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Backblaze's 6 TB Hard Drive Face-Off

tibit Re:Man, am I old ... (159 comments)

Those aren't iPhone JPEGs, but ~20 Mpixel RAW files, and there are thousands of them each month - closer to 10k, really. These days it's really easy to generate vast numbers of pictures when you have a good camera. When she shoots kids, it's 10 shots per second, often until the buffer fills up after 50-60 shots. I'd say she takes on average 300 shots per day. It really doesn't take very long to have that many. If the camera was any faster, it'd have been more I'm afraid :)

yesterday
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Backblaze's 6 TB Hard Drive Face-Off

tibit Re:Man, am I old ... (159 comments)

My wife's photographs, taken recreationally only, can amount to a couple hundred GB per month. She does pare it down to 100GB or so sometime later. What's so "hard" to understand here? Our photo archive is almost 10TB at this point. Music - about 10GB. Family videos - 2TB or so.

yesterday
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The Joker Behind the Signetics 25120 Write-Only Memory Chip Hoax

tibit Re:Joke? They're real! (100 comments)

Not necessarily. Some modern color printers have built-in optical scanners used for color alignment. They certainly can read what they wrote on the image transfer belt. I have one like that.

2 days ago
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The Joker Behind the Signetics 25120 Write-Only Memory Chip Hoax

tibit Re:Joke? They're real! (100 comments)

You confuse EPROM, PROM and ROM. A mask-programmed ROM cannot be erased without destroying it. UV light will do nothing to a ROM. A PROM uses cells with electrically-destructible fuses or cells with stored electrical charge - it is electrically programmed, not mask-programmed. UV light will do nothing to a fuse-based PROM, but will erase the charge-based PROM. The charge-based PROMs are also called OTP EPROM (one time programmable, but not eraseable, so a misnomer). The addition of a quartz window turns a non-eraseable charge-based PROM into an EPROM, where E stands for eraseable. Finally, with addition of erase circuitry, an EPROM becomes an EEPROM where it can be electrically erased. Most EEPROMs can still be erased with UV light, if you were to access the bare die - although some EEPROMs shield the data-storing capacitors to protect the data from reverse-engineering/tampering. Such high-integrity parts won't erase in presence of UV, even if you de-encapsulated the chips.

2 days ago
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SpaceX Set To Create 300 New US Jobs and Expand Facilities

tibit Re:So... (43 comments)

Can confirm.

2 days ago
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SpaceX Set To Create 300 New US Jobs and Expand Facilities

tibit Re:So... (43 comments)

Between an H-1 nonimmigrant and a citizen there's a permanent resident...

3 days ago
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James Watson's Nobel Prize Medal Will Be Returned To Him

tibit Re:Watson is a scientist (234 comments)

Let's get over the "poor Rosie", shall we? It's just stupid. Go read the 1968 Double Helix. Nobody fucked her over. She died from an illness, and Watson himself acknowledges that she was a solid experimentalist. She was also an occasional bitch :)

about a week ago
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Using Discarded Laptop Batteries To Power Lights

tibit Most batteries have cell management done wrong (143 comments)

Unfortunately, most multi-cell batteries do cell management wrong and are unable to isolate dead cells. A typical "dead" battery has one bad cell, with other cells having more than another lifetime of reasonable performance ahead of them. Most laptop and power tool batteries will work completely satisfactorily if you merely break up the cells and apply proper cell and charge management that is able to extract charge from and impart charge to each cell independent of other cells.

Most "dead" batteries that people throw away are good - except for one cell.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can a Felon Work In IT?

tibit Re:America, land of the free... (717 comments)

only to see that employee steal 100 million from the bank

That'd be less than many a bank's top honchos stole from the customers in the 1st decade of this century, so I'd say game on.

about two weeks ago
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James Watson's Nobel Medal Sells For $4.1 Million

tibit Re:Here's an idea for him (201 comments)

the best known account of her, from a professional colleague says stuff like this

Well, if you insist on picking up such bits, then it's your problem. The book is available online and you can certainly see for yourself what Watson wrote. His account of Rosy is mostly factual. The fact is that she was as stubborn and hard to deal with as she was brilliant. Her work was recognized by Watson in spite of his objectified view of women. Again, I find no problem with such descriptions since they are factual if not very productive. If you don't like such facts, too bad.

The Double Helix was written I think shortly after Rosie had passed away, in the 1960's. That book gives her all the recognition that's called for, I think, and is, again, fairly factual as to what was going on. If people decide not to read a short, first-person account of how the structure of DNA was found, it's their own problem. Nobody's hiding Rosie's memory from anyone. People just decide to ignore it.

about two weeks ago
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James Watson's Nobel Medal Sells For $4.1 Million

tibit Re:Here's an idea for him (201 comments)

I think that the hullaballoo about Rosie Franklin is really getting out of hand. Fucking Watson himself wrote in The Double Helix:

In 1958, Rosalind Franklin died at the early age of thirty-seven. Since my initial impressions of her, both scientific and personal (as recorded in the early pages of this book), were often wrong, I want to say something here about her achievements. The X-ray work she did at King's is increasingly regarded as superb. The sorting out of the A and B forms, by itself, would have made her reputation; even better was her 1952 demonstration, using Patterson superposition methods, that the phosphate groups must be on the outside of the DNA molecule. Later, when she moved to Bemal's lab, she took up work on tobacco mosaic virus and quickly extended our qualitative ideas about helical construction into a precise quantitative picture, definitely establishing the essential helical parameters and locating the ribonucleic chain halfway out from the central axis.

