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Imminent Server Seizure Tests Brazil's New Internet Bill of Rights

sunbird Re:The station is called Radio Muda (52 comments)

I blame sleep deprivation and not speaking PT. Sorry!

about 7 months ago
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Imminent Server Seizure Tests Brazil's New Internet Bill of Rights

sunbird HDD were seized this afternoon (52 comments)

As a result, Saravá's site is down. Here's a mirror of the original statement from Saravá. Also, here's an amusing picture of the group putting new drives in to try to get the site back up.

about 7 months ago
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Filmmakers Reviving Sci-fi By Going Old School

sunbird Re:C? (422 comments)

There is also the film's website. Which, of course, appears to be /.'d.

more than 2 years ago
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Warrantless Wiretapping Cases At the 9th Circuit

sunbird Re:Audio of argument available (126 comments)

Erm.... the audio recording ... is available. Doh!

more than 3 years ago
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Pakistan Bans Encryption

sunbird Re:no more shopping in pakistan for me (351 comments)

Not so fast. Recall that India has implemented a similar regulation. Remember the whole dispute with RIM a while back? From the linked article:

the ISP license also bans internet providers from deploying 'bulk encryption' and further restricts the level of encryption for individuals, groups or organisations to a key length of only 40 bits in symmetric key algorithms or equivalents. Such weak encryption is easily broken, highly insecure and not suitable for e-commerce or any other sensitive applications. For the use of encryption equipment stronger than 40 bits, individuals, groups or organisations are required to obtain prior written permission and to deposit the decryption key, split into two parts, with the Department of Telecommunications.

more than 3 years ago
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Pakistan Bans Encryption

sunbird Re:Pakistan is NOT benning encryption (351 comments)

IANANE, but the regulation does not appear to be as limited as you suggest. Part II, Section 4, Clause 5 states:

All landing station and infrastructure licensee(s) shall establish a Monitoring System with its interface to the Authority . . . for the purpose of monitoring of telecommunications traffic (voice and data) within one hundred and twenty (120) days . . . .

And later on in clause (6) it requires each system to have "the following features:"

Capability to monitor, control, measure and record traffic in real-time

The clause you are referring to (and the only reference to encryption) occurs on the next page:

The Licensee(s) and Access Provider shall ensure that signaling information is uncompressed, unencrypted, and not formatted in a manner which the installed monitoring system is unable to decipher using installed capabilities.

But the limitation of this clause to signaling information seems to conflict with the earlier statement that the monitoring system must be capable of recording voice and data traffic in real time. I suppose you could argue that turning over the encrypted stream is sufficient, but I wouldn't want to hang my hat on that.

It'll be interesting to see how this is enforced. My guess will be that if they take the position that it applies to VPNs, it will not be enforced against the foreign visitor. There are many internet cafes in Pakistan and many hotels with internet service so there would be a huge logistical problem to enforce it. Sadly, Pakistanis and long-term ex-pats who use a VPN from their home or office could be targeted, especially if they are government opponents or dissidents.

more than 3 years ago
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Egypt Shuts Off All Internet Access

sunbird Re:This is unacceptable (840 comments)

I've always considered Egypt to be on of the more progressive muslim states

Whaaaaat? Egypt is ruled by a dictator that tolerates no dissent. There has been a state of emergency there for 44 years! Let's see, where to start. In 2009, the U.S. Department of State Human Rights report had this to say:

Police, security personnel, and prison guards often tortured and abused prisoners and detainees, sometimes in cases of detentions under the Emergency Law, which authorizes incommunicado detention indefinitely, subject to a judge's ruling.

and

Police and the SSIS reportedly employed torture methods such as stripping and blindfolding victims; suspending victims by the wrists and ankles in contorted positions or from a ceiling or door frame with feet just touching the floor; beating victims with fists, whips, metal rods, or other objects; using electric shocks; dousing victims with cold water; sleep deprivation; and sexual abuse, including sodomy. There was evidence that security officials sexually assaulted some victims or threatened to rape them or their family members. Human rights groups reported that the lack of legally required written police records often effectively blocked investigations.

It just goes on and on. And, keep in mind, the U.S. DOS reports tend to be very conservative, so when this stuff ends up in a DOS report, things on the ground are much, much worse.

more than 3 years ago
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Rushkoff Proposes We Fork the Internet

sunbird Not necessarily (487 comments)

Well, how about we move away from certificate authorities. Impossible, you say? Not so.

