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Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

techno-vampire Re:So perhaps /. will finally fix its shit (389 comments)

We are living in a world where the west is increasingly persecuting people for ideas.

There's nothing new about this. If you look at history, you'll see things like this happening over and over. Look at how Rome treated Christians, look at the Spanish Inquisition and their expulsion of Jews, look at the Holocaust, look at Stalin's Great Purge. For that matter, remember that the Pilgrims weren't interested in letting everybody worship they way they wanted, they were interested in creating a colony where everybody had to worship the way the Pilgrims said they should. Up until recently, the US has been an exception to the general trend of mankind to punish anybody who doesn't think the same way as the ruler does, but I'm afraid that this is coming to an end. That doesn't mean that we shouldn't fight the trend, just that we shouldn't fool ourselves by thinking that this is something new in the world, because it isn't.

2 days ago
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Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

techno-vampire Re:Stupid (389 comments)

I have my own website, but it's just a vanity site. Why do I need to get a certificate and use https?

2 days ago
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11 Trillion Gallons of Water Needed To End California Drought

techno-vampire Re:Go figure (322 comments)

That may be so, but the San Joaquin Valley is only the southernmost part of the Central Valley. And, a large part of the irrigation water comes from the northern half of the valley, AKA the Sacramento Valley which normally has more water than it needs.

3 days ago
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11 Trillion Gallons of Water Needed To End California Drought

techno-vampire Re:Go figure (322 comments)

Most of California isn't desert, only parts of Southern California. As an example, the Central Valley, the state's biggest agricultural area isn't, nor are the wine growing areas near San Francisco, and yet, they're being hit by the drought just as badly.

3 days ago
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Graphene: Fast, Strong, Cheap, and Impossible To Use

techno-vampire Re:James Tour made me a Comp Sci (187 comments)

That class proved to me that I was not, in fact, a chemical engineer.

If so, taking it wasn't a mistake because it kept you from spending years learning something you weren't really cut out for. And, if you count in the tuition money you saved, it may have been the best thing you ever did while at Rice.

4 days ago
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US Navy Authorizes Use of Laser In Combat

techno-vampire Re:End of flight as we know it (225 comments)

Armor tends to be heavy...

Armor designed to protect against impact gets heavy, very fast. Armor against lasers, maybe not, but I think we need to think in terms of shielding, not armor because that includes ablative protection which may not be as massive. And yes, there's a trade off, as shown by the fact that the bursting charge in an armor piercing shell is much smaller than what's used in a bombardment round. The problem, of course, is working out the optimal balance, and I have no idea how that's done, but I'm sure that the people designing these things know how to decide how much shielding is enough.

about a week ago
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US Navy Authorizes Use of Laser In Combat

techno-vampire Re:End of flight as we know it (225 comments)

Part of penetration comes from mass and momentum. That's why the fuse of an armor piercing shell is at the back and has a time delay. Assuming that the impact velocity isn't lowered, more mass means more momentum. And, of course, if you can't increase the velocity, the only way to increase the impact energy is to increase the mass, which is why musket balls were so big.

I think we're both in agreement here that armor piercing isn't the main issue any more, although I'd be willing to argue that maybe it should be. I'm just trying to explain why I think that some sort of shielding, either reflective or ablative (if not both) isn't a waste of mass on a missile that's going against a laser defense.

about a week ago
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US Navy Authorizes Use of Laser In Combat

techno-vampire Re:End of flight as we know it (225 comments)

'Most' Missiles are a hell of a lot lighter than a 16" shell.

Well, yes. Of course. I quoted those figures simply to show the difference (both in total mass and bursting charge) between an armor piercing and a bombardment round because I happen to know them. And, BTW, I'm not sure if the max range is quite right because back when I was in Uncle Sam's Navy, they were listed as reaching out to 25 nautical (not statute) miles. That 38km might be right, I just don't have either the time nor the inclination to calculate it for myself and it's not exactly important. Just thought I'd mention it.

about a week ago
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US Navy Authorizes Use of Laser In Combat

techno-vampire Re:End of flight as we know it (225 comments)

