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Comments

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People Who Claim To Worry About Climate Change Don't Cut Energy Use

squizzar Re: user error (710 comments)

They do have smaller gallons though: 31 US MPG is actually 37 UK MPG, which is not too bad for a 525 - beats my 99 2.8 A4 which does 30 most of the time (but then I use it very rarely, so I accept the cost of fuel as the trade off for having a very nice car for very little money as most people don't want something that thirsty).

The 320d is a wonderful machine - my partners 05 one does around 47 with some relatively leaden-footed motorway driving - could get it to 50+ with some caution.

about a month ago
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Harvard Study Links Neonicotinoid Pesticide To Colony Collapse Disorder

squizzar Re:Who would have guessed? (217 comments)

There's an awful lot of stuff you could make from plants that isn't exactly 'friendly' if used in high enough quantity or concentration. Reduction ad absurdum: Crude oil is simply the remains of zooplankton and algae after heat and pressure has been applied for some time... would you spray a field with it? Just because it's from a 'natural' source doesn't mean it's harmless.

about 3 months ago
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Did the Ignition Key Just Die?

squizzar Re:If not... (865 comments)

In a modern car with fuel injection and electronic ignition? The kill switch can kill a number of components quite easily to stop the engine. Just using !kill as an enable to the signals that tell the injectors to open would be enough. For redundancy you could also make sure that the low-voltage side of the ignition coils is masked with it. For complete safety you can block the fuel pumps as well.

about 4 months ago
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SEC Chair On HFT: 'The Markets Are Not Rigged'

squizzar Re:Not a surprise (303 comments)

The guy in the book showed you can mitigate the effect by measuring the delays and making sure your order hits all the exchanges it's going to at the same time. Cost is a few reels of fibre (or maybe, if you were being fancy, some kind of controllable TCP delay insertion hardware). These fund managers make quite a bit of cash: I'd hope they'd try to understand the game they're playing, instead of hoping that things work the way they've assumed they do and complaining when they're wrong.

about 4 months ago
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SEC Chair On HFT: 'The Markets Are Not Rigged'

squizzar Re:Not a surprise (303 comments)

Just to add: If the markets were as corrupt as that, who'd put their money in them?

about 4 months ago
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SEC Chair On HFT: 'The Markets Are Not Rigged'

squizzar Re:Not a surprise (303 comments)

You have multiple separate exchanges. It's not about routing, it's about delays to _separate_ venues. By watching what happens on one you make plays on the other. An article I read somewhere (I can't remember where, so please forgive woolly statement) had the HFT traders making a profit on just over 50% of the trades, they just make a _lot_ of trades is all.

about 4 months ago
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Oklahoma Botched an Execution With Untested Lethal Injection Drugs

squizzar Re:What's the problem? (1198 comments)

Hypothetical: A person is is of the opinion that someone must die. Perhaps this someone has committed an act so heinous that the person in question feels they should no longer be allowed to live. Why should that person not kill them? Is killing someone so abhorrent worse than allowing them to live?

about 4 months ago
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SEC Chair On HFT: 'The Markets Are Not Rigged'

squizzar Re:Fucking Casuals. (303 comments)

But they're those long term investors everyone wants in the market right? They're expecting to make more than those few pennies on the stocks aren't they?

This fantasy long term investor looks at things they could invest in, determines the potential return and risk of losses and picks stocks to invest in. So when placing the orders to buy these investments they set a price at which they thing it's worth buying - e.g. where their calculated risk/return ratio favours that investment over something else. If someone winds the price up, exceeding the limit, then don't buy it, buy the other thing.

If you're not going to adapt to the market that you're in - e.g. make use of the information provided - like the fact that there are HFT players out there - you're pretty much asking to lose money.

about 4 months ago
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SEC Chair On HFT: 'The Markets Are Not Rigged'

squizzar Re:Not a surprise (303 comments)

Nope. The 'scam' in the flash boys (from the interviews - as per usual Slashdot expectations I haven't read the book) is that someone places a very large stock order for X at the current ask price that is routed to multiple markets. Let's call them A, B and C. From your trader the delays to those markets are 10ms, 100ms and 200ms respectively (which are ridiculously high numbers for this game). Your HFT trader has collocated servers at markets A,B,C, and minimal-latency links between their servers. So when the order arrives on market A and fills, they think 'Hmm, someone is looking for a shedload of X. They then place instructions to buy on the other markets, followed by orders to sell at a slightly increased price. They have 90ms (- the time for exchange A to match, fill, post market data etc., and the time for orders to be placed on other exchanges). It's like some slow moving person walking from stall to stall in a (physical) market buying all the oranges, and announcing loudly that they are doing so. Is it illegal to run to the next stalls, buying all the oranges and then offering them back to the slow moving guy?

