to replace oil, but to replace gasoline for cars. Natural gas production, has plenty of scale (4.3Tm^3)*** and ammonia production generally scales easily with natural gas production. Also, only about 1/2 of oil production you quote is for gasoline for cars and trucks.

The question is if it is worth diverting natural gas to cars or not (vs converting it into electricity or using it for heating/cooking). Even if it was desirable, it's not an easy question on exactly how to do this because for cars, alternatives to ammonia production are to compress or liquefy natural gas (CNG/LNG). The benefit of ammonia is really is in industrial CO2 containment, but CNG/LNG would be easier to do at a large scale...

However, if there were an economical way to create ammonia from atmospheric Nitrogen w/o using Natural gas, there might be something to all of this... People are working on it, but nobody has got anything commercially viable yet...

***To convert natural gas to barrels of oil equivalent: 4.3Tm^3 * 1BOE / 170m^3 = 25MBOE

about a month ago
top

New Chemical Process Could Make Ammonia a Practical Car Fuel

slew Re:Cut the crap. What energy density/price ratio? (380 comments)

Although the energy density of ammonia is less than gasoline (about 1/2 as I recall), the efficiency of an internal combustion engine is like 20-30% where a fuel cell can be closer to 50-60%. It's probably a wash from that point of view...

The price of ammonia tracks that of natural gas (since it essentially all made via the Haber process). Right now natural gas is cheap relative to oil (thanks to all the fracking)..

On the plus side, using ammonia as fuel has the potential to reduce CO2 emissions. Since all the CO2 is happening in an industrial setting when natural gas it converted into ammonia instead of inside your internal combustion engine...

On the negative side, the biggest problem is what to do with all that Nitrogen. Any catalytic process isn't 100% efficient (I think they claim 60% up to 90%) and even if it was, it involves heating of the NH3 (up to 500C) which presumably creates hot N2 and H2. Developing a practical process that carries away the hot N2, but still prevents hot N2 from forming bonds with atmospheric oxygen creating NOx photochemical smog will be another challenge. This is a general problem with heating things up in the presence of air (which has both N2 and O2), but even worse with NH3. Photochemical smog in the form of NOx isn't technically a greenhouse gas (since it's atmospheric lifetime is generally short), but it is partially responsible for acid rain, so it isn't really a clear "green" option...

about a month ago
top

Workaholism In America Is Hurting the Economy

slew Re:I sleep less. (710 comments)

Unlikely. If my high school and college years are any indicator, the true alpha males (tm) lack the brain power to get jobs that could provide enough money.

You seem to be equating brain power with earning power. This is a common mistake made by folks who believe they likely have more than average brain power (tm) and that scarcity of those with brain power (tm) somehow improves earning power.

Today, earning power is most correlated with the amount of capital that your employment responsibilities have associated with. It may or may not be fair, but it is generally true. Historically, people could count on scarcity, but we're in the cusp of a post-scarcity employment environment (in many fields, there won't be enough work for everyone to be fully employed).

The best hope to earn an above average amount of money in a job is to find a company that has enough excess capital to pour some on their employees (e.g., work for a social media company, a hedge fund company, a natural resource processing company like an oil or rare-earth metals, etc.) or simply just work for yourself (start your own company). Although some positions in those companies might require brain power (tm), competition will be tough for those slots, and it's quite possible that it your "true-alpha-male" leader-type might find an easier way into such an excess capital situation (or say start a construction company and make plenty of money that way)...

about a month ago

Submissions

top

Japanese researchers build rock-paper-scissors robot that wins 100% of the time

slew slew writes  |  about 9 months ago

slew (2918) writes "Although the robot technically it cheats because it watches your hand and can recognize what shape you are intending to make and beat it before you even know what is happening. Apparently it takes about 60ms for you to shape your hand, but the robot can recognize the shape before it is completed, and only takes 20ms to counter your shape so the results appear to the human opponent to be virtually simultaneous.

I wonder how difficult it would be to add lizard and spock to the mix.... ;^)

Here is a paper with the details and a press account or two. There are videos in the links in case you want to see it in action."

Link to Original Source
top

Wait, isn't there a hole in the that wheel

slew slew writes  |  about 10 months ago

slew (2918) writes "Apparently after looking at some recent pictures from Curiosity's Hand Lens imager, someone spotted a hole in one of Curiosity's wheels. Unfortunatly, Mars is a long way from the nearest AAA, and the waranty on most aluminum wheels don't cover you if you decide to drive w/o tires, but apparently it's gonna be okay ;^)"
Link to Original Source
top

100% fail rate on Liberia University's admission exam

slew slew writes  |  about a year ago

slew (2918) writes "Apparently none of the 24K+ students who sat for the 2013 Liberia University entrance exam got a passing mark, and fewer than a hundred managed to pass the either the english (pass level 70%) or math (pass level 50%) sections required to qualify to be part of the normal class of 2k-3k students admitted every year...