You miss my point. Shielding on a missile isn't wasted mass. Either it protects the weapon from the laser or its mass does extra damage to the target. (You can think of it as extra shrapnel if you want.) Within reasonable limits, it's a win-win situation. I gave the details on the 16" shells just as an example.

about a week ago
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US Navy Authorizes Use of Laser In Combat

techno-vampire Re:End of flight as we know it (225 comments)

Not all of the damage is done by the warhead, some of it comes from mass and momentum, and any shielding that survives until the missile hits just adds to that effect. In fact, most of the weight of a classic armor-piercing shell is simply a mass of metal in front of the bursting charge (with a time-delay fuse) that's intended to batter its way into (and if possible through) the target's armor before the warhead detonates. As an example, a 16 inch armor piercing shell weighs 2700 pounds of which only 150 pounds are HE. Bombardment rounds are 2200 pounds, including 500 pounds of HE.

about two weeks ago
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A Paper By Maggie Simpson and Edna Krabappel Was Accepted By Two Journals

techno-vampire Re:Atlanta Nights by Travis Tea (100 comments)

If you think that's bad, the 1969 hoax, Naked Came the Stranger was a best seller and remained popular even after the hoax was revealed. The story, such as it was, had no cultural, social or literary merit but was filled with gratuitous sex scenes. In fact, parts of it had to be heavily edited because they were too well written.

about two weeks ago
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A Paper By Maggie Simpson and Edna Krabappel Was Accepted By Two Journals

techno-vampire Re:now I know where to publish (100 comments)

I don't know how things are done now, but back when I was in school, we were assigned to write essays by word count, not page count for exactly that reason. And, that's why writers talk about how many words they've written recently, not how many pages because page counts are much easier to inflate than word counts. (Double spacing, large fonts and bigger margins can make the same number of words fill more pages.)

about two weeks ago
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A Paper By Maggie Simpson and Edna Krabappel Was Accepted By Two Journals

techno-vampire Re:Great but (100 comments)

That would be appropriate, especially if one of the co-authors was Gracie Bermudez.

about two weeks ago
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Utilities Face Billions In Losses From Distributed Renewables

techno-vampire Re:Predictions (280 comments)

Nobody can predict the future...

I beg to differ. Anybody can predict the future, and millions of people do it every day, when they buy a lottery ticket, bet on a horse, play the stock market or put money into a retirement plan. What I think you mean is that nobody can accurately or reliably predict the future.

about two weeks ago
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Book Review: Spam Nation

techno-vampire Re:Strunk & White Rolling Over... (82 comments)

If I were to say, "that's clearly begging the question: where did she go?", and you assumed a definition of "assuming the conclusion of an argument" in that sentence, what would that even *mean*?

It would mean that your question assumes that she went someplace but that it hasn't been established that she has actually gone anywhere. It's kind of like the old question, "When did you stop beating your wife?" Not only does it assume that you are married it also assumes that at one time you were in the habit of beating her, neither of which facts are generally established before the question is asked.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Files a Copyright Infringement Lawsuit For Activating Pirated Software

techno-vampire Re:Courts should punish intentional facilitation (268 comments)

But where the hell do you think I should plug in a few dozen dongles?

If they're built right, you daisy chain them. Back in the Good Old Days before USB, dongles were plugged into the printer port and each one had another parallel port on the back. That way, you could have as many dongles as you needed plugged in, and still use your printer. No reason you couldn't do that today, including having the last item in the chain being your USB printer.

about two weeks ago
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Sony Employees Receive Email Threat From Hackers: 'Your Family Will Be In Danger'

techno-vampire Re:I heard that this was about... (184 comments)

Ethics and journalism do not belong in the same sentence without negation, e.g., "There is no ethics in journalism."

about two weeks ago
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Preferred Type of Game?

techno-vampire Re:One of the best card games... (171 comments)

Shrug! For me, at least a much better game is Oh Hell. The fact that the number of tricks never equals the number available means that somebody is going set on every hand. Not only that, but a hand can change from being underbid (at least one trick nobody wants) to overbid (not enough available) in the middle of a hand without warning because a player can't make their bid and is trying to "take company."

about two weeks ago
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Aliens Are Probably Everywhere, Just Not Anywhere Nearby

techno-vampire Re:Drakes Equation is bullshit (334 comments)

