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Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

sribe Re:Shyeah, right. (190 comments)

But go pull the post-close EOY General Journal from 1996 off of one, I dare you.

No problem. I have data from the 1980s on spinning magnetic media, and can access it any time I want, instantly.

You need it backed up on at least 4 pieces of media, of at least 3 different types, in at least 2 different cities, in at least 1 different state; bumping each of those numbers up by 1 is not unreasonable.

I'm working on a fairly small scale, on a low budget, so my numbers are 2 pieces of media, 1 in a different city & state than the production system. (So 3 copies counting production.) But all on spinning media--different brands, models, even different generations of disks, different enclosures, different RAID systems--but still all on disk.

about half an hour ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

sribe Re:Aerial or underground ? (292 comments)

Underground people run copper or similar due to the current carrying limitations.

Nope. Copper is rare underground as well.

You would need to go up to 120mm^2 with underground aluminium to get an equivalent current capacity of 35mm^2 overhead copper which is an astronomical cost *increase*.

Nope. First off, nobody runs copper overhead. So you need to either compare overhead to overhead with the 2 different materials, or overhead to underground with the same material, or maybe overhead aluminum to underground copper. But overhead copper to underground aluminum makes no sense. So, overhead aluminum to underground aluminum, still a big cost increase, just not quite as massive. Underground aluminum to underground copper, also a big cost increase, because copper is roughly 3x the price of aluminum--thus my first comment about copper being rare underground as well.

about half an hour ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

sribe Re:Aerial or underground ? (292 comments)

There is one 3-mile run in northern England that has to be in a trough of running water to stay adequately cool.

Sure, and between a power plant in New Jersey & Manhattan, there is actually a super-conducting stretch. Relatively short runs of super high-power lines has nothing at all to do with the economics of distribution to end users.

44 minutes ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

sribe Re:Aerial or underground ? (292 comments)

Bury the lines and you will remove a large number of causes for power outages.

Bury the lines and you will incur 10x the cost per foot, under the best easiest conditions, the absolute minimum, not realistic and only achieved occasionally. More common will be 100x. Difficult, rocky, mountainous area, you'll sometimes see 1000x.

47 minutes ago
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Court Shuts Down Alleged $120M Tech Support Scam

sribe Re:You know what's "really" really sad? (129 comments)

Your straw man is not a very good one. If you read TFA you would have seen that _all_ of the companies in the decisions are US companies.

Yes, but... Those are the companies which our government DID shutdown. Your post that I responded to was complaining about the government not shutting down such scams. So if you really want to get picky like this, your argument itself was a misdirection. So, show me the scammers that are operating out of the USA, and which the FTC is not taking action against.

What? Not got any examples? Because the ones still being run are in India? Yep, thought so.

yesterday
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Cops 101: NYC High School Teaches How To Behave During Stop-and-Frisk

sribe Re: Education versus racism (473 comments)

Maybe the "adreneline-pumped idiot" had twenty years of stainless, smiling, courteous service behind him...

Maybe, but not likely. First off, of course, the good cop would only do that very rarely, while the bad cop makes it his standard operating procedure. Second off, the good cop has that innate moral compass which at some point reigns in his behavior when he realizes what he's doing, while the bad cop just continues with escalation.

yesterday
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Interviews: Ask the Hampton Creek Team About the Science and Future of Food

sribe Re:Eggs = Good (140 comments)

I'm sure your average person doesn't have a problem with eggs but there is a large enough segment of people who need to stay away from cholesterol.

Not really. That voodoo has been pretty much debunked by now.

Very low sodium diets are next, BTW ;-)

yesterday
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Interviews: Ask the Hampton Creek Team About the Science and Future of Food

sribe Re:What is it? (140 comments)

We are not omnivores.

Yes, we are.

Why aren't you sucking milk from a cow's udders, or a pig's udders, or an elephant's udders?

???

You have no idea why you AREN'T vegan, that's the most pathetic thing about it all.

I bet he does, and I know I sure as hell do ;-)

yesterday
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LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

sribe WTF??? (315 comments)

How do you compare data from your model based on LinkedIn with data from several years before LinkedIn launched? Shouldn't we be comparing either (or both) data using the old methodology against itself, or LinkedIn data against itself?

yesterday
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Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

sribe Re:The Same Game (385 comments)

There was that accidental experiment a couple years ago in GA. A hard crackdown on migrant labor and a invitation for local unemployeds to work the fields - a few dozen showed up and none lasted more than a couple of days.

