×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Nokia Had a Production-Ready Web Tablet 13 Years Ago

slew Re:The real lesson (243 comments)

Apple wasn't the pioneer, don't you remember the Altair and IMSAI?
Windows wasn't the pioneer, don't you remember Kildall's Digital Research CPM/86 and IBM/Microsoft OS/2 collaboration?

The real lesson? Let other do the pioneering market research for you. Then do it better and faster than they can...

Historically, first mover advantage often isn't what it's hyped up to be (ask CompuServe, AltaVista, Yahoo, MySpace, and AOL/Netscape)...

2 days ago
top

Nokia Had a Production-Ready Web Tablet 13 Years Ago

slew Re:Nokia destroyed tablet, M$ destroyed Nokia (243 comments)

Nokia creates tablet.
Nokia destroys tablet.
M$ destroys Nokia.
M$ creates a tablet.
A tablet destroys M$.
Linux inherits the earth?

2 days ago
top

IRS Can Now Seize Your Tax Refund To Pay a Relative's Debt

slew Re:The US needs a constitution (629 comments)

Yet, you don't get to choose a Apple laptop with an AMD instead of and Intel processor, a Samsung handheld computer with an A7 processor instead of a Exanos or Qualcomm. In life, things come in sub-optimal bundles and you pick your poison.

The problem is that we often only have a few choices even in a commodity market because of economies of scale. The economics of spending billions of dollars to develop high performances CPUs have dwindled the field to a majority player and a consolation player. Likewise, in the US, there aren't an excess political resources to fund billion dollar campaigns where only 1 person wins, so there is only about 1.1 political parties. When you scale things back you get more diversity, (e.g., local politics or SoC chips), but at the top of the food chain, it's not much freedom and not much service...

3 days ago
top

CSIRO Scientists' Aquaculture Holy Grail: Fish-Free Prawn Food

slew wrong analogy (116 comments)

Imagine trillions of years from now on a planet far-far away, some technician named Vort assembling computer subroutines from a small number of libraries (known as the Legacy code) that dropped from a space probe billions of years before he was born.

Vort's creating "organic" software to get one of his jobs done, one that's just like Vort's ancestors created using these well-known components that always seemed to do the job. It's really expensive to assemble components this way because the Legacy codes are very inefficient, and you need to string together lots of calls to get all the requirements you need for the job, but it's known to be a sustainable process and even if nobody understands it, Legacy code doesn't have any "secret ingredients".

Back a few decades ago, Vort recalls there where two movements that tried to change the way code was assembled to get a job done:

One was to actually modify software to have it do what you wanted it to do, but the purveyors of this black magic were evil companies that wanted to keep these modifications to themselves and you could never be sure what type of modification they made or what side effects they had.

The other group was called the Open movement which wrote all new code free of the original Legacy libraries, but offered them to everyone so that they could see for themselves. Sadly although there were many experts among the Open group, normal users of open code did not have the expertise to validate the new code so it was just as mysterious as the Legacy code. Contrary to popular belief, the new open code has been used at most less than 10 years (meaning tested less than 25 years), the Legacy code has been tested for 1000's of years...

Nope, Vort, will continue to use the original Legacy code. None of that modified code for Vort, also, none of that open code created from scratch. Vort would continue to use Legacy code...

FTFY, you may be an OPEN code advocate, but you are a LEGACY food advocate, not an OPEN food advocate.

5 days ago
top

GM Names Names, Suspends Two Engineers Over Ignition-Switch Safety

slew Re:Professional responsibility (236 comments)

I'm an engineer but I don't have a PE license so what kind of "professional responsibility" am I supposed to have? The answer is none.

In a few localities, it is actually illegal** to call yourself an engineer or offer engineering services if you don't actually have a PE license (akin to practicing medicine or law w/o a license even if you graduated from medical or law school).