Measuring the sides of a triangle only proves that it does or doesn't conform to the Pythagorean Theorem. To prove it, you must demonstrate that correctly describes all applicable triangles.

about two weeks ago
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New Effort To Grant Legal Rights To Chimpanzees Fails

techno-vampire Re:Wrong name (341 comments)

For that matter, how many Slashdotters remember Tommy any more? There's so, so much of yesterday's pop culture that's just been forgotten because today's youth just doesn't care. Of course, you and I grew up back when most of the movies you saw on TV were from the '30s or '40s, so we got exposed to it and (sometimes) learned to appreciate it whether we wanted to or not.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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America's first police auto-gyro

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 3 years ago

techno-vampire writes "The auto-gyro isn't a new idea; the first successful flight for one was in January 1923. What is new is that police in Tomball, Texas are experimenting with them for aerial surveillance. With a price tag of only $75,000 and operational costs of $50/hour, they're considerably more cost-effective than helicopters."
Link to Original Source
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Another AGW alarmist rescued from Arctic

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 4 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "The Herald Sun reports that TOM Smitheringale wanted to prove the world was warming. Now he's another alarmist with frostbite.

It goes on to say that this is actually now the fourth year running that warming alarmists have had to be rescued from expeditions to prove the Arctic is warmer than it actually is. It's a metaphor.

According to the article, AGW alarmists have repeatedly needed to be rescued during publicity stunts trying to raise awareness of the melting Arctic ice cap because of brutal sub-zero weather conditions on the currently thickening ice sheet."

Link to Original Source
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Charles Darwin's best-kept secret

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 4 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "Two hundred years ago, Ascension Island was a barren volcanic edifice.

Today, its peaks are covered by lush tropical "cloud forest".

What happened in the interim is the amazing story of how the architect of evolution, Kew Gardens and the Royal Navy conspired to build a fully functioning, but totally artificial ecosystem.

By a bizarre twist, this great imperial experiment may hold the key to the future colonisation of Mars."

Link to Original Source
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Which Linux distro should I choose?

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 5 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "Currently, I'm using Fedora Linux on my desktop, and Puppy Linux on my very old laptop. I do tech support for my sister, who uses Ubuntu Linux. Now, I have a chance to get a brand-new, modern laptop and it occurs to me that this is a chance to broaden my Linux knowledge. The new laptop will mostly be used for browsing, email and wordprocessing, with gaming a minor consideration. If you were me, which Linux distro would you install, and why?"
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Ocean Circulation Doesn't Work As Expected

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 5 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "The familiar model of Atlantic ocean currents that shows a discrete "conveyor belt" of deep, cold water flowing southward from the Labrador Sea is probably all wet. New research led by Duke University and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution relied on an armada of sophisticated floats to show that much of this water, originating in the sea between Newfoundland and Greenland, is diverted generally eastward by the time it flows as far south as Massachusetts. From there it disburses to the depths in complex ways that are difficult to follow. A 50-year-old model of ocean currents had shown this southbound subsurface flow of cold water forming a continuous loop with the familiar northbound flow of warm water on the surface, called the Gulf Stream. "Everybody always thought this deep flow operated like a conveyor belt, but what we are saying is that concept doesn't hold anymore," said Duke oceanographer Susan Lozier. "So it's going to be more difficult to measure these climate change signals in the deep ocean.""
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Using DNA to identify soldiers MIA

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 6 years ago

techno-vampire writes "According to an article at Military.com, the Army is trying to get DNA samples from about 6,300 families of soldiers MIA from WWII, Korea and Vietnam. These will be put in a databank and used to (they hope) identify the remains of servicemen who would otherwise remain nameless. The article includes both a phone number and an email address for contact."
Link to Original Source
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New rootkit from Sony

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 7 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "An article in The Register reports that a new USB fingerprint authentication device from Sony repeats the CD rootkit exploit of two years ago. The MicroVault USM-F fingerprint reader software bundled with the stick installs a hidden directory under Windows. Either they didn't learn from the PR nightmare last time, or they really thought they'd get away with it this time, but in either case, smooth move, Mr. ExLax!"
Link to Original Source

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