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Ask Slashdot: Why So Hard Landing Interviews In Seattle Versus SoCal?

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:Demand for Microsoft Skills Declining? (506 comments)

"At home we have 2 Linux workstations (3, if you count my old development box I normally keep powered down), 2 Linux laptops, 2 Android phones, an Apple desktop, and an iPhone - for 2 adults and a teenager. Note no Microsoft boxen."

Well, I guess MS should fold up their business and go home. Because nobody anywhere is still using them on the desktop...

about 4 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why So Hard Landing Interviews In Seattle Versus SoCal?

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:Get a local phone number (506 comments)

Actually, Seattle has a lot of local tech people that are employeed by MS and Amazon. Not so many highly qualified . (The company I work for opened up to remote working specifically because it was so hard to find top-tier talent due to MS and Amazon brain-drain, and it's worked out very well for us. )

about 4 months ago
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Toronto Family Bans All Technology In Their Home Made After 1986

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:Like with everything else, moderation (534 comments)

From my point of view, it seems that a lot of parents often forget that children can be very different, even at the same age. It's easy to say "yes, of course the same thing won't work with every child!", but it seems that often people will stop right there, and not consider the reason that some children are different and that the answer "just try Y instead of X" isn't always an option

This is true to an extent. There are a lot of differences among children, and anything you do has to be tailored to the nature and personality of your child.. However, there are also a lot of similarities. Children respond well overall to limts being set and enforced. So set limits. Explain the limits.Enforce them. Explain again (after they're enforced). Because if you don't enforce them, you teach that your limits aren't really limts at all, and they keep pushing them further out. It doesn't mean they won't push them anyway[1] but a consistent response means they know how far they *can* push and what's ok.[2]

When I was a kid (I'm 35), TV time was very limited, especially during the day when there were other things we could do. When we finally got a computer, time on it was limited as well. I even remember wanting to be outside with my Dad over watching daytime cartoons or whatever. It's not choosing the great outdoors over technology, and I hope you realize this.

Of course I do, and that is a valid point. My son is an active boy, but even so I understand that were the choice different - for example, TV with Dad vs outside with Dad - the answer might be different as well. Because when it's "with Dad" in either case, it boils down to whatever the child prefers to do. But my point was that to encourage time outside, I don't give the choice of TV with Dad in most cases. Instead it's time [by himself] using electronics, or time [with me] outside doing stuff. [3] And to a three year old in that's no choice at all - no matter how much he loves watching Bob the Builder.

[1] - most children will push limits. hell mine thinks it's awesome to start sticking appendages into a room I've told him he can't be in. The intent is clear: "you told me I can't be in the kitchen right now, but I'm not - I'm exactly on the threshold and my *hand* is in the kitchen".
[2] -. The answer to this (again in my experience and in my observations) is not to make every limit an absolute thing, except in areas of safety where failure can mean serious injury [2.1]. Set the limit. Know *in advance* how far you will let them push it, and the reasoning behind it (because they will ask and you should have an answer -- after they listen, or else it turns into a negotiation.)
[2.1] No he may never run away from me in the parking lot. Ever. Immediate response to any attempt to do so. On the other hand: I will warn you against the consequences of standing on that stool on the carpeted floor -- but I will not stop you from doing it. Nor will anybody comfort you when you fall down and get hurt. I'll warn you of that, too.
[2] - I say unequivocably enforce limits. This doesn't mean demand instant obedience, but rather know the limit you want to set, know how far you will allow the child to push that limit - and be consistent.
[3] Giving choices - even rigged, loaded choices - is a really important part of parenting, I think. (Perhaps especially the rigged, loaded questions) It took me a while to learn that. Longer still to learn that even very young kids can understand reasoning and choices fairly well. Much better to say, "You can stay here and watch TV while I work in the yard, or you can come outside with me and help." As opposed to either a) not giving the choice because it would much easier for my life to get the yardwork done alone, or b) simply dictating "thou must exit the house fortwith and accompany me now - so sayeth the Lord Dad Thy Father"

about 7 months ago
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Toronto Family Bans All Technology In Their Home Made After 1986

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:Like with everything else, moderation (534 comments)

Even though I agree with what you're saying, moderation is something that is hard to achieve if you're already out of control. Moderation is hard to achieve unless you have a concrete goal. Moderation is hard to achieve if you're a young child.