Enter the Monkeysphere, a project that leverages the GPG web of trust to build trust paths for secure browsing (among other uses). From the site:

When you direct the browser to an https site using the Monkeysphere plugin and validation agent, if the certificate presented by the site does not pass the default browser validation (using standard, hierarchical X.509), the certificate and site URL are passed to the validation agent. The agent then checks the public keyservers for keys with UIDs matching the site url (e.g. https://zimmermann.mayfirst.org./ If there is a trust path to that key, according to your own OpenPGP trust designations, the certificate is considered valid, and a browser 'security exception' is put in place to allow connections to the site.

more than 3 years ago
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Low-Power Home Linux Server?

sunbird Re:Jetway w/ VIA (697 comments)

I have this Jetway, a slightly different model. I wanted 2 drives in a RAID array. It's designed to hold 1 3.5" and 1 2.5" drive, but I put 2x3.5" drives in (granted, one is mounted with a bit of duct tape). I also added one extra case fan. It's been running great and nice and quiet (and cheap!).

more than 5 years ago
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FBI Seizes All Servers In Dallas Data Center

sunbird Oh, right because gun license = law abiding (629 comments)

I care deeply about personal privacy for the same reason I care deeply about gun rights - chances are that I will never carry a weapon in my life, but our society as a whole is made safer and more resilient by the fact that law-abiding citizens can own and use them in self defense.

Ummm, yeah, the shooter who killed 14 in NY state "had a permit for two handguns and wore body armor, indicating he was prepared for a confrontation with police."
source.

more than 5 years ago
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Indefinite Imprisonment For Web Site Content

sunbird Slander and defamation -- definition (484 comments)

Slander and defamation, by definition, require a false statement of fact causing harm to the aggrieved party. Slander is for verbal statements, whereas libel refers to written statements. See slander - wikipedia.
And, at least in the US, slander and defamation are not crimes. Rather, they are civil remedies (a tort) enforceable not by the state through prosecution, but by the aggrieved individual bringing suit.

more than 6 years ago

Submissions

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Imminent server seizure tests Brazil's new internet bill of rights

sunbird sunbird writes  |  about 7 months ago

sunbird (96442) writes "Less than one week after passing the Marco Civil da Internet, Article 3 of which purports to protect free expression and privacy of personal data from government intrusion, a Public Prosecutor in Brazil is seeking to seize a server hosting research groups, social movements, discussion lists and other tools. The server is hosted by the Saravá Group, which has adopted a policy of not storing connection logs to protect the privacy of users. The Public Prosecutor is seeking to identify individuals involved in Rádio Mudo, a project hosted by Saravá, but as Saravá does not store logs, there is no information on the server that is responsive to the investigation. This action comes as Brazil seeks to place itself in the forefront of protecting internet privacy after it hosted the Net Mundial conference. Saravá has called for a protest action today at 1PM local time (9AM PT/12noonET) to protest against the seizure."
Link to Original Source
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Snowden joins Daniel Ellsberg on board of Freedom of the Press Foundation

sunbird sunbird writes  |  about 10 months ago

sunbird (96442) writes "Edward Snowden is joining the board of the Freedom of the Press Foundation, a nonprofit committed to defending public-interest journalism which exposes law-breaking in government. The foundation is presently raising money and awareness for a variety of open-source encryption tools. Please consider donating to my favorite: the LEAP Encryption Access Project."
Link to Original Source
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EFF challenges National Security Letter

sunbird sunbird writes  |  more than 2 years ago

sunbird writes "The Electronic Frontier Foundation filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court in San Francisco on behalf of an anonymous petitioner seeking to challenge a National Security Letter (NSL) the petitioner had received. NSLs are issued by law enforcement with neither judicial oversight nor probable cause, and have been discussed on Slashdot before. In response to the lawsuit, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a separate lawsuit against the individual who had received the NSL, requesting that the court order the receipient to comply with the NSL and asking the court to find that the "failure to comply with a lawfully issued National Security Letter interferes with the United States' vindication of its sovereign interests in law enforcement, counterintelligence, and protecting national security." Both cases are filed under seal, but heavily-redacted filings are available. The cases remain pending."
Link to Original Source
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FBI caught on camera returning seized server

sunbird sunbird writes  |  more than 2 years ago

sunbird writes "As previously covered on Slashdot, on April 18th the FBI seized a server located in a New York colocation facility shared by May First / People Link and Riseup.net. The server, which was operated by the European Counter Network ("ECN"), the oldest independent internet service provider in Europe, was seized in relation to bomb threats sent to the University of Pittsburgh using a Mixmaster anonymous remailer hosted on the server (search warrant). The FBI's action has been criticized by the EFF. Predictably, the threats continued even after the server seizure. On April 24th, the FBI quietly returned the server, without notifying either Mayfirst / People Link or riseup, and were caught on video doing it."
Link to Original Source
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FBI seizes server providing anonymous remailer