However, the odds are you probably don't live in one of the few remaining localities that have these restrictions on the use of "engineer" in a job title, but you should be aware that in most localities, simply by practicing engineering often puts you under the jurisdiction of the local board and local/state boards usually have some rules for people that are "exempt" from licensing, but able to practice the profession. Therefore, even if you are not required to be licensed, you might have some professional responsibilities, you may simply be ignorant of what they are (and ignorance of the law is generally not a valid excuse in a court of law).

**About 20 years ago, I was working for a company that was bought by another company headquartered in another state where it was illegal to have the word "engineer" in a job title w/o that person being a licensed P.E. A year after the merger, the company was cited by the state board as employing non-engineers w/ engineering titles and as part of the penalty/settlement was forced to change the job titles of nearly everyone in my department (e.g, from applications engineer to technician level 3, or from engineering team manager to technical team manager). I remember one of the newly minted technician level 3s disagreed with this decision and stupidly quit in protest.

About a year later, the state changed the rules slightly where we were allowed to be called application engineers again (because apparently a large electronics industry employer based in the state convinced the state board it was generally known that mere applications-engineers weren't allowed to sign-off on actual designs). Of course, for a job title that was say a lead engineer, or principal engineer or a partner engineer, I think many of those still require being P.E. Licensed.

about a week ago
top

Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

slew Re:this again... (291 comments)

Today, the two pesky loose ends that are likely to change everything are dark matter and dark energy. What we need is a theory that explains these phenomena and an experiment to test the theory.

If it turns out we need astrophysical levels of dark energy to initiate such an experiment, maybe you'll forgive me if I take a few steps back...

about a week ago
top

Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

slew Re:Heinrich Hertz - 1875 (291 comments)

Wow, he invented the rental car way back in 1875 !

FWIW: Sandor Herz (aka John Hertz) wasn't born until 1879, but he was friends with Edward Teller (Mr H-bomb) and funded lots of research (mostly defense related). BTW, Sandor didn't invent the rental car idea that bears his name, but he did found the yellow-cab company...

Here is one of Sandor's most popular quotes...

I’d like to hire a ship and send back to their own countries the men who are complaining about American conditions and American institutions. Every one of these fellows has a better opportunity here to lead a happy and prosperous life than he had in his own country, wherever it may have been. The best thing that ever happened to me was that my father went broke in the mountains north of Buda-Pest and decided to make a new start in this country. I came here as a foreigner, and this country not only tolerated but encouraged me. It will do the same for every other immigrant who is willing to work to succeed.

about a week ago
top

Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

slew Re:Until warp drive is invented... (291 comments)

Although your theory is neat and clean, the reality is probably different.

When things get too neat and clean, there are diminishing returns. Sciences stagnate under reduced funding, industries consolidate which cause trade secrets proliferate reducing the velocity of discoveries. When the situation is less ordered in the world (say after a war), the pace of discovery during rebuilding is greatly advanced.

Sometimes a tear down of some old stuff to make room for the latest shiny stuff. Thinking of a non-eventful plateau period waiting for some new Einstein to be born is a very sanitized way to think about it. Sometimes it takes a rebirth after a major world war.

Ironically (or perhaps fortunately), this reality isn't likely to be an efficient way to stimulate a renaissance in discoveries (as the net cost of wars generally put the whole thing in the red due to the effects captured in the parable/fallacy of the broken window).

Maybe it means we are often simply a complacent species that perhaps needs to be kicked in butt occasionally...
Or, maybe it just means that comparing the rate at two isolated points in history isn't the best measure of the pace progress.

Then again, excluding folks that like to draw graphs that linear extrapolate to the right in a hockey stick and have never heard of a double logistic function, there might be some other ways for statistical experts to interpret this data...

about a week ago
top

Google: Teach Girls Coding, Get $2,500; Teach Boys, Get $0

slew Re:Sex discrimination. (673 comments)

Offering incentives to get people to work in areas out of their comfort zone or to get people to teach others so they can enter an area out of their comfort zone should not be discouraged.

That would be like offering free housing to police in a slum area to bring attention to problems in the inner city.

