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Comments

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Bitcoin Hits New All-time High of $32

this great guy Re:Why anyone would think this is a good thing (339 comments)

Right. But my point is that if spending is shown to increase globally (which it is), we can infer that the remaining volume of bitcoins that are hoarded is diminishing (volume = number of bitcoins multiplied by frequency of transactions). Also, you need to realize that the ultimate goal of hoarders is to sell at some point in the future, in order to realize a profit. Therefore there is always going to be some amount of bitcoins available for purchase if the exchange rate continues to climb. See http://bitcoincharts.com/markets/mtgoxUSD_depth.html : the sell orders smoothly cover a price from $30 or so up to trillion of dollars. Therefore "lack of liquidity" is never going to be an issue - the exchange rate is just going to climb and entice some hoarders to sell.

about a year and a half ago
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Bitcoin Hits New All-time High of $32

this great guy Re:Why anyone would think this is a good thing (339 comments)

Of course they're being hoarded.

On the contrary, all the economic indicators point to the fact that, globally, Bitcoin spending is increasing: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=5296889 Perhaps people are uncertain about Bitcoin's future, or are plainly irrational, hence they still spend bitcoins despite knowing about deflation.

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Undoing an Internet Smear Campaign?

this great guy Marry her - Change her name :) (338 comments)

Marry her. She changes both her official last name, and her pen name. And bam! the guy has to re-buy new domains matching the new name, and has to re-do the smear campaign from scratch :) And preferably, before she changes her name, pre-emptively buy domains before the ex-husband does.

about a year and a half ago
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Bitcoin Mining Reward About To Halve

this great guy Re:Who cares, the mining game is over anyways. (600 comments)

Multiple errors in your post.

The Bitcoin difficulty has never been bumped up by ASICs, because ASICs have not yet been released. They should come out in December/January.

Mining is still profitable today. I am still making money with GPUs (a little), and with FPGAs (a lot). Even after the halving due tomorrow, my GPUs will still make money. It is all about electrical costs. If you pay less than $0.20/kWh, a HD 7970 can still make money. Worldwide average is $0.10/kWh.

ASICs are not expensive at all. The most power efficient ASIC vendor, Butterfly Labs, have ASICs starting at $149: http://www.butterflylabs.com/products/

about a year and a half ago
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With Euro Zone Problems, Bitcoin Experiencing Boost In Legitimacy

this great guy Re:Governments can't inflate the currency (430 comments)

This still means the 9M coins will trade in about 7-8 months. Or 3-4 months rather, since the MtGox volume has recently increased to 80k coins per day.

more than 2 years ago
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With Euro Zone Problems, Bitcoin Experiencing Boost In Legitimacy

this great guy Re:So why is that? (430 comments)

It is because people *think* they can profit more by day trading the coins, as opposed to merely hoarding them.

more than 2 years ago
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With Euro Zone Problems, Bitcoin Experiencing Boost In Legitimacy

this great guy Re:Governments can't inflate the currency (430 comments)

Did you read the part where I said 40k is SIX TIMES the number of coins introduced daily? This is not "irrelevant noise". 40k per day also means the entire market (9M coins) is traded every 7.5 months.

more than 2 years ago
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With Euro Zone Problems, Bitcoin Experiencing Boost In Legitimacy

this great guy Re:Governments can't inflate the currency (430 comments)

You are wrong. The "hoarding" argument has been beaten to death. Current evidence shows that people are NOT hoarding the coins: every day, 40 thousand coins change hands on the single largest exchange: http://bitcoincharts.com/markets/mtgoxUSD.html This is six times the number of coins created daily by the network (7 thousand).

In other words, people are not hoarding them, but are trading them very, very frequently.

And this is just measuring MtGox's volume. Other trades (merchant sales, other exchanges, etc) are likely doing even bigger volume...

more than 2 years ago
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Bitcoin Mining Startup Gets $500k In Venture Capital

this great guy Re:You're kidding me??!?! (381 comments)

Governments tend not to like their citizens taking part in transactions that don't have a paper trail.

