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Comments

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South Africa Wins Science Panel's Backing To Host SKA Telescope

syousef Re:What Sa has over Au ? (117 comments)

The national broadband network is sure to be cancelled by the incoming government next election. It is an overpriced and unnecessary joke - entirely the wrong way of going about things.

more than 2 years ago
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Psychics Say Apollo 16 Astronauts Found Alien Ship

syousef Fuck this shit. Last straw. Bye slashdot (285 comments)

I've been here for about a decade and a half and I'm done. I do not come here to read about fucking psychics and lately I get real news in popular press before it hits this site. This place was always a nasty one, full of trolls well entrenched along with worthwhile posters, but the news use to be quality and you could get a decent conversation. Now I'd be better off reading the fucking enquirer. Nice knowing you slashdot, don't let the door hit your arse on the way out.

more than 2 years ago
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'Electric Earth' Could Explain Planet's Rotation

syousef Re:Iron Monoxide? (153 comments)

FeO is Ferrous Oxide not Iron Monoxide.

More support for my push to rename Hydrogen to Stupidium or Ignoranium. It is the most abundant element after all.

more than 2 years ago
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Multicellular Life Evolves In Months, In a Lab

syousef Re:Not so sure about this. (285 comments)

Apparently the group has become self aware!

Nuke from orbit. It's the only way to be sure!

more than 2 years ago
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Multicellular Life Evolves In Months, In a Lab

syousef Re:Not so sure about this. (285 comments)

This. I'd mod informative if I could.

Slashdot moderation simply hasn't evolved to the point where you can.

more than 2 years ago
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Programming Prodigy Arfa Karim Passes Away At 16

syousef Re:Reading the early comments... (536 comments)

No, this is the standard treatment for women in STEM. It's why most of us leave by the time we're 25.

Yeah men treat each other much better. If you are gender bashing, you are part of the problem!!!

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Changing Career From OLTP To OLAP Dev

syousef Re:Step backwards, and gloat (129 comments)

a data monkey is suppose to land him an architecture role.

The only way to enterprise architecture that I know of is to have Ivy league diploma, then you need about 5yr of experience as an analyst while you conspire to get the current architect promoted away while making you and people in your team (but not as good as you evidently) looking good.

Where I am competition is about as cutthroat as for most other management roles. But yes, 1 architect per 30-50 devs is sufficient, so it's quite specialized. I think job security would be the biggest issue for that kind of job...it's hard to fall back to developer because you go stale, and it's hard to find another architect role if you lose your current job.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Changing Career From OLTP To OLAP Dev

syousef Step backwards, and gloat (129 comments)

So... you're saying you've already made the switch from OLTP to OLAP and you'd like to take this opportunity to gloat about it, but you'd still like to hear from other developers what they think the prerequisites are for making such a move and what has held them back from doing all the cool stuff you're doing? Or am I missing the question?

You forgot to mention that he thinks that moving from being a code monkey to a data monkey is suppose to land him an architecture role. I would have thought his original job would see him better qualified. At best this is a step sideways but in reality it is probably a step backwards....and if he doesn't realise this it's probably just as well for all involved.

But then even slashdot's heyday ask slashdot was about clueless time wasters asking how to do their job or apply for one they weren't qualified for and had no idea about. Now that slashdot is a shadow of it's former self why would we expect the quality of these submissions to improve?

more than 2 years ago
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Do Companies Punish Workers Who Take Vacations?

syousef Re:I just got back from a job fair today (948 comments)

The economy is global.

If your your job function does not absolutely require your physical presence in a specific location, then your job is worth exactly what the cheapest person *in the entire world* will do it for.

Yeah do you realise how few jobs do not require a physical presence?

All that needs to happen is to keep existing regulations without continually eroding minimum standards.

Marinate on that, as the hip young kids say.

I'm pretty sure they'd be kicked out of the "hip young club" if they said that.

more than 2 years ago
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Do Companies Punish Workers Who Take Vacations?

syousef Re:I just got back from a job fair today (948 comments)

What we need now is three $40k jobs, not two $60k jobs. Wages aren't a problem. Employment is.

Why not ten $6k jobs. Or twenty $3k jobs?