Actually, in the current US economy, it would be more like offering incentives to women to get into the fracking industry... (don't read that f-word wrong)

about a week ago
top

Google: Teach Girls Coding, Get $2,500; Teach Boys, Get $0

slew Re:Sex discrimination. (673 comments)

FWIW, the idea of group/collective guilt (bullshit or not) is not simply a mantra of a victim lobby or a group of rabid Tumblr feminazis, it is likely simply just a higher degree of expression of a generic sociological/psychological human behavior.

Interestingly people with the lowest degrees of expression of these types of human behavior tends to suggest those people might be borderline psychopaths that don't feel any empathy at all or perhaps exhibiting behavior associated with repression and/or projection (e.g., blame the victims).

As with most things in life, a happy medium...

about a week ago
top

Navy Creates Fuel From Seawater

slew So, they evolved to flourish under AGW? (256 comments)

I wonder if they are effectively taking advantage of the the current concentration of dissolved CO2 to operate efficiently (e.g, if we hadn't burned up all those hydrocarbons and acidified the ocean), or are there enough natural CO2 to extract to make this a worthwhile endeavor?

about a week ago
top

Mozilla CEO Firestorm Likely Violated California Law

slew Re:Fuck him and the rest of the Republicans (1109 comments)

Yep, sure is. Ever filled out a job application that asked if you were a fascist or a communist?

Although I'm not old enough to have had an application that asked if I was ever a member of a communist party, a colleague of mine is old enough and once when I was over at his house, he showed me the carbon-copy of such an application he filled out...

Oh yeah, that was an application for a US government civil service job (not military, or top-secret), although he told me that was a common question on many Job applications of the day (he said the grocery packer job he applied for had the same question, although he didn't have any actual proof of that in hand).

about two weeks ago
top

Mozilla CEO Firestorm Likely Violated California Law

slew Re:Bu the wasn't fired (1109 comments)

IANAL, but it is my understanding, there are sometimes some quasi-legal or even illegal elements in many severance package. At least in California...

.. you cannot sign away your rights to disclose fraud, or other illegal activities

.. you cannot waive federal or state employment discrimination claims including FMLA and Older workers protection act

.. you cannot agree to terms that violate public policy (maybe fostering a culture of intimidation about political beliefs or perhaps related to the law that firing people based on their political beliefs?)

I'm sure the lawyers writing the damn things up attempt to tip-toe around these potholes, to make it non-obvious to the recipient of the severance agreement or at least make them think twice about disclosing certain things, though. My guess that in this case, there is probably just an "understanding" that he wouldn't push the issue any more, but I don't think that a company can simply have an employee sign-away a company's legal liability in an employee severance package, because that appears to me that any such clauses of the contract would not actually be enforceable (at least in California).

about two weeks ago
top

New Service Lets You Hitch a Ride With Private Planes For Cost of Tank of Gas

slew Re:Potential FAA issues (269 comments)

One potential loophole is to attempt to use the exemption (91.321 Carriage of candidates in elections)...

Say, have any potential passengers sign up to be candidates in an election for some public office (create a town in the middle of nowhere called 'Airpool' and everyone who signs up to run for mayor is now part of the club where they can access flight sharing).

Of course these folks aren't doing that, but there are of course probably some more realistic loophole in the code...

about two weeks ago
top

State Colleges May Offer Best ROI On Comp Sci Degrees

slew Re:Most undergrad educations are the same (127 comments)

Maybe, most undergrad educations are the same, but a degree from Harvard says you got accepted to Harvard.

There was a follow-up study (Dale-Kruger) to a interesting study a while back that more-or-less concluded it's more important that you apply to Ivy school, but even if you don't get in, still go to a decent school. Krueger and Dale found that for students bright enough to win admission to a top school, later income "varied little, no matter which type of college they attended." In other words, the student, not the school, was responsible for the success.

In fact the data actually suggested that it didn't even mater that much if you even were admitted into that elite school, only that you had the ego/self-confidence to apply to an elite school.

about two weeks ago
top

Supreme Court Skeptical of Computer-Based Patents

slew Re:The best the SCOTUS could do is wipe software p (192 comments)

AFAIK, There is no "trade-secret" law to weaken that is independent of misappropriation of business information through theft, bribery, misrepresentation, breach or inducement of a breach of a duty to maintain secrecy, or espionage.

