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Study: Multimedia Multitasking May Be Shrinking Human Brains

taustin Re:quit interpreting statements (87 comments)

Nor does brain size particularly correlate with intelligence, or we wouldn't have the big, stupid oaf stereotype.

I do find it entirely plausible, however, the idiots have short attention spans, and flit from distraction to distraction constantly.

4 days ago
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CDC: Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million In 4 Months

taustin Re:CDC "Estimates" (275 comments)

From my experience, CDC estimates should be taken with a grain of salt, as they often seem dubious at best.

They're not the least bit dubious, or hard to understand. CDC estimates, like all their actions, are designed o get them more tax dollars to play with. They're reasonably good at it, and never ones to miss an opportunity to profit from public hysteria.

More people die in Africa every month from dysentery than have died from ebola ever. But there's no public hysteria, and thus no tax dollars, in that.

about a week ago
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CDC: Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million In 4 Months

taustin Re:eyebrows raised. (275 comments)

They're assuming cases are underreported by a factor of "give us more money."

about a week ago
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CDC: Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million In 4 Months

taustin Re:Meanwhile (275 comments)

As you note, the US has some experience with corrupt government embezzling aid money. Once bitten, twice shy, and all.

about a week ago
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CDC: Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million In 4 Months

taustin Re:Meanwhile (275 comments)

p>I don't care how justified you think you are, but right now you're getting up there with "voting national socialist in 1935" levels of awful.

And I don't care how you think Americans should spend their money, especially when you resort to namecalling and are too ignorant to recognize Godwin's Law, even when it's humping your pantleg.

Maybe we should contact the government of Nigeria and offer them millions in aid, but we need a little seed money to free it up from the bank account it's currently in.

about a week ago
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Small Restaurant Out-Maneuvers Yelp In Reviews War

taustin Re:Only cost them 25 percent of customer bills? (249 comments)

I believe their plan is to deliberately violate Yelp's terms of service - by paying for reviews - to force Yelp to enforce said terms by removing the listing entirely. Which is what the restaurant wants - to not be listed at all.

It's a very clever plan. At best, they get everything they want, and at worst, "real" bad reviews get buried in amongst the snarky ones.

about a week ago
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Canadian Regulator Threatens To Impose New Netflix Regulation

taustin Re:why does the CRTC need this list? (324 comments)

That sounds great until there is a conflict between the laws of different countries, like the Microsoft/Irish data center case. When a company can't obey the laws of one country without breaking the laws of the other, it's not a legal issue involving the company, it's a political issue between two governments.

And if it comes to One World Government taking precedence over all others, it won't be Canada deciding what international law is.

Canada only has jurisdiction over what is can enforce its orders on. If Netflix has no employees or assets in Canada, Canada has no jurisdiction over Netflix.

about two weeks ago
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Verizon Working On a La Carte Internet TV Service

taustin Re:I can't see this happening (108 comments)

a lot of niche content will no longer get funded, so choice might actually be lessened

If not enough people are watching it to get it funded in an al a carte environment, then it's not worth funding in the first place.

about two weeks ago
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CBC Warns Canadians of "US Law Enforcement Money Extortion Program"

taustin Re:Seems reasonable (462 comments)

The Supreme Court has ruled that civil forfeiture laws are, in fact, subject to the restrictions on excessive fines. Very specifically, and as I recall, on a case that involved seizure of money at the border.

Nobody knows about this, and a foreign tourist won't have any inclination to come back to the US - in a year or two, when it comes to trial - and spend more on legal fees than what was stolen.

The only way to stop this is to criminally prosecute corrupt cops. Which happens from time to time, but not nearly enough.

about three weeks ago
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California Tells Businesses: Stop Trying To Ban Consumer Reviews

taustin Re:Re; (275 comments)

If you've got the resources to pursue a class action suit at all, such a restriction can already be challenged as unconscionable.

about three weeks ago
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California Tells Businesses: Stop Trying To Ban Consumer Reviews

taustin Re:hmmmm (275 comments)

Indeed. Those are already inadequately covered by existing law.

about three weeks ago
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California Tells Businesses: Stop Trying To Ban Consumer Reviews

taustin Re:hmmmm (275 comments)

It applies to restrictions on consumer - end customer - reviews, specifically. An NDA on consumer goods is not a common thing; most NDAs apply to employees. And this bill doesn't address that sort of thing at all. Read literally, however, yeah, it does seem to prohibit an NDA that restricts a consumer's right to talk trash about bad services or products. How it gets enforced is anybody's guess. California courts can get pretty stupid sometimes (and remarkably sensible at others).

I got no problem with it, though. If you can't stay in business if your customers talk about your products and services honestly, then you've got far bigger problems than this law.

about three weeks ago
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Comcast Using JavaScript Injection To Serve Ads On Public Wi-Fi Hotspots

taustin Re:Copyright violation? (230 comments)

What a crushing rejoined. I'm going to go commit suicide now out of shame.

about three weeks ago
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Comcast Using JavaScript Injection To Serve Ads On Public Wi-Fi Hotspots

taustin Re:Copyright violation? (230 comments)

Of course there'd be a problem with that. Comcast's users won't pay as much for ad free content as their customers - advertisers - will pay to shove ads down your throat.

about three weeks ago
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Comcast Using JavaScript Injection To Serve Ads On Public Wi-Fi Hotspots

taustin Re:Copyright violation? (230 comments)

And doing so for a commercial purpose. Which, in theory, could make it criminal.

about three weeks ago
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Should Cyborgs Have the Same Privacy Rights As Humans?

taustin Re:There are no new legal issues (206 comments)

Nothing new there, either. Arguments over whether black people were human go back centuries, for instance. Some still argue over it today. You kind of remind me of them.

about three weeks ago
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Should Cyborgs Have the Same Privacy Rights As Humans?

taustin Re:There are no new legal issues (206 comments)

A cyborg is a cyborg. You do not get to make up a definition in order to limit the discusion of it.

Where legal definitions are concerned, neither do you. And it still doesn't matter. Current law covers it without even stretching.

I purposely created a fictional scenarii in order to

Change the subject, and not answer the real point: current law covers implanted technology in one of two ways, and does so quite thoroughly.

exempt bias but if you do not think it is theoreticaly possible, i suggest you pay more attention. They are recording brain waves as we speak in order to make prosthetics as transparent as possible. If they can relay and replay those signal to prothetics, it isn't unimaginable that it could be done for the real thing. And yes, science fiction has already done it.

Interpreting the equivalent of a mouse signal and replaying memories are not even qualitatively the same thing, and we have already proven, quite conclusively, how inaccurate memory can be, even of one's own actions. The chances of such a system being reliable enough to be admissible are zero within the lifetimes of anyone alive today. And even if such technology were developed, current law still covers it.

Once again, and I'll use small words this time:

Either it is an electronic device, and the laws covering the search of computers and cell phones covers it - show probably cause and you get a warrant.

Or it's part of the body, and decades old case law covering forced collection of biometric evidence - DNA, fingerprints, blood samples - covers it. Show probably cause, and you get a warrant.

There's no difference, legally.

about three weeks ago

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