All the information is public. The market data feeds are available to anyone. You pay for more up to date market data (which includes details of fills, not orders placed) - you don't pay for the 20-minute delayed stuff on google/yahoo, but you do if you want it faster. You pay for collocation. You pay for those low-latency connections. You used to pay for a trading desk on the stock exchange floor, guys in coloured blazers who could calculate and make decisions faster. The system has never been 'fair', but HFT doesn't necessarily make it worse.

about 4 months ago
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SEC Chair On HFT: 'The Markets Are Not Rigged'

squizzar Re:Not a surprise (303 comments)

And your 401k is managed by people so naive as to allow that? They don't themselves adopt similar technologies and strategies to mitigate that? I'd move my investments if I were you.

about 4 months ago
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CES: Laser Headlights Edge Closer To Real-World Highways

squizzar Re: Movie (295 comments)

I thought all HID systems (at least in the EU) were required to be self levelling...

about 8 months ago
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Is the Porsche Carrera GT Too Dangerous?

squizzar Re:When you have a bad driver ... (961 comments)

If you are a super-duper-uber driver. Otherwise it's better at keeping the wheels turning at just below the point of locking up, which is where the maximum traction is. Hence why they used to teach cadence braking. Once you've locked the wheels the coefficient of friction is lower - and therefore braking distance longer - than when the wheels are just about to lock up. The big advantage is that with ABS every driver can mash pedal and stop in very nearly the same optimal distance as the 'best' drivers, and still be able to steer as well.

about 9 months ago
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With Burning Teslas In the News Ford Recalls Almost 140,000 Escapes

squizzar Re:Happily parked? (293 comments)

Happened when I was at primary school. Something shorted out and started a fire and burnt several cars.

IIRC E36 BMW coupes caught fire occasionally because the cabling into the boot(trunk) lid would get brittle over time and split when it was flexed. In mine it manifested itself as the central locking failing because some wires shorted out. I'd imagine there's a sensor for the alarm, or supply for the central locking that's live even with the ignition off, so it's not a big leap of faith to see that a parked car could catch fire due to something shorting out.

Cars have quite a lot of 'live' when off electrical equipment - cooling fans for example - that can be on at any time, so faulty or ill designed wiring could cause problems in stationary cars.

about 9 months ago
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Sweden Is Closing Many Prisons Due to Lack of Prisoners

squizzar Re:My view (752 comments)

The conflict between your comment and your signature is making my brain hurt... is it intentional?

about 9 months ago
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California Outlaws 'Revenge Porn'

squizzar Re:How about (528 comments)

Yeah... try talking to someone who worked in a camera shop sometime. A guy I knew had some regular customers building some pretty interesting photo collections.

about a year ago
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Japan's Nuclear Refugees, Still Stuck In Limbo

squizzar Re:How about.... (78 comments)

I thought the WHO did a study that discovered the effects of mass evacuations were far more damaging than simply staying in the affected areas were - that the stress caused by panic and hysteria over doses of radiation that aren't particularly high is more damaging than the radiation could be. This is the first google result I could find but I'm sure there was a proper report from the WHO.

I also notice that the rhetoric has changed from 'all radiation is deadly evil' to 'ok it's probably not that bad... but you might eat some!!! Horrible death!!!!'. Pro-nuclear types always get moaned at for changing their story, but I notice the anti-nuclear brigade have changed their concerns as well. Is that because of the complete lack of even illness, let alone deaths, due to radiation from Fukushima, including amongst those who are cleaning up the mess? Is it because when people looked at it they realised the linear-no-threshold approach to determining the risk of radiation is pretty weak scientifically (disproven in some studies that found low levels of radiation are beneficial and even necessary)? Is it because a lot of the world is more radioactive anyway and people still live there without coming to a significantly greater level of harm? Is it because although there is a - greater than any nuclear disaster in some cases - risk of floods, volcanoes, hurricanes, typhoons, earthquakes and - not wanting to be insensitive - tsunamis people still seem to live pretty happy lives in those areas?

