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Sony Pictures Leak Reveals Quashed Plan To Upload Phony Torrents

smallfries Re:Because it doesn't work? (130 comments)

So you mean that they would need some way to stop people from seeing the reports that the torrent is fake?

Kind of like there would be some good content (accurate comments) and they would need to hide it somehow, maybe using some bad content.

Hmmm...... perhaps this is already a solve (non-)problem. We should get the astroturfers on it right away!

2 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Making a 'Wife Friendly' Gaming PC?

smallfries Re:Don't fight it (720 comments)

If it's not a volume problem then you just ain't packing her right. If it is a volume problem then you need to compress her to improve the density.

4 days ago
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The Case For Flipping Your Monitor From Landscape to Portrait

smallfries Re:nearly back to 4:3 with 2 side by side (563 comments)

I did exactly this for two years. In the end it was just too painful, partly in the eyes and partly in the neck. I switch to a T-shape for a while, but now I'm back to 2x landscape. Of course now it is too wide so I've centered one and pushed the other to the side. Eventually I guess I'm destined to go back to a single screen.

about a week ago
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Comcast Sued For Turning Home Wi-Fi Routers Into Public Hotspots

smallfries Re:I am by no means a fan of Comcast... (291 comments)

That sounds insanely cool. I can't remember what the issue was here, I think it was working out who was responsible for the wire at fault (customer, isp, telco) as they need to organise the repair as well as pay for it.

about a week ago
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Ubuntu Gets Container-Friendly "Snappy" Core

smallfries Re:I assume (149 comments)

Nah, it's already supplied by the base system(d).

about a week ago
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Comcast Sued For Turning Home Wi-Fi Routers Into Public Hotspots

smallfries Re:I am by no means a fan of Comcast... (291 comments)

Back in the UK we had a situation quite like you describe, we used adsl a lot more than cable but in terms of contention they all worked roughly the same.

Here in Sweden I still find it a bit bizarre but we have no limits at all. Everything has been built either at, or close to, worst case levels of usage. Internet provision seems to be handled on the basis that people will use it. When we had cable I used to leave torrents maxing out the line speed for weeks on end and we never got any complaints. Back then I think our connection was 24mb and I was a relatively light user, only downloading 500-1000gb a month.

Now we are back to really shitty adsl and although there are no bandwidth limits we get have some really crappy copper so the line drops at least five times a day. Can't wait to get fiber. It's sitting un-terminated in our basement and all we need is an engineer to come out and do the final installation. Sadly I kid not when I say it might be another two years. Yay for socialism!

about a week ago
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Ubuntu Gets Container-Friendly "Snappy" Core

smallfries Re:20 years? (149 comments)

It's measured in recruitment years, so they find the longest experience in DevOps node.js in the company. It rises fast though, could have to risen to 40yrs since the article was written for such a hot dynamic company as this.

about a week ago
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Comcast Sued For Turning Home Wi-Fi Routers Into Public Hotspots

smallfries Re:I am by no means a fan of Comcast... (291 comments)

Before there were dedicated laws against hacking the main charge used was Theft of Electricity, and normally that was only a few cents worth. It will be interesting to see if a corporation has additional rights in this area that it can argue in court.

about a week ago
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Comcast Sued For Turning Home Wi-Fi Routers Into Public Hotspots

smallfries Re:I am by no means a fan of Comcast... (291 comments)

Since the 2nd modem is virtualized, it should not affect your transfer rates or bandwidth quotas.

I'm not familiar with with cable in the states, but does this mean that Comcast are selling a service well below line speed? Where I am the cable company will sell you whatever they can squeeze down the line: this week it is 1000/100, but it tends to go up every month or two as they switch cable boxes.

about a week ago
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Comcast Sued For Turning Home Wi-Fi Routers Into Public Hotspots

smallfries Re:Comcast Business Class (291 comments)

So you would let Ubisoft get away with it? Think of the gun more as a tool and use it get out of the room first...

about a week ago
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The Failed Economics of Our Software Commons

smallfries Re:I am no economist, but as a geek ... (205 comments)

Wow. Ok, now that is the kind of lifestyle that I'm looking for... as long as the four hours is coding :)

about a week ago
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The Failed Economics of Our Software Commons

smallfries Re:I am no economist, but as a geek ... (205 comments)

I'm not sure that I am rebutting a different argument. When you said that hunter/gathers generally have more leisure time I interpreted that as meaning "more than us". Which is exactly what I was disagreeing with.