I am not following this logic. Of course moderation is hard to achieve if you're a young child - that's why children have parents.

(I use "you'" in the hypothetical sense below.)

If you are the parent, be the parent. You can tell your child no. You will survive if your child gets angry at you and acts out. You'll even survive the oh-so-dreadful embarassment if he does so in public place. You can manage through the inconvenience caused by actually having to attend your child instead of handing over a gadget to entertain him. You do not have to give him what he wants - because you are the parent.

Yes, by all means, explain WHY - always explain why.. Even at 2 or 3 yrs, children understand a lot more than most people think they do. But don't lose sight of the fact that it's not a negotiation. Explain why *after* your expectation is met. Discuss it *after* the behavior has stopped.

You are not your child's friend, you are his parent. Friendship can come later, if he survives through is twenties long enough to grow into a reasonable facsimile of a human being.

about 7 months ago
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Toronto Family Bans All Technology In Their Home Made After 1986

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:Like with everything else, moderation (534 comments)

f you don't want your kids using your tablets or phones, don't let them. I have no trouble letting my kids use the tablets and the phones. At the same time I don't let them play on them all day long. If they finish their homework and chores, they get some play time. And if they want to play a game on the tablet during their play time, well what is so wrong with that?

Exactly this. Set limits. Stick to them. Remember who is the parent and who is the chid. If you don't want your child using more than X amount of tech, then there is *no* excuse in the world for them to be getting away with doing so.

My kid (3) likes to get time on a tablet, and time watching TV. But given a choice between tablet, tv, or 'working' in the yard with me (eg, poking at the dirt with his tools and periodically helping me when he's interested), he'll pick the yard every time.

On average he's allowed a combined 45 mintues of screen time in a day, though sometimes he'll get more and sometimes less. On days when there is no screen time it's generally because he or we are wrapped up doing other things. He doesn't sneak around trying to get to this stuff if we're not watching closely- he knows he's not allowed. He also knows that these things are privileges that can and sometimes do get taken away for bad behavior. When that happens he gets mad and cries and screams - but then gets over it goes playing happily with such high tech toys such as Legos .

I see parents on a regular basis who just hand their phones over to their toddlers withotu a second thought, and this just baffles me. I see some of those parents try to refuse, the kid starts whining/crying, and the parent hands over the device anyway. This baffles me too. As a parent, your job is not to cater to your child's every whim. It is not to shut your child up with a gadget because actually tending your child isinconvenient to your life. Your job is to be a parent.

about 7 months ago
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Sexist Presentations At Startup Competition Prompt TechCrunch Apology

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:Congratulations (762 comments)

Seriously? Disliking people and groups of people who significantly differ is something humans have done throughout recorded history. Surely if it were just as simple as accepting enlightenment, this would have stopped millenia ago.

It happens. It's part of human nature.

Classism.
Racism.
Sexism.
You-don''t-look-like-me-ism.
You-don't-speak-like-I-do-ism.

It's all the same. And - since throughout recorded histroy we've not risen above it - I think it's safe to say that it's part of our make up.

about 7 months ago
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Sexist Presentations At Startup Competition Prompt TechCrunch Apology

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:Congratulations (762 comments)

Unfortunately it doesn't work that way.

Sure, people can laugh about this stuff.

Women can laugh about jokes about women.
LGBT can laugh about jokes targeting them.
Blacks can laugh about jokes targeting them.

Lots of laughter,

Just don't laugh at something targeting a group you're not a part of. You don't have that right - because the second you do, you're oppressing them and disdaining all that they've fought for.

about 7 months ago
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BlackBerry Cuts 250 Workers, Calls It Efficiency

thePowerOfGrayskull Dice.com opinion piece? (68 comments)

A dice.com opinion piece with clickbait headline? That's what we're getting here alongside our daily ration of infoworld articles?

I really need to take my own advice and not bother coming back - but somehow, I still end up doing it every week or two.

about 9 months ago
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BlackBerry Cuts 250 Workers, Calls It Efficiency

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:250?! (68 comments)

Why concern ourselves with facts when we can get a good baseless bash on?

about 9 months ago
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BlackBerry Helps Indian Gov't Spy On Users' Messages

thePowerOfGrayskull Just stop. (56 comments)

What a predictable clickbait title. I come by here every few weeks (less and less often, honestly - too much crap is just filtering through from populate media conglomerates) and am always able to find something on the front page that reminds me why I've taken to staying away.