You mean like... cash?

more than 2 years ago
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Can NASA Warm Cold Fusion?

this great guy Re:now called 'low-energy nuclear reactions' (556 comments)

Believe it or not, I am willing to bet $5k that Ni-H cold fusion is real! We can use longbets.org Contact me at this.guy.from.slashdot@gmail.com

more than 2 years ago
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Can NASA Warm Cold Fusion?

this great guy Re:now called 'low-energy nuclear reactions' (556 comments)

I give up. I gave you links from multiple independent research groups who show something needs explaining but you keep ignoring them... Read again from Thermacore, the CERN, Piantelli, Focardi, the Italian ENEA (equivalent to the US Dept of Energy). All are linked from http://blog.zorinaq.com/?e=61 You have to read the research papers yourself and then make up your own mind.

more than 2 years ago
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Can NASA Warm Cold Fusion?

this great guy Re:now called 'low-energy nuclear reactions' (556 comments)

Give me a break, "ecatnews" just happened to have the best quote from this NASA engineer. His quote remains nonetheless correct.

Come back with some quality studies published in reputable journals and reproduced by numerous credible scientists, and we'll talk.

You do realize it is impossible to reach this situation if everyone had your mindset... You have to have people "crazy enough" to remotely believe in the possibility of LENR to study it and eventually prove it or disprove it. Your behavior is exactly what has been holding back LENR research for 20 years. Instead of bluntly rejecting it, you should be open-minded and support the current research, even if you currently don't believe in it.

For the record the Focardi report was published in a peer-reviewed journal (Il Nuovo Cimento).

Thermacore (DARPA contractor) reported anomalous heat in Ni-H cells: http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/GernertNnascenthyd.pdf

Very recently at the WSEC 2012 conference, Celani also reported excess heat: http://www.22passi.it/downloads/WSEC2012%20Present.pdf

So, technically speaking, I agree with you, no one can unambiguously prove LENR today. I am just pointing out research and experiments that indicate there are datapoints that current theories cannot explain, and that we may be at the verge of finally proving LENR.

more than 2 years ago
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Can NASA Warm Cold Fusion?

this great guy Re:now called 'low-energy nuclear reactions' (556 comments)

You really ought to read my blog post. It is not biased because it merely quotes and links to other trusted external resources (such as NASA) referencing similar successful experiments.

The single experiment I quoted (900 extra MJ) was run over 278 days. That corresponds to 37W of heat produced continuously, in addition to the heat produced by the input power which varied from 149.6W to 94.3W. All this info is in the PDF I linked to.

Even today, the NASA scientist interviewed in the video referenced by TFA re-stated that "production of excess energy has been demonstrated": http://ecatnews.com/?p=1868

It is time to stop saying "I won't believe in it until it has been reproduced". It HAS been demonstrated/reproduced. We can't explain the phenomenon. So it is time to pour research effort into LENR...

more than 2 years ago
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Can NASA Warm Cold Fusion?

this great guy ONE post that might convince you Rossi is for real (556 comments)

http://blog.zorinaq.com/?e=61

This covers 20 years of research of "anomalous heat" coming from nickel-hydrogen cells which is the basis of Rossi's technology. Did you that numerous prominent Italian scientists believe Rossi is onto something? Did you know that a former Greek ambassador to Italy and scientist became involved with Rossi to manufacture the E-Cat via an independent company (Defkalion)? And now this company claims to have reverse engineered Rossi's device, and is on a race to ship something before Rossi?

I have been following very closely the whole story around Rossi's E-Cat device for 3 months, and it is so much more complex and fascinating than what you all think...

more than 2 years ago
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Can NASA Warm Cold Fusion?

this great guy Re:now called “low-energy nuclear reactions& (556 comments)

You are wrong. The anomalous heat detected in some experiments is statistically significant. Just one example: in a 1998 experiment, Focardi had set up a cell that ran continuously for 278 days and produced an excess power of about 900 megajoule: http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/FocardiSlargeexces.pdf

The problem is that this experiment, and many others, despite providing very interesting results, have been mostly ignored by the scientific community purely because of the stigma associated to Cold Fusion research. This is frustrating!

