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Comments

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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

thejynxed Re:Not Enough (533 comments)

With the vast uptake of mobile devices, this is coming much sooner than most people realize. I have a 64 GB micro-SD card in my Galaxy, but I still find myself sending photos and whatnot to my Google Drive account on a regular basis just to make room for more (I take lots of pics with my phone - mainly work related, when I need quick snapshots of off-the-truck damaged merchandise or improperly shipped hazmats to send to corporate and to my LP supervisor).

My wife has it a bit easier - her Nikon camera sends her photos automatically back to her computer over cell service (or wifi if wifi is available). She's been pestering me to setup a Google Drive account for her so she can do the same with her LG Optimus - she only has a 16 GB micro SD card.

about three weeks ago
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California Tells Businesses: Stop Trying To Ban Consumer Reviews

thejynxed Re: Mecial Cannabis companies (275 comments)

You need remedial reading comprehension. It was a grocery store selling loss leaders as a part of sales for actual family grocery shoppers, not "We're selling loss leaders so this greedy-assed restaurant owner can come clean out all of the sale items for her restaurant." Which is what they said to begin with.

I'd have banned her and her family after the first time she tried sending one of her kids in, let alone more than one of them.

Hell, I work for a major corporation that sells things, and we have policies in place banning exactly this kind of thing from "customers". Extreme couponers are also another one who are banned by policy.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Old Technology Can't You Give Up?

thejynxed Re:For me... (635 comments)

It's a mixture of FTTN, coax, and regular "DSL type" POTS copper lines. The dirty secret of Uverse, is that it is really just a mish-mash of what was already present, with them "maybe" upgrading a few things here and there. This allows them to get away with charging people more than what they would for normal DSL, and also get away with the "up to" disclaimer nonsense for their speeds.

It's part of the reasons results for Uverse can vary even more widely within a same-service area than cell phone coverage.

about a month ago
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Comcast Tells Government That Its Data Caps Aren't Actually "Data Caps"

thejynxed Re:Its all a zero sum game (341 comments)

Except in PA, where Verizon is required by the Commonwealth to roll out and offer DSL even in the most rural of areas if enough of the neighbors get together and decide they want it.

Results vary in other States/Commonwealths, of course.

And of course, we also have Comcast and Time Warner, with Comcast having their headquarters in Philadelphia.

about a month ago
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Solid State Drives Break the 50 Cents Per GiB Barrier, OCZ ARC 100 Launched

thejynxed Re:Performance (183 comments)

I differ, in that I would make sure it had a top-rated and reliable power supply (Corsair or Seasonic) and a powerful GPU (currently the best price to power ratios are the 750 GTX Ti and the R9 270 series from everything I've been reading) before it had an SSD any day of the week.

Why? I've had SSDs bite the dust more than once, very early into their supposed life cycles at rates that should be an absolute embarrassment to the engineering teams at the manufacturers in question.

about a month and a half ago
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Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

thejynxed Re:Confusing position (514 comments)

They're illegal, but happen all of the time anyhow. It's only a matter of getting caught or not.

about 2 months ago
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A New Form of Online Tracking: Canvas Fingerprinting

thejynxed Re:Yet another reason to turn off Ecmascript (194 comments)

I found out from some local members of the Amish community that the reason they reject grid power is that it would put them in ongoing debt - which is very much against their religious beliefs. This is also partially why they reject the use of automobiles (some communities are more permissive and allow the hiring of vehicles to drive them long distances) - purchasing one can A) put you into debt which is against religious beliefs and B) goes against their beliefs of being good stewards of the earth (ongoing greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution).

They don't reject use of things like some modern power tools, etc for use in their outside work for the 'English', especially when it comes to roofing contracts, building RVs, sheds, furniture, etc.