But for old time's sake, I'll bite.

- RIM gave access to BIS communications when lawfully requested. This isn't new - they do it for every major government that submits legal requests. The fact that they'd do it for India was resolved months ago, in mid-2012 I think.
- RIM still has not and cannot give access to BES communications. THAT is what the battle with India is about - INdia said "you will give us ALL communications". RIM said "SOrry, we literally just can't do that.". India said "Do it or GTFO". RIM said "Sorry, we really just... can't". India realized this was true, and a big deal was made about the fact that theyr eceived BIS access (like any other government, for any service - not just RIM).
- It was face-saving, because they could not get what they actually insisted on getting - BES. Because the claim was that *BES* was used to planning subversive activities, not consumer BBM and email.
- they've given India no more than another other government. And they give the US government considerably less than any other government.

On that topic: you'll also notice that BlackBerry is NOT on the list of companies assisting NSA with Prism efforts. They do comply with lawful requests for specific data (as long as it's not BES, which they have no access to). But they do NOT hand over data in bulk, unlike all of their competition.

about 9 months ago
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Jolla Announces First Meego Phone Available By End 2013

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:looking forward to it (152 comments)

Interesting. On paper, it satisfies many of my requirements, but I just hated the last Blackberry device I had... I think I'm going to wait for Ubuntu, MeeGo, and Firefox OS.

The last blackberry device you had ran an outdated J2ME-based OS. The new one is built atop the POSIX-compliant QNX kernel and in many ways (though not all) is better technology than is offered by the competition. Not specs, but underlying capabilities.

I'd suggest trying it out before discardng it out of hand. Also - no reason not to develop for both. Qt apps will run just fine on BB10 with minor tweaking, and I suspect on Sailfish as well.

about a year ago
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Jolla Announces First Meego Phone Available By End 2013

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:market share? (152 comments)

Android started as a tiny project, too.

Android started as a tiny project when the sum total of the smartphone market was approximately the size of the number of devices that Samsung or Apple sells in a quarter now.

It's a different world. I wish them luck, but it's an uphill battle.

And the answer to your question is, as always, to be technically superior.

BB has tried that route with BB10. It's yet to be determined if they'll succeed - but certainly it's not enough on its own.

In this case in particular, compatibility with Android apps is a pretty good start, too, making switching much less painful.

See above.

about a year ago
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Jolla Announces First Meego Phone Available By End 2013

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:sweet (152 comments)

So what you're saying is that you want a BlackBerry? ;)

Legacy OS and BB OS 10 both offer this feature. The user is in control for the most part - OS10 doesn't do it quite as well as legacy BB, but it still does it.

about a year ago
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Jolla Announces First Meego Phone Available By End 2013

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:sweet (152 comments)

I haven't seen the sources for sailfish yet, but I gather many of the people at Jolla didn't like the portions of the os that were shipped binary only while they were at nokia. So I'd expect the openness to improve. ... snip ... If a user-centric design philosophy (including openness/freedom) doesn't really matter to you

I hadn't noticed where the folks at Jolla had committed to an open source stack, do you have a reference?

about a year ago
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97% of Climate Science Papers Agree Global Warming Is Man-made

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:BUYING SLASHDOT ACCOUNTS (1105 comments)

Nobody is making an argument for anthropomorphic global warming - that is, global warming with human-like characteristics.

Sorry. Couldn't resist.

about a year ago
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BBM Coming To iOS and Android

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:Excellent! (146 comments)

Nice to know you've looked sometime in the last two years ;)

about a year ago
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BBM Coming To iOS and Android

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:It was inevitable ... (146 comments)

They gave India what every other government gets: consumer messages when proper legal channels are followed. This isn't new or surprising, it's required by law. Every messaging platform provides it.

They have not and cannot give access to business messages because they do not own the keys that businesses use to encrypt their data within BES. So if you're using bes for BBM, you're still safe.