I don't spend 8 hours a day performing an activity that pays for my food and shelter: my wage is 3x my basic needs. So it takes me about 2.5hrs of work to do that. I do actually have a flexible work environment where I could stop at that point, but instead I stick around for another 5hrs and take home more cash. That is not an excess as you have phrased it - I can operate in other markets than basic needs and I am procuring funds for those.

Also, I did not imply that you had claimed that hunter gatherers have it easy, although you may have been misled by my british turn of phrase. I would claim that 13-20hrs of work a week is having it easy, my question to you was whether or not that was true that hunter/gathers worked less than this? My assumption is that they would need more time than this to acquire food each week.

about a week ago
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How Relevant is C in 2014?

smallfries Re:macro assembler (640 comments)

Some good points; yup CS and vocational training are miles apart and one does not imply the other.

But about elitism: how could it not be elitist to define what makes a good programmer?

about a week ago
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How Relevant is C in 2014?

smallfries Re:macro assembler (640 comments)

Where are you drawing the line for good?

I can see that somebody could program without knowing anything at all about assembly language, but I find it difficult to believe that they would be any good at it. For many years CS curricula around the world contained the same sequence of courses: a "high" level language (be it C, C++ or Java depending on time and location), assembly language for a real architecture (SPARC, MIPS or x86) then a compiler course later in the degree that explicitly teachs the mapping from (parts of) the high level language into the low level language.

It has been understood for a long time that know both of these languages and having some explicit knowledge about what a compiler does to convert between them makes a programmer better. The vast majority of programmers my age (mid 30s) went through this sequence of courses as a mandatory part of their undergraduate education. I'm really curious what your definition of a "good programmer" is that doesn't know assembly language. How do they differ from just a programmer?

about a week ago
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The Failed Economics of Our Software Commons

smallfries Re:Summary, or tl;dr (205 comments)

Nice summary, much clearer than the original.

There seems to be a basic mismatch between the "problem" and the "solution". Most of the lead-in talks about corporate financing, and companies free-loading without paying for development. Well, in that world the funding distribution is from Extremistan (i.e it is probably a power-law distribution). So most of the money is held in pledges that unmatched by ten peers. The matching model only makes sense in Mediocrastan (i.e the roughly a uniform distribution) where the majority of the pledges would be matched.

So let's say there is a big super important project and one million individuals put up their $1 pledges. There is also a company that wants/needs the results and is willing to put up $1 million to get it done. Sadly they are limited to $1 and the other $999,999 cannot be spent.

I don't think that a ransom-ware model for open-source is a good idea at all, but the author really needs to rethink exactly which model they use. Or to phrase that in the author's own language "carefully considerating the underlying game theory and doing a bit of mechanism design leads us to much better equilibria".

about a week ago
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The Failed Economics of Our Software Commons

smallfries Re:I am no economist, but as a geek ... (205 comments)

I guess that you are talking national averages, but about 1/3 of my wage covers all my basic living costs so about 13hr/week of labour. I think the national average here would be about 1/2, or about 20hr/week. Did hunter/gatherers really have it that easy?

about a week ago
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Programmer Father Asks: What Gets Little Girls Interested In Science?

smallfries Re:Yeesh (584 comments)

I'm curious, do you type and argue as if you are twelve years old because:

a) you are in fact twelve years old with unsupervised access to the internet
b) YOU are SO mentally DEFICIENT that this IS the way THAT you THINK?

about a week ago
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Uber Banned In Delhi After Taxi Driver Accused of Rape

smallfries Re:Sadly,... (179 comments)

Yeah, because the "regulated" taxi industry *never* has these problems.