Note that a trade-secret is not protected from reverse engineering and is limited in time until it is common knowledge to the people that could use it profitably.

about two weeks ago
top

Facebook Buying Oculus VR For $2 Billion

slew Re:Kickstarter is not an investment (535 comments)

Couldn't Kickstarter just act as the majority investor and vote based on a poll of people who contributed?

So Kickstarter becomes the sole investor, with a 51% share or whatever of voting power, they put up a poll to all who contributed saying "Should we allow the Facebook acquisition?" and if 70% of contributors say no, Kickstarter blocks it?

Yes kickstarter could change their charter to do this, but I'm guessing they don't want to because under most state laws, being a mutually-owned company, they would be on the hook to seek/verify *accurate* information about the companies that they invest in and potentially provide some of that information to the (non-accredited) investors. Instead Kickstarter does not seek and does not provide information. Information is provided simply by the project directly to the backers often simply through unverified facebook accounts. Kickstarter is not involved in any way in the information loop and I doubt they want to be so as to encourage a large number of projects and to keep their butts out of the litigation chairs.

GSV is an example of a closed-end mutual fund company that did something like this. The problem as I mentioned is that the investors are not investing in the companies like Facebook, but in GSV. It would be like investing in Kickstarter, not Oculus. For ever Oculus, there are inevitably duds, and this is why closed-end mutual fund companies like have a pretty poor performance record.

New regulations are being drafted that might change the landscape of crowdfunding over the next few years, but reducing reporting requirements for investments under the $500 level and allowing for more solicitation/advertising. Who knows, maybe if the regulations are liberal enough some organization like kickstarter might take that plunge (but I doubt it). Remember, with this route, you don't get rewards, you get equity and with startup ventures, often equity is less valuable than toilet paper. For example, the "c-level" staff of a startup venture for instance could take a business trip to Hawaii with your funds as a team building exercise and it's likely you wouldn't be the wiser... There's a reason that they restrict this stuff to sophisticated investors that have staff to audit finances and select key management staff and board members.

about three weeks ago
top

Mt. Gox Working With Japanese Cops; Creditors Want CEO To Testify In US

slew Re:Yeah right... (62 comments)

What Mt. Gox did was not fraud in the US because they were not operating in the US as a bank, only as a money services business which is mostly only concerned with reporting to prevent money-laundering.

What Mt. Gox did was not yet fraud in Japan because they claim it to be theft (someone stole their bitcoins) and there are currently no regulated monetary reserve requirements for such an enterprise (e.g., the mere fact that they didn't hold the bitcoins doesn't constitute fraud). However, it could turn out to be fraud, if it wasn't really theft and they did something fishy and didn't tell anyone.

Even if Mt. Gox was a bank, just because someone bank employee is embezzling money from a bank and if the bank knows this doesn't tell anyone for a month and the bank eventually declares bankruptcy, doesn't necessarily make it fraud (even if they continue to take deposits during this time). It all depends on when the bank knew they were insolvent, not when they knew they lost some money...

If you want a car analogy, you shouldn't generally willing hand over your car to someone that is judgment proof (e.g, no assets, no insurance), because if they lose the car, unfortunately, you are the one that has lost the car... You might try to assert that they fraudulently tricked you out of your car, but that's a loser case...

about three weeks ago
top

Facebook Buying Oculus VR For $2 Billion

slew Re:Kickstarter is not an investment (535 comments)

AFAIK, SEC regulation do not strictly prevent companies from selling unregistered shares to unaccredited investors.
Rules 505 and 506 allows a company to sell unregistered shares to up to 35 unaccredited investors (and an unlimited number of accredited investors). This limit of 35 unaccredited investors is the thing that kickstarter bumps up against.

However, there is another way to do this. It is actually possible to start a "closed-end" registered investment company (like a mutual fund company) that can invest in startup companies as an accredited investor. This investment company could accept money from unaccredited investors and this money can be invested in some startup companies.