Historically, the pass rate has been about 20-30% and in recent years, the test has been in multiple-guess format to facilitate grading. The mathematics exam generally focuses on arithmetic, geometry, algebra, analytical geometry and elementary statistic and probability; while the English exam generally focuses on grammar, sentence completion, reading comprehension and logical reasoning.

However, as a testatment to the over-hang of a civil war, university over-crowding, corruption, social promotion, the admission criteria was apparently temporarily dropped to 40% math and 50% english to allow the provisional admission of about 1.6K students. And people are calling foul..."
top

UC online courses' alarming growth rate

slew slew writes  |  about a year and a half ago

slew (2918) writes "In the shadow of Stanford and Harvard offering free on-line courses, The University of California has been attempting to offer pay-courses for credit. UC online took out a $6.9M loan from UC and spent $4.3M to market these courses. For their efforts, they've been able to quadruple their enrollment year over year.

The first year results: one person paid $1,400 for an online calculus class worth 4 credits. Now 4 people are signed up. Me thinks head will roll on this one..."

Link to Original Source
top

Stable Negative Temperature System Created

slew slew writes  |  about a year and a half ago

slew (2918) writes "Scientists at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich in Germany have created an actual stable system which has an inverted Boltzmann Distribution (aka, Negative Temperature) by using an intermediate bosonic Mott insulator together with a Feshbach resonance in bosonic Potassium with laser cooling.

Although Negative Temperature systems are not uncommon (a pumped laser creates them all the time), they are not usually stable as they are not in thermodynamic equilibrium (in the case of a laser, the high energy state couples to a lower energy state returning the system to a positive temperature realm).

Practical uses are of course far away (they only achieved a billionth of a Kelvin below absolute zero), but studying stable negative temperature systems may help us understand the mechanisms behind dark energy theories."

Link to Original Source
top

M-Carbon: 50yro mystery solved

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Unlike its more famous carbon cousins: diamonds and fullerenes, you've probably never heard of M-Carbon, but this form of compressed graphite which is as hard as diamonds has baffled researcher for half a century. Over the past few years, many theoretical computations have suggested at least a dozen different crystal structures for this phase of carbon, but new experiments showed that only one crystal structure fits the data: M-carbon."
Link to Original Source
top

the ultimate accessory: iphone case stun-gun

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "In case you aren't in the loop, this army-reservist came up with this limited edition case for the iphone that doubles as a 650K volt stun-gun. He apparently came up with the idea after being a victim of a home invasion robbery attempt...

Bonus: the stun-gun battery pack can give an extra 20 hours of life to the iPhone if you aren't stunning anyone"

Link to Original Source
top

Scientists capture shadow cast by 1 atom

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Scientist at Griffith University have shown the first absorption image of a single atom isolated in a vacuum. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens.

They predict this absorbption imaging technique should prove useful in quantum information processing and using the minimum amount of illumination for bio-imaging of light-sensitive samples.

Here's a pointer to the paper..."

Link to Original Source
top

Uniformed individuals promote democratic consensus in animal groups

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Although this isn't "new" research, I just saw this presentation at a GPU Technology Conference keynote. The gist of this research is that a well functioning democracy (a group that is nominally controlled by the numerical majority) seems to require a minimum number of uninfomed or weak-preference individuals to avoid manipulation by a strongly opinionated minority. If this is true, perhaps electing a certain percentage of spin-less clue-less flip-flopping people as legistative representatives instead of all partisan opinionated intransigents is the evolutionary prefered path to take? Nah!"
Link to Original Source
top

photovoltaic powered retinal prosthetic

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Although it hasn't been tested on humans yet, stanford researchers have created a new type of retinal prosthetic that is photovoltaic powered. The gist is that external googles convert an image into infrared light and that light conveys both the image and the power for the retinal implant which means no batteries, or bulky induction coils are required for the retinal implant. This should allow for higher resolution implant (the experimental device has 176 pixels where in contrast the currently available retinal implant from SecondSight is about 60 pixels and requires a bulky inductive antenna). Might be a while till we get to a bionic eye, but this should be quite a help for the sight challenged among us."
Link to Original Source
top

GraphExeter for better solar cells.

