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Independent Researchers Test Rossi's Alleged Cold Fusion Device For 32 Days

stoatwblr Re:Hoax (975 comments)

Edison was first and foremost a marketer and secondly a highly predatory intellectual property thief.

Ask the Lumiere Brothers - they found he'd not only stolen their moving project equipment and patented it the USA, but he'd also stolen one of their movies and copyrighted it as his own in the USA.

Even his lightbulb R&D stole large amounts of data from Swan - which was legal in the USA, but when he tried to expand into europe, Swan's prior patents forced Edison to back down.

He may have done a lot of stuff himself but for the most part he hired an army of assistants who never received credit for their work or research.

11 hours ago
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Researchers Scrambling To Build Ebola-Fighting Robots

stoatwblr Re:Modern Monty Python (87 comments)

"But I'm not dead yet"

2 days ago
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NSA CTO Patrick Dowd Moonlighting For Private Security Firm

stoatwblr Re:Why is this not illegal? (82 comments)

In the 21st century USA, any such laws would immediately be annulled if it suits those in power.

2 days ago
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NSA CTO Patrick Dowd Moonlighting For Private Security Firm

stoatwblr Re:Resigned (82 comments)

"This should outrage you, a public official at the top of the NSA has taken on another (very high) paying private section job"

As a non-citizen, non-usa resident, it just underscores my perception that the USA is at least as corrupt a place as India, China, Russia, or Nigeria or (add another 20-30 countries in here).

The only difference over the last 20 years is that it's coming more and more into the open with virtually no punishments meted out, whilst other countries are mostly undertaking efforts to stamp corruption out because it's damaging to their economies.

2 days ago
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NSA CTO Patrick Dowd Moonlighting For Private Security Firm

stoatwblr Re: Conflict of interest is just what they do (82 comments)

"he was off shift and thought as a private person he could get away with it but was sentenced harsher because as a cop he should have known better."

That was 1978.

In 2014 he'd have been exonerated and the householder convicted of resisting arrest or some other trumped up charge (or dead, with the cop patted on the back and given a bonus).

2 days ago
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India Successfully Launches Region-Specific Navigation Satellite

stoatwblr Re:And meanwhile (84 comments)

GPS systems are proving to be far more valuable to indian civilians than the indian military. One of the greatest advances has been the use of GPS-guided farming systems and using GPS data from ground surveys to identify areas most vulnerable to flooding and move people.

Yes, India has grinding poverty, but it's doing far more than the USA ever did to lift its people out of that - meantime the USA's poverty levels keep increasing.

The interesting phenomenon which is emerging (and has emerged in every single country in the world that wealth has increased) is that the middle classes have fewer children. In a country threatened with overpopulation it seems the best way of alleviating this is to minimise poverty.

2 days ago
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India Successfully Launches Region-Specific Navigation Satellite

stoatwblr Re:GPS (84 comments)

There are a number of GPS receiver chip designs which are external to the USA (design and manufacture). The problem is that in order to be signed off as Navstar compatible and/or sold in the USA, they have to comply with Navstar's usage restrictions.

Those requirements will probably be thrown out when Gallileo goes live.

It's worth bearing in mind that the Gallileo consortium had to agree to a number of USA demands on operation, with the threat that if GPS systems weren't able to be shut down in certain areas, the USA would simply start shooting nonconforming satellites out of orbit. I suspect the same thing happens with Glonass, else the Indians could have used that in 1999 (it was functional then) and would probably happen to regional systems if it suited the USA/Russia/China (all 3 countries possess demonstrated anti-satellite missile capabilities.)

Even without explosives, there's enough jamming capability in orbit to shut down a 3rd party's navigation satellites if desired.

2 days ago
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India Successfully Launches Region-Specific Navigation Satellite

stoatwblr Re:Region-Specific (84 comments)

"Unless the satellites are in geosynchronous orbits, of course, but then you're not going to have the separations you need for a good solution."

The satellites are at geosynchronous altitude but located off the Clarke Belt. This results in a constellation of satellites which appear to move north/south or in a figure 8 above a fixed point on earth.

The japanese system is setup the same way - in that case resulting in rather good australian coverage, but other than Sri Lanka there's nothing due south of India except a few military bases in the southern Indian Ocean.