Dragging the standard of living into the gutter is a false economy. People don't get richer. EVERYONE gets poorer.

more than 2 years ago
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Do Companies Punish Workers Who Take Vacations?

syousef Re:I just got back from a job fair today (948 comments)

No other solutions? Guaranteed working conditions are NOT necessary. We can have decent working conditions with much softer approaches than naked and clumsy dictation to employers. Make the environment worker friendly, so that businesses have to compete for workers. How? Well, for one, health care that is not tied to employment.

Well look there. Government regulation DOES come into it. Didn't you just dictate what an employer should or should not be responsible for providing.

Try again.

more than 2 years ago
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Symantec Sued For Running Fake "Scareware" Scans

syousef Re:Who still pays for antivirus? (391 comments)

So choose from those. Personally I don't run any antivirus as I don't download random executables from the internet nor surf to random porn sites or download from torrent sites. Windows is also secure now a days, and I haven't had a single malware in like 10 years.

Speaking as someone who once almost got pwnd drive by style on a well known photography blog and another on a major news site, I can honestly say you've got rocks in your head. Either you don't use your computer much at all for anything interesting (and I'm not talking about porn or warez crap!) or you have been very lucky and are living proof that often being lucky beats being smart.

The software that prevented both attacks was free in each case. Free version of Zonealarm and Microsoft Security Essentials. It was still very disconcerting that a process had been initiated on the computer and then frozen by the respective software.

more than 2 years ago
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LG To Pay Licensing Fees To Microsoft For Using Android

syousef Re:I'm honestly confused... (359 comments)

If you don't like the patent system, reform it by lobbying your government.

Thanks. I needed a laugh.

more than 2 years ago
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Google Science Fair Back For 2nd Year

syousef Re:Now that's a little patronising... (31 comments)

That there aren't that many women interested in science? He'd have to qualify that.

Certainly my experience. From my observation women just don't tend to get passionate about science. Sorry if that's politically incorrect but everything from science classes, science clubs to the workforce - even when there is a significant (often misguided reverse sexism) attempt to address the imbalance - I see few women who "get it" when it comes to being passionate about science. When they do get interested, I don't think they are at a particular advantage or disadvantage.

more than 2 years ago
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Eric Schmidt Doesn't Think Android Is Fragmented

syousef Re:Eric Schmidt, master of non-answers (431 comments)

Only on price though. Android runs terribly on low end smartphones and don't even have the full feature set of a top of the line android phone. Further, they're likely to be abandonded, perpetually running an outdated version of android until you ditch it. With the iPhone, even buying last gen you're getting most of the features of the top of the line. The WP7 Samsung Flash costs .99 on AT&T and offers the same exact user experince as a top of the line WP7 phone. So why is anyone ever choosing low end android phones? Because 1) the carriers are pushing them since they know they don't have to provide expensive upgradde support and will rope customers in for another contract since the phone will never be updated and 2) there's a lot of buzz around "Android" and people think even the low end phones will deliver the same experience, when what they get is a slow, feature-barren, "smart phone" that was abandonded by the manufacturer the second it shipped.

I have an Acer Liquid Metal, bought outright for $128 (including a sim card and $10 pre-paid credit). It was network locked but updating version of Android unlocked it. It is not the best phone in the world - sound quality is so so compared to "real" phone and I have had issues with the touch screen when the humidity is high. Also no front camera, rear camera quality not brilliant. Memory is also somewhat limited. BUT it has a large screen, storage is enough to run about 120 apps (after moving most to SD). It has accelerometer and magnetometer etc. So I do in fact get a lot of the features of a more expensive phone.

I could spend roughly 10x that on a latest gen iPhone but I would get very little extra for that money, and I'd be locked in to running what Apple says I can. No thanks.

more than 2 years ago
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Do Companies Punish Workers Who Take Vacations?

syousef Re:I just got back from a job fair today (948 comments)

Hell no! If I were making 50k a year I would feel fucking rich and be greatful to work 12 hours a day. In that environment where these poor saps would do anything to take your job to feed your kids you have to suck it up. This isn't 1999 anymore.

Congratulations, you're well on the way to becoming a citizen of the 3rd world. Someone else will be greatful to take 40k a year to work 14 hours a day. Someone else will beat them to the job as 30k to live on site and do 16hr shifts 7 days a week would be a huge step up for them. And someone else will be fine taking 20k to do that work.