Sadly, the track record of such companies is pretty poor.

For a recent example, consider GSV which was able to use this strategy to allow unaccredited investors to put money into Facebook, Groupon, and Zynga before they went public. The problem is that the liquid value of closed-end fund, is not the value of the underlying securities, but the resale value of your share in the investment company. This is because in a closed end fund, you have to sell your share in the investment company to someone else (the fund won't buy it back from you). In the GSV case, the share value of GSV was driven up by the promise of getting in on a pre-ipo Facebook investment, but it then crashed when the Facebook ipo didn't perform as well as expected.

about three weeks ago
top

IRS: Bitcoin Is Property, Not Currency

slew Re:This seems like good news (273 comments)

Also you can sell $3001 worth of bitcoins to your friend in some other country for $1 .. and well, what happens next is unknown.

Actually, it's not the amount of money you sell your property for, it's what the "fair market value" is at the time of sale.

Just like the stock that you give to your friend in some other country, you must report the "loss" relative to the FMV from some well known exchange (say like a quote on the close of day of Nasdaq if the stock was listed there). Since there (still) exists some well known exchanges for Bitcoin, I imagine that it would be prudent to use a well established FMV for bitcoin as well..

Of course you could just manufacture your own Bitcoin FMV on your date of sale and use that as the basis of your "loss" report to the IRS on your tax return instead. .. and well, what happens next is unknown.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

top

Japanese researchers build rock-paper-scissors robot that wins 100% of the time

slew slew writes  |  about 5 months ago

slew (2918) writes "Although the robot technically it cheats because it watches your hand and can recognize what shape you are intending to make and beat it before you even know what is happening. Apparently it takes about 60ms for you to shape your hand, but the robot can recognize the shape before it is completed, and only takes 20ms to counter your shape so the results appear to the human opponent to be virtually simultaneous.

I wonder how difficult it would be to add lizard and spock to the mix.... ;^)

Here is a paper with the details and a press account or two. There are videos in the links in case you want to see it in action."

Link to Original Source
top

Wait, isn't there a hole in the that wheel

slew slew writes  |  about 6 months ago

slew (2918) writes "Apparently after looking at some recent pictures from Curiosity's Hand Lens imager, someone spotted a hole in one of Curiosity's wheels. Unfortunatly, Mars is a long way from the nearest AAA, and the waranty on most aluminum wheels don't cover you if you decide to drive w/o tires, but apparently it's gonna be okay ;^)"
Link to Original Source
top

100% fail rate on Liberia University's admission exam

slew slew writes  |  about 8 months ago

slew (2918) writes "Apparently none of the 24K+ students who sat for the 2013 Liberia University entrance exam got a passing mark, and fewer than a hundred managed to pass the either the english (pass level 70%) or math (pass level 50%) sections required to qualify to be part of the normal class of 2k-3k students admitted every year...

Historically, the pass rate has been about 20-30% and in recent years, the test has been in multiple-guess format to facilitate grading. The mathematics exam generally focuses on arithmetic, geometry, algebra, analytical geometry and elementary statistic and probability; while the English exam generally focuses on grammar, sentence completion, reading comprehension and logical reasoning.

However, as a testatment to the over-hang of a civil war, university over-crowding, corruption, social promotion, the admission criteria was apparently temporarily dropped to 40% math and 50% english to allow the provisional admission of about 1.6K students. And people are calling foul..."
top

UC online courses' alarming growth rate

slew slew writes  |  about a year ago

slew (2918) writes "In the shadow of Stanford and Harvard offering free on-line courses, The University of California has been attempting to offer pay-courses for credit. UC online took out a $6.9M loan from UC and spent $4.3M to market these courses. For their efforts, they've been able to quadruple their enrollment year over year.

The first year results: one person paid $1,400 for an online calculus class worth 4 credits. Now 4 people are signed up. Me thinks head will roll on this one..."

