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Joss Whedon Releases New Film On Demand

smallfries Re:Louis CK (137 comments)

Yeah, but anybody would react like that after watching The Road. I only paid a couple of bucks to rent it on bluray and it still put me off of watching movies for a while. If I want that kind of experience again I could sit and poke my self in one eye with a rusty fork repeatedly for two hours until little bits of brain start to fall out.

ps Not my favourite movie of all time. Definitely not top 5.

2 days ago
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Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

smallfries Re:software (169 comments)

I was going to mod you up as I once had to study COBOL for exams, a long time a go. But then I clicked on your hidden replies and my, oh my. I had to reply instead to say that you really have attracted one of the most virulent trolls that I've ever seen on slashdot. You should get some kind of flair next to your username or something.

about two weeks ago
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Start-Up Founders On Dealing With Depression

smallfries Re:Huh? (257 comments)

If you are tired from working too hard then your body can recharge. Taking a weekend completely away from work can bring you back to normal. If your levels of exhaustion get worse then it can take longer. When a complete two-week break from work cannot undo the damage and bring you back to a normal level it is a sign that your body has adapted to a new level of normal.

I'm not sure that there is a real difference between burn out and depression. They probably overlap to some extent and share symptoms. I think that depression is caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain (hence SSRIs as an effective treatment). Burn out is caused by an inability to produce any more adrenaline; living in a state of constant stress has affected the bodies ability to produce it on demand and caused some kind of adaptation to its effects.

There are tests for determining stress levels in the run-up to burn-out that measure cortisone levels in the blood. Too high above base level can indicate the presence of too much stress. After burn out the levels collapse to below a normal base-line.

about three weeks ago
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Neovim: Rebuilding Vim For the 21st Century

smallfries Re:Never understood the modes (248 comments)

Fear not, there is probably a wizard to do that for you.

about a month ago
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Neovim: Rebuilding Vim For the 21st Century

smallfries Re:Never understood the modes (248 comments)

Because most of the commands accept modifiers, e.g. 10dd to remove 10 lines of text, or }d to delete the rest of the paragraph. Because more complex commands are multiple keystrokes what you suggest would involve typing while holding down the ctrl key - it is easier to hit a key once to enter/exit the mode. For selecting text in vim you can do shift-v and then then select a text range with the cursor keys (or any other movement command).

about a month ago
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Intel Announced 8-Core CPUs And Iris Pro Graphics for Desktop Chips

smallfries Re:First hand knowledge (173 comments)

The GP's confusion is probably due to the relationship between throughput and latency. Intel's designs have one cycle of latency for basic arithmetic operations (add, sub, xor etc), but they can despatch multiple operations per cycle. The Core 2 was the last chip that I looked at in detail and from memory it could execute three basic instructions per cycle with a one cycle latency. On benchmarks this looks like 1/3 cycle per 64-bit operation. The previous chip that I looked at from Intel (which was not a Core design so I guess it was a late P4 design) could do two basic instructions with a one cycle latency so it looked like a 1/2 cycle operation. But all of these operations were 64-bit, I've never seen a 64-bit design from Intel that used 32-bit operations internally.

about a month ago
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Jewish School Removes Evolution Questions From Exams

smallfries Re:If you don't like it.... (431 comments)

So, you are saying that if disagrees with the age of consent then he should join a street gang and kill someone?

about a month and a half ago
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Jewish School Removes Evolution Questions From Exams

smallfries Re:If you don't like it.... (431 comments)

Here you go, pal. You'll find free and fair elections as a central principle.

about a month and a half ago
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How Ireland Got Apple's $9 Billion Australian Profit

smallfries Re:But why wouldn't they? (288 comments)

Also, doesn't Apple have a duty to shareholders to cough up as little in taxes as legally possible?

You should trying asking that to Tim Cook at a shareholders meeting and see what kind of response you get. Last time he was described as "visibly angry".

about a month and a half ago
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Mathematicians Are Chronically Lost and Confused

smallfries Re:Bizarre advice (114 comments)

One that is clear, however, is that most mathematicians have no fscking clue what the word "obvious" means. There are some brilliant, dead authors that I would love to punch in the face.

.

I think that they know exactly what it means, but that you are confusing it with the non-technical meaning. In maths it generally means "I have managed to work this out, and I suspect that you will be able to (eventually) without my help. If you cannot, that I presume that you are an idiot and that you do not deserve my help". Contrast the meaning with the technical use of non-obvious: "Oh fuck, we're boned".

In general you should treat obvious things with care, and only skip past the trivial.

about a month and a half ago
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Scottish Independence Campaign Battles Over BBC Weather Forecast

smallfries Re:Half right (286 comments)

It's not particularly hard to fix: spin the viewpoint around the country. For the southern forecast a view from across the channel (pretty much what it is now). For Scotland spin round to viewing from the north, Wales from the west etc. This then has the benefit that whatever region is being discussed takes up most of the screen and the rest of the UK drops away in perspective.

Whoever they outsourced to is not just less smart that they think they are. They have gone full-retard.

about 2 months ago
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The Neuroscience of Computer Programming

smallfries Re:Reading vs writing (161 comments)

I'm not sure if Science is phrenology by another name, but they certainly look similar at your level of detail:

a) Part of the task under study is definitely linguistic
and
b) No effort has been made to separate this linguistic part from the rest of the task
so
c) The study has not produced evidence because of a validity threat: namely the confounding factor that the task has been presented in a linguistic form.