This is why guaranteed working conditions are necessary. Without minimums competition doesn't drive wealth, it drives a race to the bottom. Booms are the exception, not the rule.

more than 2 years ago
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Doctor Warns of the Hidden Danger of Touchscreens

syousef Re:Why is this crap even on Slashdot? (242 comments)

I think you overestimated the scope of my complaint! I used to make maps for Doom, I collect and restore vintage computers, and I'm a few months away from a bachelor's degree in bioinformatics (in fact, a lecture is going to start in ten minutes.) I was criticizing people for playing games that are particularly cruel to the fingers and wrists because they require rapidly hitting the 'punch' and 'kick' buttons. That's all. :)

Yeah I had a quick look at your web page since your signature says you're a biologist. You clearly have a very good grasp of the tech, but your web page organization leaves something to be desired. I say this not as an insult but because I see you are intelligent and have potential. Still I gave up trying to decipher your page, pretty and cool as it was, it was also hard work, and there are other things vying for my attention.

Getting back to the point: Do you understand any better why a golfer, tennis player or cricket player might risk strain and injury to play their game? How about exploring the unknown like Marie Curie who found radium and her painful cancerous death. People are willing to take risks for fun or suffer for their hobby or art. Have you ever worked late into the night on one of your pet code projects?

I have to say (at the risk that you'll find it sexist) that it's refreshing to see a female geek that's into hardcore coding. I work in industry and there are women who code and do it well, but those who are actually interested in science and computing - those who "get it" and would spend extra time on it are rare. It's not a competence thing. It's an interest and passion thing. Anyway my point is I'm not trying to belittle or criticize you. Such passion is to be treasured and nurtured in either sex. My point is to try to open your eyes to the fact that others are passionate about other things and someone such as yourself should see that a bit of hand strain (which is all that most people will face) is something a lot of people will put up with to have some fun.

more than 2 years ago
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Victorinox Makes 1TB Swiss Army Knife

syousef Re:Why? (143 comments)

pre-flood I would have agreed with you, but the cheapest 1TB drive on newegg is $120. (interestingly the 2TB version of the same model costs only $10 more)

$130/2 = $65. You are quibbling about $15???

more than 2 years ago
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Paul Ceglia Fined $5,000 In Facebook Case

syousef Re:Wow... (46 comments)

I still think the scene from Swordfish (see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfy5dFhw3ik ) was way awesomer than anything Social Networking had to offer.

I can't see the page from work, but if it's the one I'm thinking of, you need to date more. Get over it, that's probably never happened in the history of humanity - its just immature fantasy for geeks who have trouble finding a partner.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Australians to pay for Super-Broadband by default

syousef syousef writes  |  more than 3 years ago

syousef (465911) writes "We Aussies have just learnt our shiny new female PM and our favourite Internet filtering communications minister have decided that they will "support a rollout [of the new national broadband network] where people were automatically connected to the network unless they chose to opt out of it" to "boost uptake". Costs of between $50 and $70 are quoted."
Link to Original Source
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Australian Music Industry Money Grab

syousef syousef writes  |  more than 4 years ago

syousef (465911) writes "The Sydney Morning Herald reports that the Phonographic Performance Company of Australia is planning changes to licensing fees paid by restaurants, shopping centres and other venues to play recorded music. In the case of restaurants the proposal is to move from a flat fee based on seating to one that takes into account number of meal sessions, price of a main meal, and liquor license status. "For Stuart Knox, the owner of the 55-seat Fix St James restaurant in the city, it means his annual licence fee would rise from $69 to more than $5500.""
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Australia could get 3 strikes piracy law too

syousef syousef writes  |  more than 4 years ago

syousef (465911) writes "Reported today in the Sydney Morning Herald is news that often criticised Federal Minister for Broadband Stephen Conroy is considering introducing 3 strikes legislation for Internet piracy. Not content with the lack of popularity of his censorship trials, it seems he's waiting on the outcome of a court case against Internet Service Provider iiNet who are being sued for not kicking off alleged file sharers. If iiNet don't lose and no precedent is set for kicking off file sharers, he's indicated that he will seek to do it legislatively. It appears he has not addressed the usual issues of accused Internet users being unable to defend themselves."
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Google To Cut Back 'Dark Matter' Projects, Staff