Because they were unwilling to work that hard for those pathetic wages. And the GA farmers couldn't pay them more, because large farms compete on the national level, so GA farmers cannot afford to pay higher wages than farmers in other states. No such experiment would prove anything unless the crackdown is on a national scale. When the claim is "Americans will not do this job" it's usually a lie by omission, where the truth is "Americans will not do this job for slave wages".

All that said, I think that farm harvests might be the sole exception, because the work is so highly seasonal, with different seasons in different states. There might actually not be enough Americans who are willing to work that hard, and migrate from state to state, living in trailers in each state for a few weeks at a time. That lifestyle might not find enough takers, even at a decent wage for the work.

yesterday
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Court Shuts Down Alleged $120M Tech Support Scam

sribe Re:You know what's "really" really sad? (129 comments)

...but instead of putting these shitbags out of business...

You seem to be assuming that they're operating from countries with competent law enforcement available to cooperate with ours, and that they stay in one place long enough to find them. Both assumptions are incorrect.

yesterday
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Data Center Study Reveals Top 5 SMART Stats That Correlate To Drive Failures

sribe Re: Uncorrected reads (142 comments)

Oh, and while at it, RAID 1 doesn't have parity information!

No, but every sector on the drive does. When a read fails from a sector on 1 drive, RAID-1 can read it from the other drive...

2 days ago
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Data Center Study Reveals Top 5 SMART Stats That Correlate To Drive Failures

sribe Re:The measurements in question: (142 comments)

I tend to think a drive has failed once it has any uncorrectable errors... I lost some data, it couldn't be read back. Drive gets returned to the manufacturer under warranty. Don't wait around for it to fail further.

Yep, I do 3-passes of full write/verify on new drives before they go into service, and any error count > 0 gets the drive returned right then.

2 days ago
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Data Center Study Reveals Top 5 SMART Stats That Correlate To Drive Failures

sribe Re:The measurements in question: (142 comments)

After months of testing, our organization has wholeheartedly adopted ZFS and have been finding that not only is it technically far superior to other storage technologies, it's significantly faster in many contexts, it's actually more stable than even EXT4 under continuous heavy read/write loads, and brings capabilities to the table that even expensive, hardware RAID controllers have a tough time matching. Best of all, since it actually runs off JBOD, the cost is somewhere between insignificant and irrelevant.

A few months ago I consolidated all my pile of home devices onto raidz2 in a fairly inexpensive eSATA box.

A few weeks ago I moved my major client's production data onto raidz2 in a horrible cheap USB box. (Better hardware was ordered. Better hardware was defective when received. When better hardware is straightened, the drives will be moved, and the little USB crap-box stuffed in a cabinet as a spare.)

I'm smaller scale than most ZFS users, but larger scale than most smallish departmental RAID-5/10 setups. Stuck in between, and finding that these days one can get ZFS up and running for less cost than any of the hardware RAID solutions at our scale--almost none of which are trustworthy enough to use.

2 days ago
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Data Center Study Reveals Top 5 SMART Stats That Correlate To Drive Failures

sribe Re:The measurements in question: (142 comments)

Yep, I learned a long time ago that when I start seeing sectors reallocated or uncorrectable errors, it's time to replace...

2 days ago
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Eizo Debuts Monitor With 1:1 Aspect Ratio

sribe Re:Reading portrait-mode paper-shaped documents, d (327 comments)

Yes, it's much nicer to read portrait-mode documents on a portrait-mode or at least square display, not on landscape. It's especially the case for PDF files in multi-column formats where you otherwise have to scroll up and down and up and down to read the things.

There's nothing inherently wrong with landscape-mode displays for reading PDFs. For instance, my 2560x1600 display is just fine ;-)

Really, what you need is 1200 high or better.

3 days ago
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Amnesty International Releases Tool To Combat Government Spyware

sribe ROTFL (94 comments)

... the only sure way to prevent governments surveillance of huge dragnets of individuals is legislation...

What, they really believe that will work???

5 days ago
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Court Shuts Down Alleged $120M Tech Support Scam

sribe You know what's really sad? (129 comments)

Given that: 1) people were actually spending money with strangers who called them on the phone, and 2) how many home Windows machines are infested with malware, this shows that you could make a hell of a lot of money by modifying the operation just slightly--have people download legitimate scanning software which would only report real problems. You trade away some of your profit margin in exchange for not going to jail. (Granted, you might still run afoul of telemarketing regulations, but that's a whole lot less serious than fraud, civil vs criminal.)

about a week ago
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UK Hotel Adds Hefty Charge For Bad Reviews Online

sribe Re: Ask the credit card for a refund (306 comments)

Assuming the cardholder isn't trying to claim a deceptive practice. Which doesn't seem sustainable.

You really think the practice is legal? I highly doubt that.

about a week ago

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