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Comments

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My toy collection is ...

techno-vampire Just what kind of "toy" are we talking about? (206 comments)

I have some friends who are involved in BDSM. They tend to refer to the various objects they use with their partners as "toys." If that's what this poll is asking about, I'm going to have to change my answer.

4 days ago
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My resting heart rate:

techno-vampire That depends (169 comments)

Normally, my resting heart rate is in the 70s. However, if I run out of atenolol, my tachycardia takes over, driving it up into the 90s.

about two weeks ago
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UK's National Health Service Moves To NoSQL Running On an Open-Source Stack

techno-vampire Re:Complex? (198 comments)

What is a complex message? One with a real part and an imaginary part.

about three weeks ago
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Surprising Result of NYC Bike Lanes: Faster Traffic for Cars

techno-vampire Re:No Fucking Shit (213 comments)

The dedicated left-hand turn lane is probably considerably older than most of Slashdot's readership. I remember seeing them in San Diego in the mid to late 1950s, and they reached Los Angels, where my family was living, within a very few years. I won't say that San Diego had them first, but if not, they were a definite early adopter.

about three weeks ago
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Is It Time To Split Linux Distros In Two?

techno-vampire Re:Hogwash (282 comments)

There are lots and lots of people out there who use Linux for numerical number-crunching and scientific tasks.

I run Fedora Linux on my desktop and keep it running 24/7. One of the reasons is that I always have BOINC running in the background, doing work for The World Community Grid and Einstein@home. This way, I can be using my computer to help others even when I'm asleep, or away from home.

about three weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

techno-vampire Re:Science creates understanding of a real world. (770 comments)

But that some consensus views are wrong does not mean all consensus views are wrong.

That's exactly correct. It does, however, demonstrate that consensus in and of itself is not a form of scientific proof and that people who keep saying, "We have a consensus, the science is settled." simply don't understand how science works.

about three weeks ago
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DNA sequencing of coffee's best use:

techno-vampire Re:Context (228 comments)

Dark roast is one thing; burnt is another, and that's what I'm objecting to.

about three weeks ago
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DNA sequencing of coffee's best use:

techno-vampire Re:Context (228 comments)

...especially any extraneous bitterness to make room for the bitterness of caffeine.

My understanding is that most of that bitterness comes from over-roasting and burning the beans, which is why Charbux coffee tastes the way it does. (How they've managed to make so many people believe that's the way coffee is supposed to taste is something I'll never know.) On the rare occasions that I'm stuck with either that or nothing, I always make sure to have some salt with me. Just a few grains of salt neutralizes the bitterness and makes their coffee drinkable.

about three weeks ago
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FAA Scans the Internet For Drone Users; Sends Cease and Desist Letters

techno-vampire Re:Pecoins? (222 comments)

It looks like the OCR screwed up.

It's not so bad that the OCR screwed up; programs do that once in a while. The big problem is that nobody bothered to proofread the output to catch any glitches. And it's not just a one-time thing. I've bought a few ebooks that are scanned and OCR'd versions of dead-tree books and so far, not one of them's been proofread. The problem here isn't that OCR isn't perfect, it's that the people using it think that it is.

about three weeks ago
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Is There a Creativity Deficit In Science?

techno-vampire Re:10,000 Leagues (203 comments)

Is 10,000 Leagues Under the Sea considered science?

I don't know; I've never heard of it. By any chance are you referring to Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea? If so, most definitely, because the book accurately predicted a number of features that later became standard on submarines.

about a month ago
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You Got Your Windows In My Linux

techno-vampire Re:What's wrong with Windows Server? (613 comments)

Gnome and KDE are no more difficult to configure than Windows or Mac.

True, but not relevant, at least in a server environment. Most of your servers probably won't have a GUI, or even a monitor, being administered by ssh and a CLI. For those few boxes that need a GUI, you're much better off with Xfce, Enlightenment or some other lightweight DE that doesn't suck up such a large percentage of your RAM and CPU cycles, leaving you with more resources to devote to work. And, even if they do take a little more time to configure, so what? It's a one time task, and trivial to copy from one box to another as needed.

about a month ago
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No, a Stolen iPod Didn't Brick Ben Eberle's Prosthetic Hand

techno-vampire Re:Notice how they refused to address the issue (122 comments)

If you'd bothered to RTFA, you might have kept your foot out of your mouth: "The money will come from the government, but a new hand is worth $75,000, authorities said."

Oh you Republicans are all alike.

Yet another pointless, irrelevant unproven argumentum ad hominum from an aptly named Anonymous COWARD.

about a month ago
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No, a Stolen iPod Didn't Brick Ben Eberle's Prosthetic Hand

techno-vampire Re:Notice how they refused to address the issue (122 comments)

What made you think that the vet got screwed over? He lost his legs and his arm, meaning that his disability is service connected and he's responsible for none of the costs related to it. I know; I have a minor service connected disability (hearing loss caused by being around too much outbound shore bombardment back in '72) and all of my hearing aids, batteries, repair and replacement are done at no charge.

about a month ago
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Fish Raised On Land Give Clues To How Early Animals Left the Seas

techno-vampire One good meme... (62 comments)

No, no, no! You have it backwards. Here on Soviet Slashdot, developmental plasticity fish overlords welcome you!

about a month ago
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How the Ancient Egyptians (Should Have) Built the Pyramids

techno-vampire Re:Corroborating Hieroglyphics? (202 comments)

b) They brought the stones in on boats, why couldn't they bring the wood as well?

