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NASA extends ISS missions to 2024, but is the science worth it?

spineas Re:So they should be working 24/7? (4 comments)

I did do the math. They have 1008 man-hours total, of which (presumably) a third goes to sleeping, a third to generalities (such as eating, relaxation, and mandated exercise), and a third to working. As you stated, they have ~240 working hours (probably more, seeing as there isn't much in the way of entertainment up there (except for Internet access). 50 hours out of the ~240 they have for work means that still, only a little more than 20% of their WORK time is going to scientific research, the primary purpose of the station. If I tried to tell my boss that he could only get 20% efficiency out of my work situation, that situation wouldn't continue very long. I'd either receive new equipment, be switched over to another job, or, if it was a personnel problem (which, in the case of the ISS, it obviously isn't,) I'd be let go. Also, please refrain from name-calling. We're all people, we all have feelings.

about 10 months ago
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NASA extends ISS missions to 2024, but is the science worth it?

spineas Re:Keeping a multinational spacestation in orbit (4 comments)

Agreed. The main problem seems to be, though, that very little of the resource is being used for scientific endeavors. Only 5% of their time is used on scientific research and exploration, and at some point, a cost-benefit analysis will need to be done to see if we are doing work that is worthy of the huge costs.

about 10 months ago

Submissions

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Hobbyists will try to revive old NASA probe for new crowdfunded mission

spineas spineas writes  |  about 7 months ago

spineas (3440075) writes "A space probe unused by NASA in the last 17 years will be given a new breath of life and a new mission, if a group of 'garage engineers' have their way.

The Orlando Sentinel reports that the group has coordinated with NASA to revive a nearly 40-year-old probe. NASA is providing documents and schematics of the probe to assist the enthusiasts, but the engineers have turned to crowdfunding sites for the money needed to facilitate the project."

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College professor develops new invisibility cloak technology

spineas spineas writes  |  about 8 months ago

spineas (3440075) writes "A professor at the University of Central Florida has perfected a new method for fabricating light-bending materials, widely thought to be secret to unlocking invisibility technologies.

The Orlando Sentinel reports that the new material has wide-ranging defense capabilities, such as enabling soldiers, vehicles, and even aircraft to remain invisible from visual detection."

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Florida newspaper says stop depending on Russia for human spaceflight

spineas spineas writes  |  about 8 months ago

spineas (3440075) writes "The Orlando Sentinel published an editorial today saying that even though NASA and Roscosmos (the Russian Federal Space Agency) are still friendly for now even with the tensions between the two countries building over the future of Ukraine, it's foolish for the US to give $70 million per astronaut to the Russians to use their Soyuz vehicles to reach the ISS, since the United States paid half of the $100 billion price for the station."
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Astronomers catch meteorite striking moon on video

spineas spineas writes  |  about 9 months ago

spineas (3440075) writes "A 4.5-foot-wide meteorite struck the moon in September 2013, and astronomers were lucky enough to catch the impact flash on video, now confirmed as the brightest ever witnessed from Earth.
The Orlando Sentinel reports that the meteorite likely weighed nearly 900 pounds, and exploded on impact with the moon with the force of 15 tons of TNT."

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Elderly nun sentenced in Tennessee nuclear plant break-in

spineas spineas writes  |  about 9 months ago

spineas (3440075) writes "Anti-nuclear activist and elderly nun, 84-year-old Sister Megan Rice has been sentenced to 35 months in prison for breaking into a Tennessee facility which stores weapons-grade enriched uranium.
The Orlando Sentinel reports that at her sentencing, the Sister asked that her age not affect her sentence, stating "to remain in prison for the rest of my life would be the greatest honor.""

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Up-front seats for tonight's near-Earth Asteroid

spineas spineas writes  |  about 9 months ago

spineas (3440075) writes "In case you're not in a prime viewing position for tonight's fly-by of Asteroid 2000 EM26, never fear, for the event will be webcast live for all around the world to see.
The Orlando Sentinel reports that the Slooh Space Camera will be broadcasting the 3-football-field-long asteroid as it zips by us at nearly 27,000 miles per hour. Astronomer Bob Berman will be answering questions during the broadcast, submitted via Twitter with the hashtag #Asteroid."

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NASA extends ISS missions to 2024, but is the science worth it?

spineas spineas writes  |  about 10 months ago

spineas (3440075) writes "The Orlando Sentinel reports that even though the crew aborad the International Space Station has 1,008 man-hours per week available to them, only 50 man-hours per week is actually used on scientific research, the main purpose of the ISS. The recent decision to extend the life of the ISS to 2024 may not be the best use of funds, especially when the money can be put into future projects, such as manned missions to Mars."
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Anti-mining activists using social media to coordinate protests, attacks

spineas spineas writes  |  about a year ago

spineas (3440075) writes "The use of social media, especially on relatively low-cost mobile devices, is allowing large, sophisticated protests to form in countries in which communication can be limited by a lack of access to technology.

In an industry where civil unrest can cause billions of dollars in losses if an investment fails, the shutdown of even a single project can have massive, rippling economic effects on the nation in which the project takes place."

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Relapse of 'cured' HIV patients spurs AIDS science on

spineas spineas writes  |  about a year ago

spineas (3440075) writes "Though the two 'Boston patients' have relapsed and have had to resume antiretroviral drug treatments to keep the HIV virus at bay, researchers have a wealth of new information from the temporary remission in the two patients which can be applied towards finding a more permanent cure for the disease."
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Google buys eighth robotics company in six months

spineas spineas writes  |  about a year ago

spineas (3440075) writes "Google recently acquired Boston Dynamics, a robotics company that has had a hand in many advanced defense robotics for the U.S. military, making it the eighth such purchase for the search engine giant in the last six months.

Boston Dynamics is well known for having developed the robot named "Cheetah," capable of running at speeds of 28MPH."

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London-based company to debut $38 Android 4.0 tablet in the U.S.

spineas spineas writes  |  about a year ago

spineas (3440075) writes "A tablet that retails for US $38 in India will soon be made available for purchase in the United States. Originally designed to bring the knowledge on the Internet to children in low-income communities, the widespread availability of low-cost, connected tablets can open up a new world for children, the disabled, and even those who just want to use it in their already-connected homes."
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Former "space pioneer" now homeless, charged with arson

spineas spineas writes  |  about a year ago

spineas (3440075) writes "Draven Premate, a former NASA contractor who designed experimental furnaces to be tested during space shuttle missions, was arrested Saturday after setting fire to a church in downtown Orlando because he was "tired of the mosquitoes.""
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JetBlue launches satellite-based inflight Wi-Fi

spineas spineas writes  |  about a year ago

spineas (3440075) writes "JetBlue is rolling out a new form of inflight Wi-Fi operating from satellites instead of ground-based cell towers. Up to eight times faster than traditional inflight Wi-Fi, it will enable users to stream video whilst in the air, something that is nearly impossible to do with current dial-up speed access in aircraft."
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