Is that the only kind of distinction that exists - the world is purely binary? Or could be that a regulated industry has fewer of these problems. Is that not better to a lesser extent?

The problem, as always, is that people like you think that "regulation"

So what is a person like me then? Is that something that you are capable of understanding based on a jokey response to a request for a sketch. Wow, your deductive power of reasoning must put the great Sherlock Holmes to shame. Either that or you over-generalise so freely that you are not even aware when you do it. You know, like an idiot.

Perhaps you should spend an hour or two reading about cognitive dissonance, and try to spot the analogy to the point that you were trying to make with Regulatory Capture. I'll warn you - your world view is about to get a dramatic overhaul.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Kurzweil's aura failing?

smallfries smallfries writes  |  more than 5 years ago

smallfries (601545) writes "Ray Kurzweil has a reputation as a futurist that has remained intact for the past two decades. As we catch up with the first year for which he made concrete predictions it seems that cracks are starting to appear. Kurzweil's predictions of the future have revolved around technology providing exponential returns on investment. But the latest evidence suggests that these returns may fail in the semiconductor business as economics catches up with technology.

"The usable limit for semiconductor process technology will be reached when chip process geometries shrink to be smaller than 20 nanometers (nm), to 18nm nodes," explains Len Jelinek, director and chief analyst for semiconductor manufacturing at iSuppli in a new report. "At those nodes, the industry will start getting to the point where semiconductor manufacturing tools are too expensive to depreciate with volume production, i.e., their costs will be so high, that the value of their lifetime productivity can never justify it," he adds.

Which area will maintain such a high rate of improvement as microprocessors succumb to economic reality?"

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BBC Faces uphill battle over DRM

smallfries smallfries writes  |  more than 6 years ago

smallfries (601545) writes "Yesterday the new BBC service to push non-DRM content to iPhones was opened up for use by linux and mac users. This morning the BBC announced that despite "hackers exploiting" their system the security hole had been closed. The "hack" involved a simple change of user agent string to access the iPhone content. By closing the hole again the BBC has entered an arms race with non-microsoft users determined to use higher quality content than the flash streams. The BBC seems to believe that it can identify connections from trusted iPhones, and deliver non-DRM content without linux and mac "hackers" using the system. After only a few hours the system was opened up again. How long will the BBC ignore technological reason and pretend that it can deliver non-DRM content to one group of its users, while denying another group the same service?"
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Irresistible Force Meets Immovable Object

smallfries smallfries writes  |  more than 6 years ago

smallfries (601545) writes "After a long battle with Linux users in the UK, the BBC was forced into releasing a flash version of the iPlayer streaming service to fulfil their obligations to license-fee payers. After claiming that development of linux and mac versions of the iPlayer would take two years, the beeb has rushed to support the iPhone. Unlike those untrustworthy scum who use non-microsoft operating systems, iPhone users can be trusted because their platform is locked down ... so the beeb opened a non-DRM hole in the iPlayer to support them. This was guarded by the extreme security of User Agent strings! Long story shut, linux and mac users have made their own non-DRM, non-microsoft platform from firebug and wget. UK users can now watch (and keep) their favorite BBC shows, just follow the links in the 'el Reg story."
Link to Original Source
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Net Neutrality Debate crosses the Atlantic

smallfries smallfries writes  |  more than 7 years ago

smallfries (601545) writes "The network neutrality debate has raged on in the States for some time now. Now broadband providers in the UK have banded together to threaten the BBC that plans to provide programming over "their" network could disrupt operations. The BBC is being asked to cough up the readies to pay for bandwidth charges, otherwise traffic shaping will be used to limit access to the iPlayer. Strange really, I thought that the monthly fee we pay already was to cover access ... but maybe it only covers the final mile and they need to be paid twice to cover the rest of the journey."
Link to Original Source

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