What's interesting to note - the debate is still ongoing in Amish communities about solar power panels and if they will be formally allowed - on the one hand it will give them electricity and whatnot in a 'clean' manner in compliance with their beliefs, on the other, there is objection to some of the materials used in those devices and how those materials are resourced.

about 2 months ago
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Black Hat Presentation On Tor Cancelled, Developers Working on Bug Fix

thejynxed Re:What? (52 comments)

I remember reading about flaws, exploits, etc that broke Tor anonymous browsing/data transfer as far back as 2005 or so. Some of these issues are still there because they honestly can't be fixed without a complete overhaul of how the entire thing is coded and works. Instead they have fixed what they could, and coded in mitigations for the rest.

It goes without saying though, that Tor, like many other things online, is, was, and always will be vulnerable to MITM attacks.

about 2 months ago
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Gamestop's Ludicrous Idea: Require Preorders To Unlock Custom Game Content

thejynxed Re:Already Happened (86 comments)

What's apparently happening here (didn't RTFA) according to the summary, is that they are looking to have non-fluff, etc content added specifically to the Gamestop versions of titles - meaning an actual part of the game is exclusive for their version (imagine playing a version of The Witcher for instance, that was missing an entire chapter from your version because it wasn't the Gamestop one).

about 3 months ago
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Gamestop's Ludicrous Idea: Require Preorders To Unlock Custom Game Content

thejynxed Re:Already Happened (86 comments)

Yes, but as in all of the Elder Scrolls titles, you'd almost never hit all of the quests in the game even in 5 or 6 playthroughs (because funny things happen, like questgiver NPCs dying to randomly wandering monster spawns or overly zealous town guards), so those 16 quests were basically useless fluff.

about 3 months ago
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Windows 9 To Win Over Windows 7 Users, Disables Start Screen For Desktop

thejynxed Re:skin it (681 comments)

They tried that with Vista and pre-SP1 Win7. They had to nuke it because there was a serious vulnerability found in the stack that they couldn't fix, so they disabled the entire functionality for both OSes in a patch. Their "new solution" to this was Live Tiles, etc in Win8.

As for changing Aero, etc, you could do that too - although next to nobody wanted to pay the license fee to MS to create those things, so it lead to some developers creating ways to bypass the signing requirements.

about 3 months ago
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Code Spaces Hosting Shutting Down After Attacker Deletes All Data

thejynxed Re:No offsite backups? (387 comments)

In this day and age of ransoming extortionists, folding companies, and natural disasters, you better have the paranoid amount and never do fewer than 6 backups.

about 3 months ago
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Code Spaces Hosting Shutting Down After Attacker Deletes All Data

thejynxed Re:Could Amazon have handled it better? (387 comments)

They should have tracked down who was responsible, and had a baseball bat liberally applied to their kneecaps.

about 3 months ago
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Was Watch Dogs For PC Handicapped On Purpose?

thejynxed Re:No accounting for taste. (215 comments)

They capped total mouse frame movements to the 30 FPS of the console version. This is just lazy porting, again.

about 3 months ago
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Netflix Shutters Its Public API

thejynxed Re:hum (59 comments)

If Hulu is still providing their desktop app (and I think they may have a mobile one as well), I would suggest using that instead of their actual site - it runs on Air which funnily enough, runs worlds better than the actual browser Flash modules.

As for sorting - I agree, their current methods leaves much to be desired, as it seems their system only sorts by up to three "tags" applied by their employees, and many (I dare say most) of their movies are mis-tagged, at least for their streaming service. To be fair, Amazon isn't any better with their movie tagging.

about 3 months ago
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AT&T Says Customer Data Accessed To Unlock Smartphones

thejynxed Re:Not doing it right (65 comments)

Hell, it doesn't even stop government agencies OTHER than the IRS requiring you to use it on all kinds of forms and applications, either.

about 3 months ago
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AT&T Says Customer Data Accessed To Unlock Smartphones

thejynxed Re:Not doing it right (65 comments)

It's surprising they are even following the bare minimum. Back in the dinosaur era of the 90's, when I worked for them (briefly), they got around most of such laws with impunity simply by changing where they stored customer databases.