For the ancient Egyptians, stone was a local resource. Wood, for the most part, had to be imported, and was much more expensive and less durable.

about a month ago
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How the Ancient Egyptians (Should Have) Built the Pyramids

techno-vampire Re:Corroborating Hieroglyphics? (202 comments)

There's another fact that this theory ignores: Moving the blocks this way takes wood. Lots and lots of wood. Egypt has never had large quantities of wood, and had to import most of what it used. Doing it this way would have been far, far more expensive than dragging them across the sand.

about a month ago
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

techno-vampire Re:dont know, don't care as long as ... (826 comments)

I don't know about other distros, but Fedora handled the change very smoothly. All you needed to do was use the approved upgrade tool (I don't remember, off-hand if it was still using preupgrade or had switched to fedup.) to download all the packages, reboot into the upgrade and when it completed and you rebooted into your freshly upgraded system, it was using systemd instead of init. Unless you had a reason to check, you never needed to know about the change.

about a month ago
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Slashdot Asks: How Prepared Are You For an Earthquake?

techno-vampire Re:Not at all (191 comments)

The server rooms all had UPS and passive air vent, but they were across the street. The building I worked in only had things like Tech Support, Customer Service and Sales.

about a month ago

Submissions

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America's first police auto-gyro

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  about 3 years ago

techno-vampire writes "The auto-gyro isn't a new idea; the first successful flight for one was in January 1923. What is new is that police in Tomball, Texas are experimenting with them for aerial surveillance. With a price tag of only $75,000 and operational costs of $50/hour, they're considerably more cost-effective than helicopters."
Link to Original Source
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Another AGW alarmist rescued from Arctic

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  about 4 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "The Herald Sun reports that TOM Smitheringale wanted to prove the world was warming. Now he's another alarmist with frostbite.

It goes on to say that this is actually now the fourth year running that warming alarmists have had to be rescued from expeditions to prove the Arctic is warmer than it actually is. It's a metaphor.

According to the article, AGW alarmists have repeatedly needed to be rescued during publicity stunts trying to raise awareness of the melting Arctic ice cap because of brutal sub-zero weather conditions on the currently thickening ice sheet."

Link to Original Source
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Charles Darwin's best-kept secret

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 3 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "Two hundred years ago, Ascension Island was a barren volcanic edifice.

Today, its peaks are covered by lush tropical "cloud forest".

What happened in the interim is the amazing story of how the architect of evolution, Kew Gardens and the Royal Navy conspired to build a fully functioning, but totally artificial ecosystem.

By a bizarre twist, this great imperial experiment may hold the key to the future colonisation of Mars."

Link to Original Source
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Which Linux distro should I choose?

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 5 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "Currently, I'm using Fedora Linux on my desktop, and Puppy Linux on my very old laptop. I do tech support for my sister, who uses Ubuntu Linux. Now, I have a chance to get a brand-new, modern laptop and it occurs to me that this is a chance to broaden my Linux knowledge. The new laptop will mostly be used for browsing, email and wordprocessing, with gaming a minor consideration. If you were me, which Linux distro would you install, and why?"
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Ocean Circulation Doesn't Work As Expected

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 5 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "The familiar model of Atlantic ocean currents that shows a discrete "conveyor belt" of deep, cold water flowing southward from the Labrador Sea is probably all wet. New research led by Duke University and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution relied on an armada of sophisticated floats to show that much of this water, originating in the sea between Newfoundland and Greenland, is diverted generally eastward by the time it flows as far south as Massachusetts. From there it disburses to the depths in complex ways that are difficult to follow. A 50-year-old model of ocean currents had shown this southbound subsurface flow of cold water forming a continuous loop with the familiar northbound flow of warm water on the surface, called the Gulf Stream. "Everybody always thought this deep flow operated like a conveyor belt, but what we are saying is that concept doesn't hold anymore," said Duke oceanographer Susan Lozier. "So it's going to be more difficult to measure these climate change signals in the deep ocean.""
Link to Original Source
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Using DNA to identify soldiers MIA

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 5 years ago

techno-vampire writes "According to an article at Military.com, the Army is trying to get DNA samples from about 6,300 families of soldiers MIA from WWII, Korea and Vietnam. These will be put in a databank and used to (they hope) identify the remains of servicemen who would otherwise remain nameless. The article includes both a phone number and an email address for contact."
Link to Original Source
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New rootkit from Sony

techno-vampire techno-vampire writes  |  more than 7 years ago

techno-vampire (666512) writes "An article in The Register reports that a new USB fingerprint authentication device from Sony repeats the CD rootkit exploit of two years ago. The MicroVault USM-F fingerprint reader software bundled with the stick installs a hidden directory under Windows. Either they didn't learn from the PR nightmare last time, or they really thought they'd get away with it this time, but in either case, smooth move, Mr. ExLax!"
Link to Original Source

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