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Comments

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Tesla: A Carmaker Or Grid-Storage Company?

snsh Re:Panasonic (151 comments)

Not to mention, batteries for cars are are optimized for weight, while batteries for grid power are optimized for everything but weight.

about two weeks ago
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Department of Transportation Makes Rear View Cameras Mandatory

snsh dollars vs. lives vs. dollars (518 comments)

If you want to treat this as an engineering tradeoff, then you have to not only measure deaths but property damage.

Myself I've never reversed into a human being, but I have reversed the car into 1) dozens of other bumpers in tight parallel-parking spots, 2) a fence 3) several curbs 4) the side of a car, 5) a stone wall, and just two months ago 6) a trailer hitch. All those dings and dents cost money, and are much easier to assess than the actuarial dollar-value of 15 deaths.

The real scandal in this news, though, is that the NHTSA has delayed crafting this simple rule for so long. The law was passed in 2008 with a deadline of early 2011. The Obama administration delayed the rulemaking for so long presumably because most auto makers make money selling cameras as optional equipment. The NHTSA gave the excuse that they needed time to do a 'required cost-benefit analysis' of the 15/deaths per year against the $150 cost of the camera. What the heck takes so long? Congress already passed the law requiring the cameras. All NHTSA had to do is take out a piece of letterhead, write down "10 million cars/year * $150/car / 15 lives/year equals $100 million/life", sign it, and file it away.

about two weeks ago
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Used IT Equipment Can Be Worth a Fortune (Video)

snsh Re:The problem with eBay to sell electronics (79 comments)

You should care. If someone needs your widget right now, is unwilling to wait a week for your auction to end, and is willing to pay more than your reserve price, then you're losing that sale opportunity. That's where the reserve == BIN assumption fails.

about three weeks ago
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Used IT Equipment Can Be Worth a Fortune (Video)

snsh The problem with eBay to sell electronics (79 comments)

eBay could be the perfect place to sell used electronics. The problem is the way they handle auction / buy-it-now listings.

Suppose you have a used Dell-brand server. You know that almost nobody is going to spend more than $800 on it, because for that money you could buy a new model. On the other hand, you figure someone out there might spend $500 on it because they're nearby and need it ASAP. And, you're willing to let people bid on it for a week and get it rid of it at the end of the week.

You can't accomodate all three parameters at once. If you set a reserve price, then once auctioning hits that reserve, then the buy-it-now is killed. On the other hand, if final bids are less than reserve, then the auction is effectively cancelled, and you're stuck holding the item.

Until eBay changes this, it will remain a non-ideal place to sell old IT equipment.

about three weeks ago
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The $100,000 Device That Could Have Solved Missing Plane Mystery

snsh Re:Does it really cost $100k? (461 comments)

Most people are never involved in an airplane crash. Making air travel more expensive makes travel a tiny bit less safe, because more people will drive instead of fly.

about a month ago
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Autodesk Says It's Killing Softimage Development, Support

snsh Re:Longtime Softimage Users Are Stunned By The New (85 comments)

Autodesk has done this before. GeneriCAD, Drafix, were just a few competitors which Autodesk acquired and shutdown. Their practices are very anticompetitive.

about a month ago
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Physics Forum At Fermilab Bans Powerpoint

snsh Re:Delivery Tool (181 comments)

Powerpoint has been best described as a "projector operating system".

about a month ago
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Bitcoin Exchange Flexcoin Wiped Out By Theft

snsh Re:Unregulated currency (704 comments)

"Unregulated and not watched by the government"

You mean like silver and gold?

about a month and a half ago
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Does Relying On an IDE Make You a Bad Programmer?

snsh Re:No (627 comments)

I thought it's Sussudio.

about 2 months ago
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Layoffs At Now-Private Dell May Hit Over 15,000 Staffers

snsh Only 12% of workforce (287 comments)

A tech company laying off around 10% of its workforce isn't drastically shrinking. They're just doing routine housekeeping.

about 2 months ago
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Price of Amazon Prime May Jump To $119 a Year

snsh Re:how many products? (298 comments)

The biggest shame of Prime is that it defaults to free, 2-day shipping for every purchase, including large objects like major appliances that you don't need in 2-days. One heavy item can easily cost Amazon more for expedited shipping than what they charge for the Prime membership fee. It's a huge waste.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Events Calendar Software For Local Community?

snsh Trumba (120 comments)

Consider Trumba. It's not a free service, and it will cost you around $100/month, but they give you a lot for your money. We've been using them for our local public-facing calendar (~500 events a month) for several years.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do With Misdirected Email?

snsh Re: Get a real mail account (388 comments)

Except there is no "correctly spelled domain". You're saying that the owner of "ashley.com" can stake a claim to owning "ashlee.com" or "ashleigh.com". You also presume (incorrectly) that the multinational registered their domain first. Pay attention to context. This thread is about personal names as part of domain names where there's a lot of variation, not about fanciful marks which enjoy stronger trademark protection.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do With Misdirected Email?

snsh Re: Get a real mail account (388 comments)

Nope. For a UDRP to go anywhere, you need to meet a pretty high bar, as in you actually registered a domain with the intent to confuse the public, and have no legitimate claim to it otherwise. And since when does ICANN award damages?