syousef syousef writes  |  more than 5 years ago

syousef (465911) writes "The Sydney Morning herald reports that Google plans to cut back on "experimental projects" that "aren't really that exciting." Mentioned projects that have already been axed recently include Lively which shuts down at the end of the year and SearchMash. There is further speculation that a lot of the other perks like the free cafeteria are going to be axed as "part of the belt-tightening". Not quite the same financial impact as doubling child care costs, but I guess despite the "do no evil" mantra, this once again shows if you're taking a job based largely on the perks "get it in writing". Staff quitting may not be such a burden to Google as "Google co-founder Sergey Brin announced plans to significantly reduce its workforce of some 10,000 contract workers.""
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An Ebay Sale is a Sale

syousef syousef writes  |  more than 6 years ago

syousef (465911) writes "An Ebay Sale is a Sale says an Australian New South Wales State Judge in a case where a man tried to reneg on the Ebay sale of a 1946 World War II Wirraway aircraft. The seller tried to reneg because he'd received an offer $100,000 greater than the Ebay sale price elsewhere. The buyer who had bid the reserve price of $150,000 at the last minute took him to court. "It follows that, in my view, a binding contract was formed between the plaintiff and the defendent and that it should be specifically enforced," Justice Rein said in his decision. All dollar figures are in AUD."
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syousef syousef writes  |  more than 7 years ago

syousef (465911) writes "I live in Australia. Over the last couple of weeks I've been informed that our household is required to take part in the Australian Bureau of Statistics Time Use Survey. For two days each member of the household must keep a diary broken up in five minute increments of what they are doing, who they are doing it for, who they are doing it with and what else they are doing at the time (eg. listening to the radio). This includes private activities like going to the toilet, making love etc. Since this falls under Census legislation refusal to keep this diary can result in fines of $100/day up to $5000. Providing misleading information is a bargain at $1000 per offence. What's more despite being told that I can participate annoymously, I find my name and plenty of other information on the front page of the survey. On calling I was told that I can scribble out my name if I want to be anonymous but must leave all the other identifying data in tact. I have no confidence in my government's ability to store this data to prevent a security breech and essentially no choice but to comply with this. Apparently many governments have started to run this kind of survey in the last 10 years or so. I see a huge potential for expanding these surveys and despite legislative safeguards, huge potential for abuse by companies who would drool over such information. Can a lowly coder do anything about this fascist "request" for information by the government?"
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syousef syousef writes  |  more than 7 years ago

syousef writes "The Sydney Morning Herald reports that Emmalina has quit YouTube after her computer was hacked and her personal information and private videos released. Since becoming popular, she's also received numerous threats of violence and had many of her videos repeatedly spoofed. While she's not the most sensible girl I've ever heard speak, the question remains does anyone posting their information on sites like YouTube and MySpace automatically make a target of themselves the moment they become popular? How much personal information should we be putting out there on the net?"

Journals

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Slashdot moderation is awful

syousef syousef writes  |  more than 4 years ago

I am sick and tired of slashdot moderation. The fiction that "it sorts itself out" or "most people do the right thing" is laughable. Yet I've seen such drivel modded +5:Insightful while the original gripe is modded -1:Flamebait. or -1:Offtopic (How one is insightful while the other is offtopic is baffling) Way to be a welcoming mature, open minded, community.

Just write one post that a group of fanboys or zealots doesn't like and watch it get modded into oblivion, usually after yo-yoing. People who waste their time on such childish vendettas as coming back days later to mod something down simply because they don't like what's being said are immature fools. People who hold a grudge and then repeatedly mod down anything by the person who's offended them with - shock horror - valid criticism, and downright pathetic. Getting your mates to mod someone down because you don't like it smacks of mass stupidity.

  -1:Flamebait does not mean "I don't agree". It means you believe the person who made the comment made it purely to be inflamatory rather than to make a genuine point. -1:Offtopic means the post is off topic, but is regularly applied to on topic posts. -1:Overrated is as close to "I do not agree" as we have but is so vague it should be banned. If someone wants to say they don't like a company or or product or practice they should be allowed to do so, even if you like it, and even if it's your favourite company. Apple, Google, Mozilla/Firefox are not immune to criticism and have all made some very questionable choices. On a mature forum you'd be able to discuss such things without being modded into oblivion.

  Slashdot moderation is badly broken and lately the place seems to have been taken over by immature and unsavoury types.

The only way I can see to fix it is to display ALL moderation (uncapped), not just a summary. Show the +12 insightful posts as well as the -4: Offtopic. When you cap it at -5 idiots come back 3 days later and mod things down.

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