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Comments

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Watch Ben Heck Hack a 360 and a Sega CDX

thetinytoon Old News (28 comments)

There's a hellotamore on the revision3-page - unfortunatly without the illustrator-source-files.

more than 3 years ago
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German Telekom offers Fiber-To-The-Home

thetinytoon Re:First link is broken - n/t (3 comments)

which first link? The original story link works, but is in german only (sorry, did not find an english source then).

more than 3 years ago
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Distinguishing Encrypted Data From Random Data?

thetinytoon Re:Plausible Deniability - TrueCrypt (467 comments)

Sure thing, but the "okay, I give you the password, but don't tell my gf about all the porn on there"-story is way more believable than the "some guy put an encrypted 200gb file on my laptop without me noticing".

more than 4 years ago
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Distinguishing Encrypted Data From Random Data?

thetinytoon Plausible Deniability - TrueCrypt (467 comments)

what you want is plausible deniability and that is not easy to achieve, as some states have started to have laws allowing to hold you hostage if you do not provide an decryption key to an encrypted container (which, with your method, would be corrupted). Have a look as TrueCrypts technical details behind their plausible deniability feature: http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/?s=plausible-deniability

more than 4 years ago
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Learning and Maintaining a Large Inherited Codebase?

thetinytoon codelines/h from BMW (532 comments)

Already stated, but my 2 cents: - use a good IDE with fast referencing possibility (e.g. right-click on a function call => "follow") - use a profiler to see a flowchart or UML for a high level overview - start commenting the classes and refactor their names if unclear. There are nice tools out there (depending on the language), which create DocBlocks for everything first and then you can use DoxyGen to generate a nice overview over everything. And about the question of how bad you are: one of my IT lecturers had worked at BMW and they had made a test on the efficiency of their programmers on new code and on code written by other developers. When the same developer had to extend or change code of other developers, he was a hundred times slower than when he would code on his own himself. That was around 2001, if I'm not mistaken.

more than 4 years ago
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Maintaining algorithmic secrecy

thetinytoon please don't mess with what you don't understand (4 comments)

Either I don't get your question right or you have no idea about the basic principles of cryptography. One of those is that the security of an algorithm lies in the key alone. Every algorithm needs to be open to the public to be evaluated. Making your own modifications to an (already insecure) algorithm for "security reasons" will most likely result in a *weaker* algorithm than it was before. If you want to secure this messages, public/private-key cryptography is your way to go. But honestly, I'm very sure that your system will definetly not meet any necessary standards for any election whatsoever.

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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Ask Slashdot: Android and Google Alternatives?

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 2 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "I have been using Google Calendar and Google Mail with my Android phone for a few years now, but with the upcoming new "feature" of Google to combine all information of any of their products to enable advertisers to profile me, I'm trying to find alternatives, preferably able to run on my own server. I do need Mail, Contact and Calendar Sync with my Android and my business Exchange account, and also a nice interface with a good search function (as I use this function by far the most). Any suggestions where to turn, now Google starts to shatter their "Do no evil"-rule?"
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Police raids German Pirate Party's servers

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 3 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "The servers of the german pirate party have been raided and taken offline by the german police, after the french police asked the german officials for help in a lawcase. According to a police' spokesman, the case is not targeting the Pirate Party itself and that they cannot disclose any further details at this time.

Interesting bit is: If the german Pirate Party itself or a member of the party is not the target of the investigation, why did the police take down a complete democratic party's infrastructure?

Hashtag for followers of the events is already there: #servergate."

Link to Original Source
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German Telekom offers Fiber-To-The-Home

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 3 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "The german telecommunications provider Telekom has officially announced the availability of Fiber-To-The-Home (FTTH) in ten german cities, starting with a bandwidth of 100mbit down and 50mbit upstream for 65 bucks. A double in speed is available for 5 bucks more per month. "Technologically", a Telekom-spokesmen added, "we are able to bring about 1gbit down- and 0,5gbit upstream right to your home. The current limitation is due to the mass-market and not a technological decision".

This is a huge leap forward in terms of bandwidth for home users — the implications for the possible use-cases and the market in general are unseen so far."

Link to Original Source
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Update on Paypal's rejection of WikiLeaks

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 3 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "Just to be clear: Paypal did not deactivate an account of Wikileaks, but of the german Wau Holland Foundation. Wau Holland was a german hacker and journalist and one of the founders of the largest german hacker community, the Chaos Computer Club. After his death in 2001, family and friends of Wau founded the Wau Holland Foundation to preserve his ideals and attitudes by broadening the knowledge and fun in (information) technology.