sunbird sunbird writes  |  more than 2 years ago

sunbird (96442) writes "At 16:00 ET on April 18, federal agents seized a server located in a New York colocation facility shared by May First / People Link and Riseup.net. The server was operated by the European Counter Network ("ECN"), the oldest independent internet service provider in Europe. The server was seized as a part of the investigation into bomb threats sent via the Mixmaster anonymous remailer received by the University of Pittsburgh that were previously discussed on Slashdot. As a result of the seizure, hundreds of unrelated people and organizations have been disrupted."
Link to Original Source
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Warrantless wiretaping decisions issued by Ninth C

sunbird sunbird writes  |  more than 2 years ago

sunbird writes "The Ninth Circuit yesterday issued two decisions in the Electronic Frontier Foundation's lawsuits against the National Security Agency (Jewel v. NSA) and the telecommunications companies (Hepting v. AT&T). EFF had argued in Hepting that the retroactive immunity passed by Congress was unconstitutional. The Ninth Circuit decision (.pdf) upholds the immunity and the district court's dismissal of the case. Short of an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, this effectively ends the suit against the telecoms. In much better news, the same panel issued a decision (.pdf) reversing the dismissal of the lawsuit against the N.S.A. and remanded the case back to the lower court for more proceedings. These cases have been previously discussed here ."
Link to Original Source
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Warrantless wiretapping cases at the 9th Circuit

sunbird sunbird writes  |  more than 3 years ago

sunbird (96442) writes "The Electronic Frontier Foundation argued several critical cases yesterday before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Both Hepting v. AT&T and Jewel v. National Security Agency raise important questions regarding whether the NSA's warrantless wiretapping program (pdf summary of evidence) disclosed by whistleblower Mark Klein and implemented by AT&T and other telecoms, violates the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The full text of the Klein declaration and redacted exhibits are publicly available (pdf). This issue has been previously discussed here (1 2 3 4). The Klein evidence establishes that AT&T cut into the fiber optic cables in San Francisco to route a complete copy of internet and phone traffic to the "SG3" secure room operated by the NSA. The trial court dismissed the Hepting lawsuit (pdf order) based on the 2008 Congressional grant of immunity to telecoms. Similarly, the trial court in Jewel dismissed (pdf order) the lawsuit against the government agencies and officials based on the state secrets privilege. Both cases were argued together before the same panel of judges. The audio of the oral argument will be available after 12noon PT today."
Link to Original Source
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Law enforcement guidebooks leaked

sunbird sunbird writes  |  more than 4 years ago

sunbird writes "Buried in comments to a blogger's post about his research regarding Sprint's release of GPS records to law enforcement are the law enforcement guidance manuals issued by yahoo (pdf), facebook (pdf), and myspace. (pdf) Each provides helpful hints for law enforcement regarding the specific data available (some of which may be obtained with a mere subpoena and without any judicial scrutiny), and even sample request language to use in different circumstances. According to the manual, facebook retains IP information about its users for 30 days and has an application called "Neoprint" to deliver a handy packet of information about subscribers, including profile contact information, mini-feed, friend listing (with friend's facebook ID), group listing and messages. There is little oversight of this practice in the U.S. because the Department of Justice does not report the number of pen registers issued, notwithstanding a 1999 law requiring reports, and there is no reporting requirement for court orders issued under the Stored Communications Act."
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Law enforcement guides leaked

sunbird sunbird writes  |  more than 4 years ago

sunbird writes "Buried in comments to a blogger's post about his research regarding Sprint's release of 8 million GPS records to law enforcement in one year are the law enforcement guidance manuals issued by yahoo, facebook, and myspace. Each provides helpful hints for law enforcement regarding the specific data available (with a mere subpoena and without any judicial scrutiny), and even sample request language to use in different circumstances. According to the manual, facebook retains IP information about its users for 30 days and has an application called "Neoprint" to deliver a handy packet of information about subscribers, including profile contact information, mini-feed, friend listing (with friend's facebook ID), group listing and messages. Law enforcement may also request a "photoprint:":

The Photoprint is a compilation of all photos uploaded by the user that have not been deleted, along with all photos uploaded by any user which have the requested user tagged in them.

This may explain how, as previously reported here, a Canadian insurer was able to rely on private photos from a woman's facebook page to cancel her insurance."
Link to Original Source

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Technology and resistance in Pakistan

sunbird sunbird writes  |  about 7 years ago

sunbird writes "I'm living in Pakistan right now working at the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, an NGO, and despite what you might think from media coverage in the west, there is still significant resistance to Musharraf's second coup. One author is describing the critical role played by technology and media in organizing efforts here, especially among newly-politicized students. Organizers here are using SMSs, blogs, and flash protests (1 | 2) to confound and evade the police. Some of the most current information about events here is often found on blogs (See 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6); although the Pakistani English-language press (1 | 2 | 3 | 4) has done a decent job covering the crisis too, notwithstanding draconian media restrictions that forbid publication of anything that "brings into ridicule or disrepute" the president."
Link to Original Source

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