Perhaps because a couple of years ago the world was ending, Tokyo was going to be evacuated, the US was going to be irradiated as it all drifted across the ocean, dogs and cats would be living together etc. but actually what we have is a lot of water (a lot of which could have just been dispersed in the ocean), a huge decontamination operation (which probably could have been targeted at areas with actual significant radiation rather than just removing inches of topsoil from entire prefectures), no deaths (other than those caused by the evacuation - oh and the 10's of thousands caused by the Tsunami itself). It must be a big disappointment to the serious doomsday-scenario junkies that none of their predictions have come true so far. It is a disaster, but those happen pretty regularly. More people died from car bombs in the middle east last week than due to Fukushima. 300,000 people were evacuated - Syria has over a million registered refugees already and a death toll of 115,000. The Rwandan genocide has a death toll estimated at 500,000-1,000,000. Fukushima was a big accident, will cost a fortune to clean up, but is nowhere near the scale of disaster it's made out to be.

about a year ago
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Obamacare Could Help Fuel a Tech Start-Up Boom

squizzar Re:yep (671 comments)

Oh, and they get between 5 and 9.5 weeks holiday, lot's of employment rights and protections and tasty cheese. The last time I saw an American commenting on France's productivity and employment laws it was the head of a tyre company - I think the French pointed out that Michelin is 20 times larger and 35 times more profitable than the US company. Also if you think the French are more concerned about money than quality of life then you have no idea what they are about. At least remember to thank them for scaring the British out...

about a year ago
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Obamacare Could Help Fuel a Tech Start-Up Boom

squizzar Re:yep (671 comments)

Might be why, despite 30% of the population smoking (2005), they live 3 years longer than people in the US (20% smokers in 2006). It's not all about money...

about a year ago
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New Alternatives To Silicon May Increase Chip Speeds By Orders of Magnitude.

squizzar Re:Why FTL? (139 comments)

That's not really how it works... Propagation delay is not related to clocks (at least not in the way you seem to imply). With a stable and monotonous clock then you can easily propagate the clock to every point of the chip with a controllable delay (see comments from an actual designer of this stuff above). A simple clock tree, for example, can be implemented using a fractal like structure. Basically imagine a capital H, you have an equal length to each of the 'ends' of the lines from the centre. To each end you attach another 'H', half the size, with middle of the bar on the end of the previous larger H.

Your comments are referring more to the actual time between clocks that the chip has to perform some function. This is the propagation delay of actual logic. Again, the simple way to look at it is that each logic gate between the flops takes a fixed amount of time to respond to an input change, thus there is a limit to the number of logic gates in a chain that can sit between registers. There are other factors - e.g. setup and hold times for flops, clock skew (due to the distance between the register and an end point of the clock tree), fanout - but that's the basics of it. By adding pipeline stages you reduce the amount of logic gates that need to update between clock cycles, and thus you can run them faster. The downside is using more registers, more complexity, and in the case of processors particularly, the need to stall or flush pipelines, or predict behaviour of branches etc. so that the pipeline can be kept full.

1 year,24 days

Submissions

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Chinese woman arrested for faking fingerprints

squizzar squizzar writes  |  more than 4 years ago

squizzar (1031726) writes "A 27 year old Chinese woman was discovered to have had her fingerprints surgically swapped between hands in order to fool Japanese immigration. FTA: "It is Japan's first case of alleged biometric fraud, but police believe the practice may be widespread."

"The apparent ability of illegal migration networks to break through hi-tech controls suggests that other countries who fingerprint visitors could be equally vulnerable — not least the United States, according to BBC Asia analyst Andre Vornic."

So it seems that biometrics are not the final answer to identity fraud, I wonder if anyone will stop pushing them because of this?"

Link to Original Source
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IBM Claim patents promote open source

squizzar squizzar writes  |  more than 4 years ago

squizzar writes "I'm a bit confused by the reasoning in the Register Article here, apparently open source is "entirely based on relaxed or non-existent copyright restrictions", which is news to me. I thought that the whole mechanism by which open source code was protected and kept open was to use the strength of copyright laws.

I don't think they are being helped by IBM making statements such as: "without patent protection, the incentives to innovate in the field of software are significantly reduced. Patent protection has promoted the free sharing of source code on a patentee's terms — which has fueled the explosive growth of open source software development." As far as I understand it most open source software licenses specifically prohibit their use with code that has patented elements. Surely their argument better applies to an IP vendor, who is able to sell their code without losing control over it. Either way it seems both IBM and The Register are muddying the waters a bit here..."

Link to Original Source

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