Link to Original Source
top

Stable Negative Temperature System Created

slew slew writes  |  about a year ago

slew (2918) writes "Scientists at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich in Germany have created an actual stable system which has an inverted Boltzmann Distribution (aka, Negative Temperature) by using an intermediate bosonic Mott insulator together with a Feshbach resonance in bosonic Potassium with laser cooling.

Although Negative Temperature systems are not uncommon (a pumped laser creates them all the time), they are not usually stable as they are not in thermodynamic equilibrium (in the case of a laser, the high energy state couples to a lower energy state returning the system to a positive temperature realm).

Practical uses are of course far away (they only achieved a billionth of a Kelvin below absolute zero), but studying stable negative temperature systems may help us understand the mechanisms behind dark energy theories."

Link to Original Source
top

M-Carbon: 50yro mystery solved

slew slew writes  |  about a year and a half ago

slew (2918) writes "Unlike its more famous carbon cousins: diamonds and fullerenes, you've probably never heard of M-Carbon, but this form of compressed graphite which is as hard as diamonds has baffled researcher for half a century. Over the past few years, many theoretical computations have suggested at least a dozen different crystal structures for this phase of carbon, but new experiments showed that only one crystal structure fits the data: M-carbon."
Link to Original Source
top

the ultimate accessory: iphone case stun-gun

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "In case you aren't in the loop, this army-reservist came up with this limited edition case for the iphone that doubles as a 650K volt stun-gun. He apparently came up with the idea after being a victim of a home invasion robbery attempt...

Bonus: the stun-gun battery pack can give an extra 20 hours of life to the iPhone if you aren't stunning anyone"

Link to Original Source
top

Scientists capture shadow cast by 1 atom

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Scientist at Griffith University have shown the first absorption image of a single atom isolated in a vacuum. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens.

They predict this absorbption imaging technique should prove useful in quantum information processing and using the minimum amount of illumination for bio-imaging of light-sensitive samples.

Here's a pointer to the paper..."

Link to Original Source
top

Uniformed individuals promote democratic consensus in animal groups

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Although this isn't "new" research, I just saw this presentation at a GPU Technology Conference keynote. The gist of this research is that a well functioning democracy (a group that is nominally controlled by the numerical majority) seems to require a minimum number of uninfomed or weak-preference individuals to avoid manipulation by a strongly opinionated minority. If this is true, perhaps electing a certain percentage of spin-less clue-less flip-flopping people as legistative representatives instead of all partisan opinionated intransigents is the evolutionary prefered path to take? Nah!"
Link to Original Source
top

photovoltaic powered retinal prosthetic

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Although it hasn't been tested on humans yet, stanford researchers have created a new type of retinal prosthetic that is photovoltaic powered. The gist is that external googles convert an image into infrared light and that light conveys both the image and the power for the retinal implant which means no batteries, or bulky induction coils are required for the retinal implant. This should allow for higher resolution implant (the experimental device has 176 pixels where in contrast the currently available retinal implant from SecondSight is about 60 pixels and requires a bulky inductive antenna). Might be a while till we get to a bionic eye, but this should be quite a help for the sight challenged among us."
Link to Original Source
top

GraphExeter for better solar cells.

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Transparent conducting films are a very important part of photoelectric cells and display panels like OLEDS. Unfortunatly, the currently best known material Indium Tin Oxide (aka ITO) is a rare and expensive and much better performing than it's cheaper subsitute (aluminium zinc oxide AZO). Carbon nanotubes thin-films have been considered, but are current limited by sheet resistance. A research group from University of Exeter has created a new Few-Layered graphene (FLG) w/Ferric Chloride "sandwich" which helps to limit the sheet resistance w/o affecting the transparency. If this type of material becomes practical, it could be a good replacement for ITO (which some say economical supplies will run out soon ~2017)."
Link to Original Source
top

