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Ask Slashdot: When and How Did Europe Leapfrog the US For Internet Access?

stoatwblr Re:Government Intervention (463 comments)

The best market that money can buy from PUC regulators...

yesterday
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US Air Force Selects Boeing 747-8 To Replace Air Force One

stoatwblr Re:Not going to disappear quickly.... (290 comments)

The 747 at Dunsfold would only be airworthy if it had engines attached. It's got dummy pairs hanging off the inner pylons (B52 style) and nothing on the outers.

That particular machine will never fly again. There are hundreds of abandoned 747s parked at airfields around the world which might be able to, although I wouldn't want to ride in one (nore would I ride in serial #5, for the same reason)

yesterday
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US Air Force Selects Boeing 747-8 To Replace Air Force One

stoatwblr Re: track record (290 comments)

" They are cheap, they bully and push, bribe and dont learn, they had to be completely hacked 6 times just to decide to spend some money on their 20 year old network. "

That sounds like the essence of americana to me.

yesterday
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US Air Force Selects Boeing 747-8 To Replace Air Force One

stoatwblr Re:track record (290 comments)

Neither early 747s or early B52s are still flying. I'm not sure there are any 747-100s left at all and IIRC all currently flying B52s were built well after 1970.

US presidential flight aircraft tend to have long lives because they do so little actual flying. The old B707 AF1 was one of the oldest examples of its type when it was finally retired. (Military 707 derivatives have all had midlife extensions including new wing spars, becuase of their hours)

yesterday
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US Air Force Selects Boeing 747-8 To Replace Air Force One

stoatwblr Re:track record (290 comments)

You assume people are buying.

If there aren't enough orders to keep the lines profitable then Boeing will stop production even if they haven't covered design costs.

yesterday
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US Air Force Selects Boeing 747-8 To Replace Air Force One

stoatwblr Re:track record (290 comments)

Or (real world example) is the chevy that was designed, built in and imported from Korea, an american car?

"Buy american" policies often have govt (local and regional) purchasing the Chevy over the Toyota.

yesterday
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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

stoatwblr Re:Academic la la bullshit. (253 comments)

"In the real world, if you have five disks simultaneously fail in an array, there was a common cause."

Usually something to do with the bus, not the drives (thanks HP!). Losing a bunch of drives simultaneously like that usually results in an array which is errored but recoverable.

As for the comment below: If you use desktop drives in an array then you need to ramp up your parity and spares accordingly. Deathstars had a very simple software fault (timer rollover) which caused them to fail at 49 days uptime.

yesterday
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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

stoatwblr Re:TLDR; 2D arrays wit a ton of spares are reliabl (253 comments)

If you run raid 66 (a raid 6 array of raid 6 arrays) then you get that much more protection.

Not that raid6 is anywhere near good enough since 2Tb drives came along. There's around a 10% chance that you'll lose your remaining spare during a parity rebuild from a drive loss on a 12+2 disk array and a 1% chance that you'll lose another drive recovering from that (I've seen it happen)

This is one of the reasons for considering ZFS raidZ3. One of the other reasons is that because it uses SSD buffering and caching, drive seek activity is smoothed out and heavy head seek is one of the prime life shorteners in mechanical hard drives (I've had identical array hardware using the same batches of drives and the ones which get hit hardest for random IO are the ones where drives fail more often.)

yesterday
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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

stoatwblr Re:4 years? (253 comments)

We run our arrays as long as we can. They tend to show a bathtub curve ramping up at the end of 6 years.

yesterday
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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

stoatwblr Re:Power Costs (253 comments)

spare drives don't take any damage when cold.

It's true that enterprise drives don't like being spun up/down, but the reality in most setups is that a spare is only spun up once - it's the start/stop cycles which drives object to.

FWIW Idle enterprise drives tend to pull more like 10W than 5W

yesterday
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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

stoatwblr Re:Predictable failure. (253 comments)

"However modern drives do not always fail normal. They develop slow spots, timeouts from which they might recover."

Enterprise firmware marks the spots bad after 7 seconds and carries on. The assumption is that redundancy will cover the loss.

Consumer drives spend quite a while trying to recover data, on the basis that there's no redundancy, so it's worth a 5 minute hang to try and get the data.

yesterday
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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

stoatwblr Re:Power Costs (253 comments)

No, it's a consequence of _having_ park ramps. They're a relatively recent development.