I wouldn't want the terminology to get in the way of the original point: the task has been phrased in textual form, areas of the brain used in text recognition lit up, the researchers concluded that programming was the same as language skills. Their conclusion was bogus because presenting a non-programming task to the participants would have provoked the same response if it was done in written form. Obviously this would be impossible to fix in the study design.... without replicating the results on a non-textual experiment, such as a graphical language.

about 2 months ago
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Delayed Fatherhood May Be Linked To Certain Congenital and Mental Disorders

smallfries Re:In other news.. (192 comments)

But on the bright side, it is unlikely that your negative views on continuing the human race will be passed onto another generation.

about 2 months ago
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WhatsApp: 2nd Biggest Tech Acquisition of All Time

smallfries Re:2d biggest? (257 comments)

Hate to be a grammar nazi but you really can't say that, you mean "2nd biggerest". The root of the word is old british, but the cardinal extension is derived from hobbitish.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Games Are You Playing?

smallfries Re:Kerbal Space Program! (669 comments)

Yup. I didn't get much time to play it over the past year, but now that my schedule is finally calming down Civ 5 is proving to be a bit moorish. I need to beat it a few more times on Vanilla before I get the two expansions.

about 2 months ago
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Why Improbable Things Really Aren't

smallfries Seems legit (166 comments)

I found it highly improbable that an article on that topic could be boring. It explained to me in laborious detail why I was wrong.

about 2 months ago
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Star Trek Economics

smallfries Re:Wow (888 comments)

The problem would be that the equation models net population growth i.e. births - deaths. When resource limits are reached the birth rate does not drift down gracefully of its own accord. Lots of people die as the system reaches a new equilibrium. Typical methods are wars over resources, famine from lack of resources or widespread disease due to a lack of resources to treat them. As the equation is only a model (an approximation) it does not cover the difference between hitting hard resource limits softly, or sharply. There is of course no natural reason that resource starvation would not kill off the entire population, as a barren lifeless world is also an equilibrium.

about 2 months ago
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How To Hack Subway Fares Using Fare Arbitrage

smallfries Re:Ticket use rules (240 comments)

It seems quite obvious from the summary that what they propose is not arbitrage - it is fraud. It's caught by the rule that you state, but more generally they are using a single ticket to make two journeys. In the case of the two hypothetical commuters crossing the city they are both paying for 1/2 journey and then it is being made twice. That is not a price difference between two assets, it is double-spending.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Kurzweil's aura failing?

smallfries smallfries writes  |  more than 4 years ago

smallfries (601545) writes "Ray Kurzweil has a reputation as a futurist that has remained intact for the past two decades. As we catch up with the first year for which he made concrete predictions it seems that cracks are starting to appear. Kurzweil's predictions of the future have revolved around technology providing exponential returns on investment. But the latest evidence suggests that these returns may fail in the semiconductor business as economics catches up with technology.

"The usable limit for semiconductor process technology will be reached when chip process geometries shrink to be smaller than 20 nanometers (nm), to 18nm nodes," explains Len Jelinek, director and chief analyst for semiconductor manufacturing at iSuppli in a new report. "At those nodes, the industry will start getting to the point where semiconductor manufacturing tools are too expensive to depreciate with volume production, i.e., their costs will be so high, that the value of their lifetime productivity can never justify it," he adds.

Which area will maintain such a high rate of improvement as microprocessors succumb to economic reality?"

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BBC Faces uphill battle over DRM

smallfries smallfries writes  |  more than 6 years ago

smallfries (601545) writes "Yesterday the new BBC service to push non-DRM content to iPhones was opened up for use by linux and mac users. This morning the BBC announced that despite "hackers exploiting" their system the security hole had been closed. The "hack" involved a simple change of user agent string to access the iPhone content. By closing the hole again the BBC has entered an arms race with non-microsoft users determined to use higher quality content than the flash streams. The BBC seems to believe that it can identify connections from trusted iPhones, and deliver non-DRM content without linux and mac "hackers" using the system. After only a few hours the system was opened up again. How long will the BBC ignore technological reason and pretend that it can deliver non-DRM content to one group of its users, while denying another group the same service?"
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Irresistible Force Meets Immovable Object

smallfries smallfries writes  |  more than 6 years ago

smallfries (601545) writes "After a long battle with Linux users in the UK, the BBC was forced into releasing a flash version of the iPlayer streaming service to fulfil their obligations to license-fee payers. After claiming that development of linux and mac versions of the iPlayer would take two years, the beeb has rushed to support the iPhone. Unlike those untrustworthy scum who use non-microsoft operating systems, iPhone users can be trusted because their platform is locked down ... so the beeb opened a non-DRM hole in the iPlayer to support them. This was guarded by the extreme security of User Agent strings! Long story shut, linux and mac users have made their own non-DRM, non-microsoft platform from firebug and wget. UK users can now watch (and keep) their favorite BBC shows, just follow the links in the 'el Reg story."
Link to Original Source
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Net Neutrality Debate crosses the Atlantic

smallfries smallfries writes  |  more than 6 years ago

smallfries (601545) writes "The network neutrality debate has raged on in the States for some time now. Now broadband providers in the UK have banded together to threaten the BBC that plans to provide programming over "their" network could disrupt operations. The BBC is being asked to cough up the readies to pay for bandwidth charges, otherwise traffic shaping will be used to limit access to the iPlayer. Strange really, I thought that the monthly fee we pay already was to cover access ... but maybe it only covers the final mile and they need to be paid twice to cover the rest of the journey."
Link to Original Source

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