Massive rise in myopia

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "According to this recent study submitted to lancet, an alarming 80-90% of students in east Asian cities have myopia. The study speculates that the culture of educational pressure combined with reduced exposure to outdoor light have conspired to create this epidemic. This conclusion was drawn from a recent retrospective study at cambridge which correlated extra hours outdoors with reduced chance of myopia (~2% drop for each additional hour per week spent out-of-doors)."
Link to Original Source
top

electron's 3rd "quasi-particle (aka "orbiton") observed in insulator lattice

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Although electrons are usually thought of having 2 properties: spin and charge, bound electrons actually have a 3rd quantum property related to their so-called orbit's angular momentum. Spinon and holon quasi-particles have been observed before which represent the spin and charge quantum values of the electron. Now this experiment takes advantage of the fact that nominally bound electrons can delocalize in a lattice into energy bands and make it possible to measure the effect of the orbiton quasi-particles (which has the value of the electron's angular momentum where it was originally nominally bound, even though now delocalized). Hope that made some sense..."
Link to Original Source
top

bottoms up! drinking buckyballs apparently fountain of youth

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "As if buckyballs weren't miraculous enough, apparently researchers at Université Paris Sud in France have discovered that rats that drink C60 (fullerene) dissolved in olive oil can live twice as long (by reducing age associated oxidative stress)"
Link to Original Source
top

Pockets in graphene layers allow viewing of liquids with an electron microscope

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Looking at liquids w/ a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to observe things like crystal growth has been difficult to do. This is because liquids need to be confined to a capsule to view them in a TEM (because the electrons are flying at the sample in a chamber near vaccuum pressures where liquids would evaporate or sublimate). Traditional capsules of Silicon Oxide or Silicon Nitride have been fairly opaque. This paper describes a new technique with a "pocket" created between two graphene layers which can hold liquids for observation by a TEM and the graphene is apparently much more transparent than previous materials allowing a better view of the processes (like crystalization), taking place in the liquid. Here's non-paywalled summary article..."
Link to Original Source
top

US Supreme Court Rules that Congress can take work

slew slew writes  |  about 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Ironically, today of all days, the US Supreme court decided that congress was within its authority to grant new and/or restored copyright protection to preexisting works to comply with copyright treaties. This effectively takes works mainly authored between 1923 and 1989 that had been in the public domain, out of the public domain. This is in a majority opinion written by Justice Ginsburg which can be read here

In a disenting opinion authored by Justices Breyer and Alito voices the view that this "does not serve copyright's traditional public ends, namely the creation of monetary awards that motivate the create activity of authors", but only grants its restored copyrights only to works already produced.

The original suite was that the way that congress complied with the copyright treaty was overbroad (e.g., the Berne convention allowed restricted terms for works of restored copyrights to account for the disruption it might cause, but congress gave blanket restoration for all works)

Interesting, if disappointing, reading..."

Link to Original Source
top

A new kind of metal theorized to be in the earth's

slew slew writes  |  more than 2 years ago

slew (2918) writes "This article talks about a study accepted to Physical Review Letters that theorizes that Iron oxide goes through an insulator/metal phase change with high temperature and pressure. Originally it was thought to be a crystalline structure change, but now apparently it is theorized to be a new type of metallic state. This discovery might offer new insight on how the earth's magnetic field operates."
Link to Original Source
top

Scientists create formula for perfect parking

slew slew writes  |  more than 4 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Okay, so for the owners of the new self-parking prius, this might be obsolete, but for the rest of us car-challenged geeks, someone has gone through the trouble to figure out if that parallel parking space is gonna work or not (or if we have to give one of the cars a "love-tap" to snuggle in there)"
Link to Original Source
top

Fart to lower blood pressure?

slew slew writes  |  more than 5 years ago

slew (2918) writes "Apparently there's a study that if a mouse has a genetic anomoly so it doesn't make H2S (the same chemical as stinky fart gas) it tends to exhibit hypertension (precursor to high blood pressure) and have a reduced ability for vasorelaxation. So if your blood pressure is up, maybe the solution is eat a burrito and pass some gas. I know I feel better when I do.... ;^) Strangely the study author seem to compare their finding to the ground breaking nitric oxide findings (which lead to the discovery of viagra). I'd love to see the adverts for a blood pressure reducing drug that results from this research ;^)"

Journals

slew has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...