I've seen WD drives with a few tens of hours on them and tens-of-thousands of head parks. That kind of thing is sheer stupidity and it's not much surprise the heads get damaged when they're shunted to the park ramp every couple of seconds.

yesterday
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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

stoatwblr Re:Power Costs (253 comments)

Raid is old hat. Sufficiently advanced technology doesn't require that the disks be in the same enclosures or even in the same building.

If you design around the concept that "drives fail, get over it" then the "grunt with a cart full of drives" model will work extremely well - and he doesn't need to do paperwork because the system has been setup to note serial numbers, locations and hours automatically as drives are removed and replaced.

Any installation where a drive change is a big deal is either trivially small or incompetently run.

yesterday
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Former NATO Nuclear Bunker Now an 'Airless' Unmanned Data Center

stoatwblr Re:How is maintenance performed? (147 comments)

Bunkers embedded in hills are naturally flood resistant. :) Germany isn't reknowned for its earthquakes.

yesterday
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Former NATO Nuclear Bunker Now an 'Airless' Unmanned Data Center

stoatwblr Re:How is maintenance performed? (147 comments)

"Pure nitrogen would also be harder to determine when the atmosphere in the datacenter was safe for human respiration"

Oxygen level sensors have been around for years. the ones around our LN2 storage areas go off when it goes below 19% O2

Noone in their right mind would run a reduced oxygen environment (or possibly reduced oxygen one) without these devices - the legal liabilities don't bear thinking about.

yesterday
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Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

stoatwblr Re:Just give the option to turn it off... (820 comments)

"In fact, there is something nice about a Tesla or Prius's silence at idle."

These things are "too quiet" in parking lots. The Nissan Leaf has a noisemaker at the front which activates below 15mph (it can be disabled)

The only downside is that it's a whizzing sound akin to alternator whine. I wanted it to sound like George Jetson's flying car.

5 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

stoatwblr Re:Old anti-lock can cause accidents (304 comments)

" A vehicle changed to my lane on the highway, then had to do a panic stop from 70mph to stopped."

Why weren't you looking well ahead and slowing down already for the obstacle which caused the panic stop?

Far too many drivers only look 2-3 seconds ahead. You need to be looking and planning based on what's happening AT LEAST 12 seconds ahead, preferably 18-20

There's zero excuse for distracted driving. Your first task is to drive, everything else is secondary. I've gone as far as to tell passengers to shut the fuck up because I'm dealing with a difficult section of road on more than one occasion
(non-driver passengers often have no road sense. driver passengers usually know to shut up if things are getting complicated outside)

_Everyone_ thinks they're a good driver, regardless of actual ability, but even the best drivers have bad days and far too many people tailgate, lanechange without warning/looking or pay more attention to the inside of the cabin than the outside.

The sooner automated vehicles come along the better - it will enable driving tests to become substantially tougher without substantially increasing illegal driving.

On this side of the Atlantic driving tests are already tough (most people fail their first test), but the result has been that people drive around on learner plates for _years_ or simply don't bother at all.

5 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

stoatwblr Re:Not a fan (304 comments)

"Yet the number of pedestrian fatalities has been rising"

Which is why many of the more recent regulatory changes have been aimed at making things safer for them.

EU crash testing even includes a category for pedestrian safety.

5 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

stoatwblr Re:The "what?!" is reaction time (304 comments)

As does anyone with a cold or flu - statistically they're 4 times more likely to crash than someone at the blood alcohol limit.

5 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

stoatwblr Re:I have an even better idea (304 comments)

"If I suddenly find myself stomping on a pedal that does nothing because it has no mechanical linkage to the master cylinder, then that's a non-starter."

Are you doing to argue against hydraulic systems because that can happen too?

(I've been there and done that. As long as the way is clear there are safe ways of stopping the car, but people tend to panic.)

5 days ago

Submissions

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Spamhaus subjected to BGP routing attack on 21st March

stoatwblr stoatwblr writes  |  about 2 years ago

stoatwblr (2650359) writes "At the same time Spamhaus website was being DDoS attacked, AS34109 (C3rob/Cyberbunker) were propagating BGP routes for Spamhaus' namservers, according to the blog at https://greenhost.nl/2013/03/21/spam-not-spam-tracking-hijacked-spamhaus-ip/

It's surprising this hasn't been more widely reported, to say the least.

C3rob have posted a number of ranting followups to the blog."

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