The footprint for Japan's system is well-described at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q... - and trhe indian system is more or less the same prionciple.

2 days ago
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India Successfully Launches Region-Specific Navigation Satellite

stoatwblr Re:Good job, India! (84 comments)

"Except that today, China is very much an ally of Russia (or maybe even vice versa)."

China and Russia are ancient foes. The Soviet-sino alliance was the abberation, not the norm.

At the moment there's very little love lost between China and Russia and any alliances are out of necessity. The chinese have made it clear on a number of occasions that they're not fans of Putin's form of government (the chinese govt regard him as a destabilising influence, as they're very aware that global peace makes for better trading than endless wars do)

There are only a few places one can cross the Chinese/Russia border and that's a chinese decision. If they were buddy-buddy the border would be far more porous.

Going back to India's navigation system: It's as much about flagwaving as it is about actual regional stability. This is the same reason the french maintain their own navigation systems, separate to any EU projects.

2 days ago
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Too Much Privacy: Finnish Police Want Big Euro Notes Taken Out of Circulation

stoatwblr Re: if you ban cash (314 comments)

There's a persistent rumour been circulating for 20 years that XYZ paper money contains RFID chippery, so that Big Brother can track things.

Criminals would love this to be true.

No more guessing who's rich enough to mug, simply scan passers-by and see which nondescript one is carrying the day's cash takings to the bank.

about a week ago
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Confidence Shaken In Open Source Security Idealism

stoatwblr Confidence shaken? Not really. (264 comments)

Opensource is the posterkid for bashing this week, but at least the holes are being fixed now that attention is focussed.

The recent windows-related NSA stories show what happens when bugs remain unpublished and can get widely exploited for years before being quietly fixed.

"Many eyes" may not find bugs in a hurry if they're not looking, but when they finally focus on the code, things change rapidly - and the finding of these bugs often inspires other eyes to go check for the same thing in other code (which is how the ancient X bugs were found recently.)

People repeatedly tell me that old code is safe and secure because it's old and therefore stable. My argument is that the only "safe" code is stuff which has been security audited and gets regularly security audited - and that most old stuff has never been properly checked because everyone assumes someone already did it.

about a week ago
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ISPs Violating Net Neutrality To Block Encryption

stoatwblr Re:Vodafone guilty as well (149 comments)

"Vodafone here in Europe is also blocking TLS when sending emails through their broadband services. They do so only when port 25 is used; they don't in other cases. "

Endusers (that's you and me) have no business sending mail out on port 25 directly to servers in other parts of the network. That's how spammers operate and it's why allowing endusers to get to world:25 has been deprecated for nearly 20 years.

Most ISPs simply portfilter outbound port 25 to /dev/null and transparently proxy port 80 (http)

Outbound ssl on port 993 (imap), 465/587 (smtp auth) 443(https) or 22 (ssh) is another matter and if I found a ISP filtering or MITMing these I'd scream the house down.

ISPs who MITM your port25 traffic think they're doing endusers (and the world) a favour by keeping spammers at bay. This is misguided optimism at best.

about a week ago
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Medical Records Worth More To Hackers Than Credit Cards

stoatwblr Re:Calls from Credit Cards on "Suspicious Activity (78 comments)

"As for your experience with photo ID, the employee should be in trouble, at least if it was Visa or MC. The merchant agreement prohibits requiring ID. You can ask for it, but if the customer doesn't want to provide it, you can't make it a condition of completing the transaction."

A good lawyer can (and will) trivially argue that this policy facilitates fraud and therefore invalidates any blame the merchant might be taking.

about three weeks ago
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Medical Records Worth More To Hackers Than Credit Cards

stoatwblr Re:Calls from Credit Cards on "Suspicious Activity (78 comments)

"Bottom line (and there are exceptions), merchants aren't on the hook if it's a face-to-face transaction."

As a merchant, I've experienced what happens on a disputed face-to-face transaction:

It gets reversed and charged the same as card not present fraud.

It's one of the reasons I installed a video surveillance system at the point of sale.

about three weeks ago
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Medical Records Worth More To Hackers Than Credit Cards

stoatwblr Re:Calls from Credit Cards on "Suspicious Activity (78 comments)

Depends where you are in the world.