The submitter is also incorrect when saying that Rossi provided no details about how his reactors work. He explained that (a) he processes the nickel powder to create tubercles and enhance its contact surface with hydrogen, (b) he uses 2 nickel isotopes to enhance the reaction, (c) he splits molecular hydrogen (H2) into atomic hydrogen (H1), (d) he uses high pressure and temperature to initiates the reaction, etc.

I used to think that Rossi's E-Cat was a scam, but after researching deeply the subject, I am now convinced this guy might be onto something, see this post I wrote explaining many Cold Fusion experiments that seem to support Rossi and that have been ignored by the community at large: http://blog.zorinaq.com/?e=61

more than 2 years ago
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Costly SSDs Worth It, Users Say

this great guy Why is the NetApp Flash Cache so pricey? (288 comments)

On "why does NetApp sell their PCIe NAND flash card $30k?", here is your answer, Chris Rima: http://blog.zorinaq.com/?e=37

In a 3 words: because NetApp can.

It's not the components or engineering behind the card that cost $30k. NetApp prices it so high because the card boosts the performance of their filers by about the same amount as a ~$50k shelf of SAS disks (click that link and go read NetApp's own marketing documentation). They have got to have price points that make sense to customers.

(I know a fraction of you will think "No way!". Well, arbitrary price markups on enterprise gear do exist. This NetApp Flash Cache is effectively priced $150/GB. How do you think that certain competitors can even sell _enterprise_ flash at well below $10/GB? We are not talking 25 or 50% less, but a whole order of magnitude less expensive!)

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Company Announces 65nm Bitcoin Mining Chip

this great guy this great guy writes  |  about 2 years ago

this great guy writes "A private company announced a full custom 65nm ASIC for mining bitcoins. They claim that consumer devices based on the chip will start shipping to customers this December. The design costs are estimated at half a million dollars, and have reportedly been funded by external venture capital. We are witnessing the birth of a specialized Bitcoin mining industry."
Link to Original Source
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Breaking UNIX crypt() on the PlayStation 3

this great guy this great guy writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Marc Bevand writes "Last week at the ToorCon 10 hacker conference in San Diego, I presented Breaking UNIX crypt() on the PlayStation 3, a talk focused on optimizing the bruteforcing speed of DES-based crypt() password hashes for the Cell B.E. processor by implementing a technique known as bitslicing. I am glad to announce that source code has just been released and this implementation averages 45.5 gates per S-box. This is by no mean a replacement for a tool like John the Ripper (which supports many advanced features and other hashing algorithms), but nonetheless a comparison between the two is interesting. The PS3's 65nm 3.2 GHz Cell processor can test 11.5 million password/sec while consuming only 130W. This represents a performance/dollar result 4.4x better than John the Ripper on a quad-core 3.2 GHz QX9770, or 1.6x better than a 2.66GHz Q6700; a performance/Watt ratio 1.5x better than both; and an absolute cracking speed respectively 8% and 30% faster."
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IAEA Cracks Nuclear Ring's Hard Drive Encryption

this great guy this great guy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

this great guy (922511) writes "A NY Times article about the nuclear smuggling network ran by Abdul Qadeer Khan reveals: 'It was not until 2005 that officials of the I.A.E.A., which is based in Vienna, finally cracked the hard drives on the Khan computers recovered around the world. And as they sifted through files and images on the hard drives, investigators found tons of material [...]. In all, they found several terabytes of data, a huge amount to sift through.'. Given that Khan's revelations were made in early 2004, does that mean it took the IAEA 1-2 years to bruteforce the encryption ? Did they receive help from the NSA ?"
Link to Original Source

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