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Incandescent Bulbs Get a Reprieve

smagruder Bad Idea (767 comments)

We needed to go ahead and bite the bullet on this one. All that wasted energy, continuing, is so stupid in these times of necessary conservation and dealing with climate change.

I hope all the energy wasters enjoy their free/dumb! (and higher energy bills than those of us who smartly made the switch)

about 3 months ago
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Alan Turing Pardoned

smagruder Justice (415 comments)

If this man's life provided the full rationale for gay rights, it would be enough.

about 4 months ago
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Campaign To Kill CAPTCHA Kicks Off

smagruder Re:stupid (558 comments)

Not if you employed other technical measures. Search around a bit and you'll find captchas are unnecessary.

about 9 months ago
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Campaign To Kill CAPTCHA Kicks Off

smagruder Re:stupid (558 comments)

There are plenty of other technical measures available these days. Captchas are unnecessary.

about 9 months ago
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Campaign To Kill CAPTCHA Kicks Off

smagruder Re:stupid (558 comments)

Tell that to my 46-y.o. eyes that can barely decipher these increasingly difficult eye puzzles, and I have a computer engineering degree. Think about others, will you?

about 9 months ago
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Mayer Terminates Yahoo's Remote Employee Policy

smagruder Re:I've worked with good and bad remote workers (524 comments)

So I guess you don't hire humans who have to take potty breaks? egads

Besides, under U.S. law, employees get 15 minutes of break for every four hours of work.

about a year ago
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Mayer Terminates Yahoo's Remote Employee Policy

smagruder Re:bullet in the head (524 comments)

I think we rationally know in advance that this is a bad idea.

about a year ago
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Mayer Terminates Yahoo's Remote Employee Policy

smagruder Re: At your desk! (524 comments)

But you assume his job was to service questions from other organizations rather than do the job he was hired to do. How do you expect an employee to get their assignments done if they are crazily distracted all the time?

about a year ago
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Mayer Terminates Yahoo's Remote Employee Policy

smagruder Re:It depends (524 comments)

Are all programmers strawmen to you, sir?

about a year ago
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Mayer Terminates Yahoo's Remote Employee Policy

smagruder Re:It depends (524 comments)

I don't know who you're responding to specifically, but I say "Right on brother!"

I've been in jobs where I've had a manager accuse me of things in a personal, familiar way that had nothing to do with the reality of doing the job. Some managers actually get in the way of people getting their job done. That's just a fact of many jobs, and it would be nice if managers would start getting that. Some of us employees are very well socially adjusted, but when we're at work, we want to work and get our assignments done so we can keep our jobs and earn our money to pay for those very well socially adjusted lives on the outside.

about a year ago
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Firefox Will Soon Block Third-Party Cookies

smagruder Let's be pragmatic (369 comments)

If this change reduces the overall efficacy of advertising on websites, then we'll likely see many independent websites go out of business. Facebook will love this, as it seems like their goal to rub out (yes, I mean this in the mobster sense) the web outside of them.

Maybe we need a compromise?

Have a website somehow "vouch" for the third-party cookies in use on their site by either disclosing them to their users, or letting them present an option/warning to visitors that says "To keep our site financially sustainable, we ask that visitors accept cookies from our advertisers -- to that end, we require cookies to not be blocked to access our content".

I understand why people detest advertising, but it's also part of a commercial ecosystem that keeps the independent web alive and kicking. If we allow the blocking of third-party cookies, we should also give webmasters the power to block access from anyone who is blocking them, and even more, blocking ads on their site. It's only fair.

about a year ago
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FBI Says They're Now Working 24/7 To Investigate Hackers and Network Attacks

smagruder Downshift in spambot activity (74 comments)

I've been noticing a downshift lately of spambot activity on my websites. Maybe this is why?

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Richard Dawkins About Evolution, Religion, and Science Education

smagruder Let's pretend religion is gone... then what? (1142 comments)

As an atheist, I actually dread a precipitous drop in religious activity because I fear what a lot of people would replace it with, and that there would be reduced moral order (which I like, even as an atheist -- after all, murder is just simply wrong).

Do you imagine a switch to "worse allegiances" if religious activity goes into an unexpected deep decline? Worse allegiances such as corporate or fascist power (examples)?

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Richard Dawkins About Evolution, Religion, and Science Education

smagruder Re:Why does everyone need to "box in" the universe (1142 comments)

If you mean 'cosmos' when you say 'universe', I suspect a multitude of scientists would go along with you.

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Richard Dawkins About Evolution, Religion, and Science Education

smagruder The science-illiterate canard of "randomness" (1142 comments)

How do we explain to the scientifically illiterate among us that randomness is a human perception and not a scientific reality? For example, the randomness canard surfaces when they talk about how evolution "randomly" ended up with us humans in existence today. Except that science never explains evolution in terms of randomness -- this is a made-up assertion by those who don't have enough of a scientific grounding.

In the infinity of the cosmos (not just this universe), it is scientifically reasonable to say there is only the discrete and the probabilistic. When you roll a pair of dice, you don't get a truly "random" result. You get a probabilistic one based on discrete factors that are largely imperceptible to the human brain. And it's arguable that given all the discrete factors, the result is even a discrete one! Now, when you get down into particle physics, that's where we really get more into the probabilistic, but that's probably too deep to explain to these science-illiterates.

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Richard Dawkins About Evolution, Religion, and Science Education

smagruder Re:What evidence would dis-prove evolution? (1142 comments)

Science can create experiments around a number of aspects of evolution. There's no way to do this with any aspect of creation.

Also, it's not purely random how we exist. Evolution to what we are now took place over unimaginable time spans, and via natural selection we eventually arrived to where we're at today, with some people thinking unimaginatively we were created all of a sudden (snark).

about a year and a half ago

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