But more to the point, you're basically saying that the recipient of a misdirected email (like the OP) is required to delete it. That's not the law.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do With Misdirected Email?

snsh Re: Get a real mail account (388 comments)

My personal domain name is a variation in the spelling of the name of a multinational company. I get a lot of people's bank statements, hotel reservations, etc. which I suppose come from senders who key in email addresses read to them over the phone, and are prone to typing in the wrong spelling.

The volume of the email has gone way down over time since self-service has become more common. It's not as big a problem as it used to be.

The best part of it, though, is when I get CV/resumes from random job applicants trying to email the company. There's unlimited prank potential when you're dealing with someone who thinks you might offer them a real job.

about 3 months ago
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Postal Service Starting To Use Mobile Point of Sale Tech

snsh The USPS is still way behind (75 comments)

It amazes me how little the USPS "clicknship" website has changed over the past 10+ years. A consumer still cannot go online and print out a stamped, first class envelope, let alone an unstamped mailing label. You still cannot fill out paperwork for certified or registered mail online, instead you have to go to the post office and scribble on one of those adhesive-backed green labels with smudgy ink. If you don't want to verify a mailing address or ZIP+4, it's far easier to type it into Google.com than USPS.com because you can't do an unstructured search for an address without tabbing between Address1, Address2, City, etc. Unless you're sending an Express Mail overnight package, there isn't much you can do from USPS.com.

The USPS need a leader who can really embrace technology, deploy more online self-service tools, and more functional self-service kiosks. Maybe they should just buy out stamps.com for a billion dollars and offer it as a free service to everyone.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Effective, Reasonably Priced Conferencing Speech-to-Text?

snsh Re:captions (81 comments)

Youtube is far from the best speech-to-text technology available. The best STT technology is probably owned by the NSA or companies that work with them. Part of the secret sauce to good STT is voice training and speaker recognition, which I don't believe youtube's STT is capable of yet. As far as Youtube is concerned, it's only one person talking throughout each video, so when you have a French dude speaking one sentence, followed by an Irish woman the next sentence, youtube may not dynamically adapt to that.

But besides that, the first thing any STT vendors ask when you start talking to them is about the quality of the recorded sound. If your speakers are not in a low-noise environment with good microphone setups, the results will always be disappointing.

about 4 months ago
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For First Three Years, Consumer Hard Drives As Reliable As Enterprise Drives

snsh Re:Common knowledge (270 comments)

Virtualization is perhaps the biggest driver in failure rates of enterprise drives. When you have several VM's competing for access on the same spindle, you're bound to have a lot more drive wear than an HDD in an laptop running not much more than a web browser.

about 4 months ago
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How Much Is Oracle To Blame For Healthcare IT Woes?

snsh Oracle IDM sucks (275 comments)

Organizations seem to get the idea of using Oracle identity management when they're already using Peoplesoft HR. The executives on the administrative/HR side see Peoplesoft/HR as the hammer you should use to do everything, and they often have more clout than the executives on the technology side who see would rather deploy anything else. Nevermind the users who have to put up with frequent login time-outs, account lockouts, and frequent browser restarts. What the users are supposed to be doing, their work is not as important as the goal of "doing everything in one system" which is Oracle/Peoplesoft because that's where employment records are kept.

about 4 months ago

Submissions

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TSA stops Chewbacca at aiport over light saber

snsh snsh writes  |  about 10 months ago

snsh (968808) writes "Transportation Security Administration agents in Denver briefly stopped “Star Wars” franchise actor Peter Mayhew recently as he was boarding a flight with a cane shaped like one of science-fiction’s most iconic weapons."
Link to Original Source
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Police reinstated after failed drug test, arguing mixup with powdered donuts

snsh snsh writes  |  about a year ago

snsh (968808) writes "The Boston Herald reports that a Massachusetts state board has reversed the firing of six police officers whose hair tested positive in routine drug tests. The officers successfully argued that they were inadvertently exposed to cocaine from brushing what was assumed to be "confectionery powder from doughnuts" from the seat of a car, from eating a cookie kept in a pants pocket where confiscated drugs were also put, from living next door to crack smokers, and from Lidocaine administered during surgery, among other things."
Link to Original Source
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Gov official complains to too high quality work

snsh snsh writes  |  more than 3 years ago

snsh (968808) writes "When a computer scientist in North Carolina petitioned the state for a new traffic signal in his neighborhood, a transportation official replied with a complaint about what "appears to be engineering-level work" done by someone who is not licensed as a professional engineer."
Link to Original Source
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Amazon prevails in state sales tax dispute

snsh snsh writes  |  more than 3 years ago

snsh (968808) writes "A US judge has ruled for Amazon.com against North Carolina's request to turn over the names of its customers to state tax officials. The ruling was focused on privacy grounds, so the state can still re-request less detailed sales data which does not identify items purchased."
Link to Original Source

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