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Transparent conducting films are a very important part of photoelectric cells and display panels like OLEDS. Unfortunatly, the currently best known material Indium Tin Oxide (aka ITO) is a rare and expensive and much better performing than it's cheaper subsitute (aluminium zinc oxide AZO). Carbon nanotubes thin-films have been considered, but are current limited by sheet resistance. A research group from University of Exeter has created a new Few-Layered graphene (FLG) w/Ferric Chloride "sandwich" which helps to limit the sheet resistance w/o affecting the transparency. If this type of material becomes practical, it could be a good replacement for ITO (which some say economical supplies will run out soon ~2017)."
Link to Original Source
top

Massive rise in myopia

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "According to this recent study submitted to lancet, an alarming 80-90% of students in east Asian cities have myopia. The study speculates that the culture of educational pressure combined with reduced exposure to outdoor light have conspired to create this epidemic. This conclusion was drawn from a recent retrospective study at cambridge which correlated extra hours outdoors with reduced chance of myopia (~2% drop for each additional hour per week spent out-of-doors)."
Link to Original Source
top

electron's 3rd "quasi-particle (aka "orbiton") observed in insulator lattice

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Although electrons are usually thought of having 2 properties: spin and charge, bound electrons actually have a 3rd quantum property related to their so-called orbit's angular momentum. Spinon and holon quasi-particles have been observed before which represent the spin and charge quantum values of the electron. Now this experiment takes advantage of the fact that nominally bound electrons can delocalize in a lattice into energy bands and make it possible to measure the effect of the orbiton quasi-particles (which has the value of the electron's angular momentum where it was originally nominally bound, even though now delocalized). Hope that made some sense..."
Link to Original Source
top

bottoms up! drinking buckyballs apparently fountain of youth

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "As if buckyballs weren't miraculous enough, apparently researchers at Université Paris Sud in France have discovered that rats that drink C60 (fullerene) dissolved in olive oil can live twice as long (by reducing age associated oxidative stress)"
Link to Original Source
top

Pockets in graphene layers allow viewing of liquids with an electron microscope

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Looking at liquids w/ a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to observe things like crystal growth has been difficult to do. This is because liquids need to be confined to a capsule to view them in a TEM (because the electrons are flying at the sample in a chamber near vaccuum pressures where liquids would evaporate or sublimate). Traditional capsules of Silicon Oxide or Silicon Nitride have been fairly opaque. This paper describes a new technique with a "pocket" created between two graphene layers which can hold liquids for observation by a TEM and the graphene is apparently much more transparent than previous materials allowing a better view of the processes (like crystalization), taking place in the liquid. Here's non-paywalled summary article..."
Link to Original Source
top

US Supreme Court Rules that Congress can take work

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Ironically, today of all days, the US Supreme court decided that congress was within its authority to grant new and/or restored copyright protection to preexisting works to comply with copyright treaties. This effectively takes works mainly authored between 1923 and 1989 that had been in the public domain, out of the public domain. This is in a majority opinion written by Justice Ginsburg which can be read here

In a disenting opinion authored by Justices Breyer and Alito voices the view that this "does not serve copyright's traditional public ends, namely the creation of monetary awards that motivate the create activity of authors", but only grants its restored copyrights only to works already produced.

The original suite was that the way that congress complied with the copyright treaty was overbroad (e.g., the Berne convention allowed restricted terms for works of restored copyrights to account for the disruption it might cause, but congress gave blanket restoration for all works)

Interesting, if disappointing, reading..."

Link to Original Source
top

A new kind of metal theorized to be in the earth's

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "This article talks about a study accepted to Physical Review Letters that theorizes that Iron oxide goes through an insulator/metal phase change with high temperature and pressure. Originally it was thought to be a crystalline structure change, but now apparently it is theorized to be a new type of metallic state. This discovery might offer new insight on how the earth's magnetic field operates."
Link to Original Source
top

Scientists create formula for perfect parking

slew slew writes  |  more than 4 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Okay, so for the owners of the new self-parking prius, this might be obsolete, but for the rest of us car-challenged geeks, someone has gone through the trouble to figure out if that parallel parking space is gonna work or not (or if we have to give one of the cars a "love-tap" to snuggle in there)"
Link to Original Source
top

Fart to lower blood pressure?

slew slew writes  |  more than 5 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Apparently there's a study that if a mouse has a genetic anomoly so it doesn't make H2S (the same chemical as stinky fart gas) it tends to exhibit hypertension (precursor to high blood pressure) and have a reduced ability for vasorelaxation. So if your blood pressure is up, maybe the solution is eat a burrito and pass some gas. I know I feel better when I do.... ;^) Strangely the study author seem to compare their finding to the ground breaking nitric oxide findings (which lead to the discovery of viagra). I'd love to see the adverts for a blood pressure reducing drug that results from this research ;^)"

Journals

slew has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...