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Google Nexus One Hands-On, Video, and Impressions

someone300 Re:Only one question... (262 comments)

What the hell? Is this post sarcastic?

Android: Connect to the internet, sync your contacts with gmail, open gmail with your PC, select "contacts", download the contacts as a CSV file on your PC, edit it via openoffice.org, reupload the edited CSV file to gmail, sync your phone again, disconnect it from the internet.

Or just edit the contact directly on the phone, much like with any other phone. It will auto-sync back to gmail. I tend to edit my contacts on the gmail interface because I prefer having a full sized keyboard, but if I'm out, I've never had any problem with conctact maintenance directly on the phone. I don't know what you're talking about with CSVs and openoffice... I don't even have an office suite installed.

Open your desk's drawer, take out the usb cable, connect your phone to the PC, select "mass storage mode", turn to the PC, search the phone filesystem for the photos (they're intuitively located in a "100MEDIA" subfolder in a "DCIM" folder, and called "IMAG%04d.jpg" - you'll have to figure out what files contain the photos you need), copy them to the PC, safely remove the usb device from the PC, put the usb cable back in the drawer.

I've never had to plug my phone in for anything other than development or charging. Sending images over bluetooth works just fine, but I tend to upload them to picasa or email them straight from the phone, either via the wifi or 3G.

Open "music" by selecting it from the applications menu. A fancy but unuseful cover flow display appears. Press the "three horizontal lines" glyph. Another menu appears. Press the "person with a microphone" glyph. The menu changes. Find YourFavouriteArtist by scrolling the whole list or pressing the "search" button and then tapping "Y", and select him. Press the "musical note glyph", then select the first track.

I use spotify so I can't comment.

more than 4 years ago
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Low-Power Home Linux Server?

someone300 Zotac Ionitx (697 comments)

http://www.anandtech.com/video/showdoc.aspx?i=3562&p=12

According to this article, it's between 25-30W, and it fits into any standard Mini-ITX case. Couple it with a low power hard disk or CF drive and it'll be very power efficient. It's also possible to run it completely passively cooled, and if you wanted to use it as a media frontend, it'd be more than capable. You can even get a version that comes with it's own external power brick rather than a PSU.

more than 4 years ago
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With a Computer Science Degree, an Old Man At 35?

someone300 Re:Yes, go for it. (918 comments)

I'm not 100% sure since a lot of people here use "is" for that type of sentence. Maybe it's a regional dialect thing. Certainly in this case, I would personally have used "are", had I not initially written SPAG and then expanded it to something sensible without checking the context ;). When I first wrote the post, I had made the point that I was referring more to when I'm paying attention, rather than an informal context like /. where I pretty much just dump brain to keyboard... should have left that in.

In school, the term "Spelling and Grammar" was always used, never "Spelling" or "Grammar" on their own. Most people seem to have developed this idea that it is a concept of it's own, rather than two concepts mashed together with an 'and' in the middle. In an exam of about 90-120 marks, only 4 marks were allocated to SPAG, so they didn't bother teaching it. Simply wasn't worth it to get a good grade. The closest student to me in the sp/g test I mentioned only scored something like 65%.

Note: I dislike the education system here.

more than 5 years ago
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With a Computer Science Degree, an Old Man At 35?

someone300 Re:Yes, go for it. (918 comments)

Generally, my spelling and grammar is good. I scored 100% in a comprehensive sp/grammar test in my last year of school, but there's a good chance I'll cock up something in the following post, just to make me look like a dick :). I can do all of the tasks you mentioned in the third paragraph pretty quickly, except I get a bit slow after 10x10. We didn't learn 11x, 12x tables, and we only learnt how to use metric units. Honestly though, living in the UK, imperial doesn't come up much. Though I did a huge amount of high-ish level maths in school. I think at one point, it was 20hr/week in maths lessons.

Obviously I can't go into the rest of your post here, other than mentioning that finding the differences between event-driven and object oriented programming is a little strange thing to ask. Event-driven isn't really in the same category, so it's entirely different, but can be a characteristic of both OO and non-OO code. My use of social networks is limited to Facebook with my other work colleagues (all older) and there are no pictures of me on it besides a standard passport portrait of my face. Oh, and I don't drink. I now work as a programmer for a great company and I don't have a degree. I finished school last year, because I am only 19.

more than 5 years ago
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Watch the Obama Inauguration With Moonlight

someone300 Re:Or not (197 comments)

I love Linux and run it on many computers at home, and have never been particularly fond of Microsoft, but you really have to give this to them. It's more open than what Adobe have to offer and they're being far more cooperative than Adobe generally were. Remember, mono/moonlight are *open source*.. not even just a binary blob provided by Microsoft.

They've repeatedly helped the Mono developers and have truly made an effort to set a new precedent with many of their .NET technologies. In general, they're far more open (in specification and implementation) than their previous development efforts. Their new file formats aren't perfect, but they're certainly better than what came before.

I suppose that this, codeplex and their other efforts could be all a big plot to win mindshare from OSS developers and users and convert them to MS, then they'll break compatibility again, but really if they think that will succeed, they're living in a fairy tale world. Honestly, I do think this is an attempt to be a bit more cooperative, even for business reasons. The best thing we can do as Linux users is support actions that facilitate open platform and do our best to stifle technologies that are clearly an attempt to do the opposite. For example, if you work in a MS shop, try to get them to use their more open products over their closed ones.

What I think this is truly indicating is that OSS (and Apple) are hurting Microsoft's profit, and they're doing their best to hold their position in a more cross-platform market.

more than 5 years ago
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Slackware 12.2 Released

someone300 Re:Queue the n00bs (351 comments)

Fair enough. If you want to use Linux without the package manager, that's entirely up to you. I was just saying it's a big difference between Windows and Linux (usually).

For me, dpkg/apt is a great package manager. I almost never get any dependency resolution problems that can't be solved by apt-get update. For packages that don't exist in the repository, they usually exist in a 3rd party repos, or are easy to make yourself with checkinstall or any number of other tools.

Also, as far as many Linux packages only using a dependency once, that is rarely true. Try ldd-ing any of your binaries and comparing what's common between them. Another reason is that I can apt-get the library dev version, develop against it, all without having to depend on a potentially large UI frontend for it. Bear in mind, Linux is made to be very developer friendly.

You'll also find that the average download produced by apt-get for a program will be smaller than the application on Windows. I've used Linux on dial-up before... And if you have any access to broadband, you can generate download lists for when you get access to it.

Also, as a developer, it's best practice to keep the dependencies for your projects in your source control repository, just in-case they disappear for whatever reason. If it disappears, release the source on your page since it's GPL.

more than 5 years ago
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Slackware 12.2 Released

someone300 Re:Queue the n00bs (351 comments)

"Slackware sucks, it has no package manager."
[...]
There are still some of us left that don't think the primary goal of every linux distro is to become a clone of the Windows desktop.

I always felt that a decent package manager was one of the things that really seperated Linux from Windows. :)

I agree with the rest though.

more than 5 years ago
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DNS Inventor Tackles Flaw

someone300 Re:Law is only way (101 comments)

I don't need it to survive as such, but internet access is pretty much a job requirement when working in my field, so I need it to buy food. :D.

more than 5 years ago

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