Although no clear statement has been released so far, the foundation did provide monetary help to WikiLeaks, among other projects. Suspending the account of the foundation for a loose link to WikiLeaks is a really bold step for PayPal. There are still other methods to support WikiLeaks. Hopefully, the online support button will be back soon. Hey Peter, how about PayPal-functionality in Flattr?"
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EMI Music distributed "illegal music" themselves

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 3 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "In a legal battle between EMI Music and MP3tunes over illegal distribution of copyright music, the owner of MP3tunes Michael Robertson was able to get hold of secret emails from EMI Music, in which representatives of the group admitted to have used the well known file sharing company Rapidshare to distribute copyrighted material as virual marketing. The legal problems of a company distributing their music over file sharing sites and then suing people for using these downloads should be clear. Anyone here who was sued by EMI and would like to revive their cases — now is your chance."
Link to Original Source
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Google sued for Picture Search in Germany

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 4 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "Google's been sued (again) for it's picture search in germany. An artist does not want it's pictures to be shown on Googles result page and to have her pictures saved on servers in the US, arguing that as she has the copyright on her pictures, Google should have had to ask for permission first.

Although this could be correct under german law, the case could be more interesting than it seems. By publishing a picture (or anything that validates as "art" under german law) on your homepage and not denying search bots to crawl your page with a robots.txt or a metatag, do you implicitly allow your page to be indexed (opt-out) or do search providers only have permission if a robots.txt explicitly allows indexing (opt-in)? In the latter case, this would have dramatic effects on search results in germany.

On a side note, the timing for this lawsuit is just right. Google's been under fire in germany for Google Street View and Google News in the past months already and the privacy ministers of different federal states are currently discussing ways to constraint Google's hunger for data."

Link to Original Source
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Constitutional complaint on employee spy law

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 4 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "The german ELENA-law has been passed the legislative process in 2009 and forces employers to send a monthly report to a central database about their employees, starting this month. This report does not only include name, address and salary records, but also information on participation in strikes, legal lockouts, sick days, general misbehavior, disciplinary actions and other sensitive information, giving employers lots of different ways to force his employees to abandon legal actions against them. On top of that, employees currently have no way to get information on the saved data (although this possibility has to be given according to german law), because the central database is "technically not ready" for that and expects to be in late 2012.

As a consequence on the latest decision of the german high court on the data retention law, a constitutional complaint has been started, on which every german employee may take part in. Unfortunatly, the time is short, since the deadline for this complaint ends on March 31st. So if you are affected, start signing immediatly."

Link to Original Source
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German high court strikes data retention law

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 4 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "German High Court has striked down the german data retention law as unconstitutional in great parts, but did not rule against the law in whole.
In its ruling, the court said the law failed to sufficiently balance the need for personal privacy against that for providing security, although it did not rule out data retention in principle.
"The disputed instructions neither provided a sufficient level of data security, nor sufficiently limited the possible uses of the data," the court said.

The complaint against the law was signed by more than 35.000 persons and is the biggest complaint ever handled by the High Court in german history."

Link to Original Source
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Password management in distributed networks

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 4 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "As many of the readers, I'm one admin in a team running a network of servers, switches and client computers, with each and every system having some username and password to access the administrative interfaces. For obvious reasons, you don't want to have one combination for them all, but for still being productive, you don't want to look up some obscure 16-digit password in a secure container anytime you need to do something. Password generation rules are mostly so obvious, that you could use one password anyways, and most hardware devices don't allow the use of Challenge/Response-algorithms like OPIE. So I'm asking: how do you solve this dilemma in your networks?"
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German president refuses to sign censorship law

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 4 years ago

thetinytoon (827176) writes "German federal president Horst Köhler has refused to sign the censorship treaty that passed parlament earlier this year, stating that he 'needs more information'. In germany, the federal president has the right to reject a law only by reasons of an unlawful realisation in the legislative process, but not for reasons of being unconstitutional (as long as it's not obviously against the constitution).

Political observers guess, that the political parties would like to get rid of the law without loosing face, but since it already passed the parlament, they can't simply abandon it. Politics — everyone knows what needs to be done, but no one wants to admit he was wrong in the first place.

Source (google translation): http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&tl=en&u=http://www.golem.de/0911/71529.html
Original story (german): http://www.golem.de/0911/71529.html"

Journals

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Kerry in the oval office if non-US-citizens are asked

thetinytoon thetinytoon writes  |  more than 9 years ago During the last few weeks, non-american have been able to give a http://www.globalvote2004.org/symbolic vote to their favorite of the US-election taking place tomorrow. The results are online today and show 77% for Kerry. Let's see who's getting on the chair...

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