UK banks have almost all signed into a debit card agreement which gives the same protections as credit cards.

Card fraud doesn't cost you of the bank anything. The merchants are left holding the bag (lost merchandise AND money) and often collect horrific extra fees from Visa et al on top.

about three weeks ago
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Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

stoatwblr Re:Mobile number roadblock (427 comments)

"I've read stories of Facebook putting up a "roadblock" screen where it won't let the user log in unless the user provides a phone number capable of receiving text messages and not shared with any other Facebook user. "

The few times I've run into this it also did voice verification after texts failed.

For such cases:

Setting up a burner number is pretty easy. I have one on a UK "070" range which costs the caller around $3/min for such cases (these cost $10/year, can be forwarded anywhere in the world, and are not overtly 09* numbers, so most filters allow them). Another "070" number is given to businesses which insist on a phone number.

If anyone other than those I _want_ to call me wants to do so, they can pay for the privilege. It keeps unwanted telemarketing to a minimum - and if I do get such calls it's amusing to keep them online and paying through the nose for as long as possible.

about three weeks ago
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Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

stoatwblr Re:Empty shell of a Facebook account (427 comments)

"No one asked for ID when I picked the name of someone I haven't talked to in decades."

Noone asked for ID when I chose "Pogue Mahoney" either (there are Greek and Russian equivalents. For English, why not use Terry Wrist or L. Kaydar?)

Better to use an obvious empty shell than possibly ID-theiving someone.

about three weeks ago
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Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

stoatwblr Re:It's sad (427 comments)

"I often bump into filling my phone storage. I suppose I should spring for a 32G-64G microSD since my phone is capable of that, "

Which won't help much. The /system area isn't usually big enough for custom roms and KK upwards won't use the "external" storage without a permissions patch which requires root access.

I've repartitioned my old phone - more space in system and changed the dain-bramaged partition layout away from Gingerbread's default "1Gb /data + rest in internal sd" mindlessness. Having 12Gb in /data makes a big difference from bumping up against the limit regularly and having to shuffle apps around.

The external card now gets game/map/dashcam datafiles and all seems ok.

about three weeks ago
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Astrophysicists Use Apollo Seismic Array To Hunt For Gravitational Waves

stoatwblr Re:Gratuitous LIGO Slam (25 comments)

"One wonders what remarkable scientific discoveries and conclusions will result from creative analysis of today's data, forty years hence."

None whatsoever if the data isn't curated.

One of my constant battles is to get resources to retain data from old space missions. They're flagwaving missions first and scientific expeditions second, which means there's very little interest in keeping record around for prolonged periods.

That's DESPITE pointing out that if the raw data for NOAA satellites hadn't been kept, it would have been impossible to use them to confirm the existance and development of the ozone hole, simply because the processing system discarded low data values as "equipment error" - which added 20 years to the discovery of the thing in the first place.

about three weeks ago
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Utilities Should Worry; Rooftop Solar Could Soon Cut Their Profit

stoatwblr Re: Really? (517 comments)

"Without some amazing break through in solar power efficiency and much lower prices we will not see 10% adoption by 2022."

The issue isn't so much "solar efficiency" anymore, so much as storage technology.

Forcing utilities to accept solar/wind power at fixed prices and not compensating them for the cost of having to keep backup power sources ready to roll for when those resources aren't generating full capacity is going to generate a significant backlash. Utilities are resorting to paying people NOT to connect their windpower to the grid in Europe.

At some point the subsidies are going to go away. At that point Solar/wind/tidal are going to look extremely expensive, even compared to old oil-burning plants.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Spamhaus subjected to BGP routing attack on 21st March

stoatwblr stoatwblr writes  |  about a year and a half ago

stoatwblr (2650359) writes "At the same time Spamhaus website was being DDoS attacked, AS34109 (C3rob/Cyberbunker) were propagating BGP routes for Spamhaus' namservers, according to the blog at https://greenhost.nl/2013/03/21/spam-not-spam-tracking-hijacked-spamhaus-ip/

It's surprising this hasn't been more widely reported, to say the least.

C3rob have posted a number of ranting followups to the blog."

Link to Original Source

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