If there was anything I ever picked up from my time at AT&T, it was that they are masters of shady law avoidance practices.

about 3 months ago
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Popular Shuttered Torrent Site Demonoid Returns

thejynxed Re:Guys, it's totally not a honeypot! (80 comments)

I concur, and they used their moderator staff to actually take care of wrongly filed torrents as well. They didn't just take a back-burner approach when it came to keeping everything organized the way it should be.

Most torrent sites out there you'll find shit like lame-assed Pokemon torrents filed under Sci-Fi or other such stupidity.

about 4 months ago
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Patent Troll Ordered To Pay For the Costs of Fighting a Bad Patent

thejynxed Re:but (191 comments)

That is only true based on the local and state laws where you may happen to be. Where I am for instance, it doesn't matter if you're doing a complete rebuild of a property that already has hookups, all permits are treated as "new builds" for the purposes of connecting to sewer, water, electricity &/or natural gas.

about 4 months ago

Submissions

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Author David Eddings Has Passed Away, Age 77

thejynxed thejynxed writes  |  more than 5 years ago

thejynxed writes "From the source article:

Eddings was famously old-fashioned, never using a typewriter or computer (he wrote out his scripts in long-hand) and was well-known for being self-effacing, once remarking, "I'm never going to be in danger of getting a Nobel Prize for literature."

From another article:

David Eddings, the acclaimed fantasy novelist and author of such series as The Belgariad and The Malloreon, has died at the age of 77. David Eddings was predeceased by his wife and writing partner Leigh two years ago.

It's a shame really, as The Belgariad is one of the better series out there, IMHO. I spent many hours of class time during my junior and high school years reading his novels."
Link to Original Source

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US Patent Office decimates Amazon's 1-Click Patent

thejynxed thejynxed writes  |  more than 6 years ago

thejynxed (831517) writes "The USPTO has finally come to a decision and made an Amazon 1-Click Patent Ruling.

From the article:

Most of the claims in Amazon's controversial patent for shopping with a single mouse click have been rejected by the US Patent Office. It follows a campaign by a New Zealander who filed evidence of prior art with funding from readers of his blog. There are 26 claims in Amazon.com's patent for Method and system for placing a purchase order via a communications network, better known as its 1-Click patent. Only five of the claims — numbered six to 10 — have been deemed "patentable and/or confirmed". Twenty-one others were rejected. Peter Calveley from Auckland has previously told OUT-LAW that he has no business interest in revoking Amazon's most famous asset of intellectual property. He worked as a motion capture performer and appeared as part of the evil armies in Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy before he began his Amazon.com campaign over 18 months ago. He said at the time that it was a simply a hobby borne of an interest in patents and a frustration with an order for a book from Amazon that took too long to arrive. Amazon applied for its famous patent in September 1997, naming founder and CEO Jeff Bezos as one of three inventors.
What's really funny, is that one of the patents used as prior art belongs to...Jeff Bezos. A patent filed by him and granted in 1995 was found to nullify one of the claims in Amazon's 1-Click Patent. You would think he would have known this or at least sub-licensed his personal patent to his company..."

Link to Original Source
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Japanese firm tests brain-controlled toys

thejynxed thejynxed writes  |  more than 7 years ago

thejynxed (831517) writes "From the article:

HATOYAMA, Japan (AP) — Forget the clicker: A new technology in Japan could let you control electronic devices without lifting a finger simply by reading brain activity. The "brain-machine interface" developed by Hitachi analyzes slight changes in the brain's blood flow and translates brain motion into electric signals. A cap connects by optical fibers to a mapping device, which links, in turn, to a toy train set via a control computer and motor during one recent demonstration at Hitachi's Advanced Research Laboratory in Hatoyama, just outside Tokyo. "Take a deep breath and relax," said Kei Utsugi, a researcher, while demonstrating the device on Wednesday. At his prompting, a reporter did simple calculations in her head, and the train sprang forward — apparently indicating activity in the brain's frontal cortex, which handles problem solving. Activating that region of the brain — by doing sums or singing a song — is what makes the train run, according to Utsugi. When one stops the calculations, the train stops, too. Underlying Hitachi's brain-machine interface is a technology called optical topography, which sends a small amount of infrared light through the brain's surface to map out changes in blood flow. Although brain-machine interface technology has traditionally focused on medical uses, makers like Hitachi and Japanese automaker Honda Motor have been racing to refine the technology for commercial application. Hitachi's scientists are set to develop a brain TV remote controller letting users turn a TV on and off or switch channels by only thinking. Honda, whose interface monitors the brain with an MRI machine like those used in hospitals, is keen to apply the interface to intelligent, next-generation automobiles.
"

Link to Original Source
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thejynxed thejynxed writes  |  more than 7 years ago

thejynxed (831517) writes "http://www.cnn.com/2007/EDUCATION/04/26/mit.dean.a p/index.html?eref=rss_latest

To stressed-out parents and students, MIT admissions dean Marilee Jones was a rare voice of reason in the high-pressure world of college admissions. With colleges demanding kids who play sports, run student government and take the heaviest course load they can, Jones shouted back the opposite: daydream, stay healthy, and don't worry so much about building a resume just to impress an elite college. Yet it turns out that Jones was susceptible to pressure herself. She falsely bolstered her credentials to get a job with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and over the course of her career claimed to have earned degrees from three schools. MIT officials say now they have no evidence she ever graduated from college at all. The school announced Thursday that Jones had resigned after acknowledging she had misrepresented her education when she started working at the university 28 years ago, and declined to correct multiple incorrect claims since then. A senior MIT official said that by claiming degrees she had never earned, Jones could no longer lead an admissions office that occasionally rescinds the acceptance letters sent to applicants who are untruthful about their own accomplishments. "We have to uphold the integrity of the institution, because that's what we've been trying to sell and she's our chief spokesperson on that," MIT Chancellor Phil Clay said. It's "regrettable, ironic, sad, but that's where we are."
A poseur is still a poseur. She lied on her resume, and continued to lie, and didn't bother fixing her lie. Now she got caught out, and is gone. Kudos to MIT for finally fixing their error, but I have to ask: "What took them so long to confirm the credentials of a Dean?" Is it normal for corporations and schools to screw up this badly, especially in a day and age when confirming you are who you say you are is rather important? (28 years??? Yeesh)"
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thejynxed thejynxed writes  |  more than 7 years ago

thejynxed (831517) writes "http://www.cnn.com/2007/BUSINESS/04/26/microsoft.p rofits.reut/index.html?eref=rss_latest

Microsoft posted a 65 percent rise in quarterly profit Thursday, topping Wall Street estimates due to better-than-expected demand for its new Windows Vista operating system. Shares of Microsoft rose 5 percent after the announcement, in which the world's biggest software company also forecast 2008 profit at the mid-point of a range of analyst estimates. "The strength of Vista is really driving this," said Kim Caughey, analyst at Fort Pitt Capital Group. She added that the company had set "manageable expectations for the full year 2008, which generally allows them some headroom." Microsoft posted a net profit of $4.93 billion, or 50 cents per diluted share, in its fiscal third quarter ended March 31 versus a profit of $2.98 billion, or 29 cents per share, in the year-ago period. Excluding tax benefits and a legal charge, Microsoft earned 49 cents per share, beating the average analyst forecast of 46 cents, according to Reuters Estimates. Revenue rose 32 percent to $14.4 billion. Analysts, on average, had forecast revenue of $13.89 billion, with estimates ranging from $13.73 billion to $14.09 billion, according to Reuters Estimates. Microsoft deferred about $1.7 billion in revenue from its second quarter to its third quarter to account for upgrade coupons given to customers prior to the January launch of Vista and Office 2007. Microsoft expects the latest versions of its two flagship products to underpin profit growth over the next few years. Those two product lines alone account for more than half of Microsoft's total revenue and a majority of its profits. Chief Financial Officer Chris Liddell said consumer sales of Vista surpassed the company's own expectations by $300 million to $400 million. "There is very good acceptance from a launch perspective for the product. It's early days, but we're encouraged by it," Liddell said in an interview with Reuters.
Now, is it just me, or are they seriously counting OEM installs as "consumer sales"? I would have thought they had enough sense to know and say the difference between selling a copy to Dell or HP and selling a copy directly to the consumer. Especially since they all pay at different price points. I am starting to think they just pull these numbers out of their asses and everyone on Wall Street falls for it. Still, this is the largest gain that MS has posted in quite awhile. Should make the shareholders happier."
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thejynxed thejynxed writes  |  more than 7 years ago