  If you aren't, you were never safe from a subpoena. If there is no subpoena your data is not interceptable even as a consumer.

about a year ago
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Facebook To Introduce Video Ads

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:that is a massive rip-off of my data allotment (180 comments)

I would wager the various adblocking tools will be updated to handle these new Facebook ads pretty quickly. You would think that by now marketers would have learned that people will generally let ads slide as long as they are unobtrusive, but these 'HEY LOOK AT ME!' ones always end up with people either avoiding the site or installing blocking software. These ads just don't work.

I guess we are seeing yet another new generation of marketers learning old lessons, or old marketers who have rising through the ranks and not learned a think for the last 20 years.

You would think that by now people would have learned that their own experiences does not equate to those of most people ;)

Most people don't use ad blocking software. Most people don't actually know it exists.

Most people accept that the Internet is all full of ads, and will continue to frequent sites laden with them because they don't realize there's a choice.

We know this is true because the advertising business remains extremely profitable - which only happens when ad impressions are made.

about a year ago
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Facebook To Introduce Video Ads

thePowerOfGrayskull Re:that is a massive rip-off of my data allotment (180 comments)

I also have no FB account anymoer, and I have to say that you're not as right as you might think.

Sure, you get communication with people when you initiate conversations - but if you want to just keep up-to-date on what your friends are doing in life without having to pester them about, it's gotten much harder for the facebook-disconnected to do.

about a year ago

Submissions

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The future arrives: robot dragonflies

thePowerOfGrayskull thePowerOfGrayskull writes  |  about a year and a half ago

thePowerOfGrayskull writes "I remember reading a story years ago about a dragonfly-like robot that could be controlled by a human for reconnaissance and other purposes. More recently, Michael Crichton and Richard Preston explored a related concept. But now it seems science-fiction is on its way to becoming reality, with this indie-gogo project from a team out of Georgia Tech. While the project page is light on details — no mention of battery life or range, among other things — it certainly bears watching."
Link to Original Source
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thePowerOfGrayskull thePowerOfGrayskull writes  |  more than 7 years ago

thePowerOfGrayskull writes "According to this article on CNET a Microsoft-sponsored report has found that six school districts in Indiana are choosing to pay for Windows licenses instead of taking advantage of the low cost linux-based desktops that many other districts are adopting.

From the article:

"The school districts interviewed for this study choose Microsoft solutions because they believe that Microsoft provides reliability, adaptability and a long-term vision for its partners in education," said the IDC report, by analysts James Pettler and Thom Rubel. "Reliability, adaptability and a long-term vision come together to maximize organizational efficiency, the learning experience, and taxpayer investment in education."


Of course, this isn't as significant as it first appears — considering that it's only six out of well over 200 school districts in the state."

Journals

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Adblock and misunderstood posts...

thePowerOfGrayskull thePowerOfGrayskull writes  |  more than 4 years ago There seems to be some confusion around my comments here. I get responses that mostly seem to say that site owners deserve what they get when they use obnoxious ads; and that posters will be damned if anyone tells THEM how to browse.

I disagree with neither of those. The point I was trying to make is that the web site owners have the /right/ to do whatever they want - including the posting of obnoxious, gouge-your-eyes-out advertisements. They even have the /right/ to try to force you to view those advertisements - this is their server, and they have control over how they want to run it.

I am not saying they will succeed in this - obviously there are many ways around any restriction in this open playground we call the Internet. But it is undeniably their /right/ - which is the only point I was making.

Conversely, you and I have the /right/ to control how we view those web pages. I use adblock, but will listen to a reasonable request to unblock ads. If a site uses evil ads (flash, java, java-script, animations) and tries to force me to view them, I tend to stop using the web site because a) it's no longer worth the aggravation of trying to circumvent - there is precious little content out there that I simply "must" have. b) if enough people do walk away, the provider has no choice but to reconsider his tactics.

But to reiterate my point - the content providers have the right to control what is on their web site. What we choose to do about it is up to us.

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Google analytics safe to use?

thePowerOfGrayskull thePowerOfGrayskull writes  |  more than 5 years ago

In the last few weeks, I've seen this error several times when I try to get to a slashdot article via RSS feed:

From what I've been able to see, when Google Analytics has an issue, it is actually preventing viewers from seeing the Slashdot site. I've been considering using it on a couple of my sites, but I have to say - this makes me nervous. Would I really be handing this much control over my readers' experience to Google if I started to use Analytics? Or is this 'feature' something that must specifically be enabled?

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