thejynxed (831517) writes "http://www.cnn.com/2007/SHOWBIZ/books/04/12/obit.v onnegut.ap/index.html Kurt Vonnegut, the satirical novelist who captured the absurdity of war and questioned the advances of science in darkly humorous works such as "Slaughterhouse-Five" and "Cat's Cradle," died Wednesday. He was 84. Vonnegut, who often marveled that he had lived so long despite his lifelong smoking habit, had suffered brain injuries after a fall at his Manhattan home weeks ago, said his wife, photographer Jill Krementz. The author of at least 19 novels, many of them best-sellers, as well as dozens of short stories, essays and plays, Vonnegut relished the role of a social critic. He lectured regularly, exhorting audiences to think for themselves and delighting in barbed commentary against the institutions he felt were dehumanizing people. "I will say anything to be funny, often in the most horrible situations," Vonnegut, whose watery, heavy-lidded eyes and unruly hair made him seem to be in existential pain, once told a gathering of psychiatrists. A self-described religious skeptic and freethinking humanist, Vonnegut used protagonists such as Billy Pilgrim and Eliot Rosewater as transparent vehicles for his points of view. He also filled his novels with satirical commentary and even drawings that were only loosely connected to the plot. In "Slaughterhouse-Five," he drew a headstone with the epitaph: "Everything was beautiful, and nothing hurt.""
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thejynxed thejynxed writes  |  more than 7 years ago

thejynxed (831517) writes "Nvidia has announced that they are purchasing PortalPlayer, Inc. one of the main designers of microchips for the iPod and other music players for $357 million USD. From the article on CNN.com:
Analysts said the acquisition reflects growing consumer demand for video-capable digital music players and the increasingly competitive and lucrative market for supplying the chips to power those devices. Santa Clara-based Nvidia said it would pay $13.50 in cash for each outstanding share of San Jose-based PortalPlayer, a 1 percent premium over PortalPlayer's closing price Friday. Nvidia said the deal has been approved by the boards of both companies. Nvidia's stock rose 3 percent to close Monday at $33.59, while PortalPlayer's shares were down a penny to close at $13.35, both on the Nasdaq. "Modern mobile devices are miniaturized yet powerful multimedia computers," Jen-Hsun Huang, Nvidia's chief executive officer, said in a statement. "With the products created through this combination, we intend to drive the next digital revolution, where the mobile device becomes our most personal computer." PortalPlayer is best known for providing chips that power Apple Computer Inc.'s wildly popular iPod digital music players. But the company suffered a major setback earlier this year when Apple chose to use Samsung Electronics Co. chips instead of PortalPlayer's for the flash memory-based iPod Nano line, and PortalPlayer's stock price plummeted. However, PortalPlayer's technology was included in recent versions of Apple's video iPods, and analysts said the relationship with Apple and other mobile device makers made PortalPlayer a lucrative target for Nvidia, which is accelerating its push into portable music players and other handheld devices.
You can read the full article here: http://www.cnn.com/2006/BUSINESS/11/06/nvidia.deal .ap/index.html"

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