Because I was then teaching in the States, I did not see her as often as did Francis, to whom she frequently came for advice or when she had done something very pretty, to be sure he agreed with her reasoning. By then all traces of our early bickering were forgotten, and we both came to appreciate greatly her personal honesty and generosity, realizing years too late the struggles that the intelligent woman faces to be accepted by a scientific world which often regards women as mere diversions from serious thinking. Rosalind's exemplary courage and integrity were apparent to all when, knowing she was mortally ill, she did not complain but continued working on a high level until a few weeks before her death.

Yes, he wrote it back in 1968. So lets just stop with the "poor forgotten Rosie". I mean Watson himself mentioned her often in his book, and wrote those paragraphs (amongs others) about her. Yes, she was right and she was a good experimentalist. Nobody forgot about her, expect idiots who don't read books. Double Helix is less than a 100 pages long, and is an easy read. How much simpler could it be to read about it all from a first-hand account? Anyone who has anything but the most passing interest in the history of determination of DNA's structure would have heard about her! It's in fact hard to miss her.

For everyone who doesn't know what's going on with R.F. these days: full-retard pseudo-feminists got a hold of her and are using her memory for their own devices. Fuck them.

about two weeks ago
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DOOM 3DO Source Released On Github

tibit Re:The fact remains... (323 comments)

> the depletion of eggs is the showstopper

That line is repeated over and over but it's IMHO very much misleading. There are hundreds of thousands of eggs available at the time the first period rolls over. It's not as if they just disappear at a ratio of roughly a thousand eggs lost per every ovulation. Nothing gets depleted, AFAIK. A woman simply doesn't ovulate as often, and eventually she doesn't ovulate at all. Plenty of eggs are still there, IIRC.

about two weeks ago
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Chinese CEO Says "Free" Is the Right Price For Mobile Software

tibit Re:Profit? (133 comments)

Nope. I merely want a free app to be, well, free. If it has paid-for content, then it's not free, duh. Let's not devalue the word.

about two weeks ago
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Chinese CEO Says "Free" Is the Right Price For Mobile Software

tibit Re:Profit? (133 comments)

The way it seems to work is this: The executable is free. The content is billed in $0.99 increments :)

about two weeks ago
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Montana Lawmakers Propose 85 Mph Speed Limit On Interstates

tibit Re:IL tollway needs to be 70 or more (525 comments)

I agree about Chicago. I drove there at 70mph, with everyone pretty much ignoring the 55mph speed limit. Heck, you'd be a major nuisance if you went at 55mph!

about two weeks ago
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Montana Lawmakers Propose 85 Mph Speed Limit On Interstates

tibit Re:German cars (525 comments)

That's true, but the differences are really negligible. What's not-quite-a-factor-of-two here? Not much. Only matters for actuarial tables. I would worry about order of magnitude differences.

about two weeks ago
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Montana Lawmakers Propose 85 Mph Speed Limit On Interstates

tibit Re:Federal Funding is not contingent on speed limi (525 comments)

I find it not only hard to believe, but it's bullshit to start with. Vehicles definitely won't get best MPG at 35mph, because the torque converter is not usually locked out at such speeds and the fuel economy is easily 5-10mpg worse than when you hit 45mph. Then, at 45mph your RPMs might well be a bit too low and maintaining any power output at such speed will happen in the most inefficient operating regime for the engine, unless the transmission downshifts. For most cars the sweet spot will be around 50-55mph I'd think.

about two weeks ago
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DOOM 3DO Source Released On Github

tibit Re:The fact remains... (323 comments)

Menopause is merely the state of a female having depleted their supply of eggs

/facepalm

Just stop.

about two weeks ago
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DOOM 3DO Source Released On Github

tibit Re:My hat is off to you, sir! (323 comments)

Shit, I'm still working with a legacy codebase that uses a linker like that. Heck, Zilog is still offering those linkers with their development systems.

about two weeks ago
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DOOM 3DO Source Released On Github

tibit Re:Cars got made (323 comments)

The bearings, ECUs, door hinges and brake discs can all be done in an under hour each, but I don't know how much a dealership will bill for each of them. Of course the diagnostic time must be accounted for as well. The window door motor can be anywhere between 15 minutes and a couple hours, depending on how much of a clusterfuck is the design (I shudder). Transmissions and steering columns can be quite drawn out. Never mind the price of the parts, of course.

IOW: OUCH.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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MRI Magnets Cause Nystagmus

tibit tibit writes  |  more than 3 years ago

tibit writes "In an interesting twist on "it's so old it's new again", Johns Hopkins researchers led by Dale Roberts found what must have been causing much confusion for doctors the world over: strong external magnetic field can stimulate the semicircular canals, causing vertigo and nystagmus (pendular eye motion). It's a textbook case of Lorentz force in action: our angular rate gyros, the semicircular canals in the middle ear, filled with endolymph, have a ionic current flowing across. In magnetic field, the current produces a force that pushes the lymph along the channel, causing stimulation of the cupula — a pressure sensor at the end of the channel. This is interpreted by the brain as rotation of head in space, and causes a nystagmus that's supposed to stabilize the image on the retina. Of course the subject is laying down and not spinning in space, and the mismatch between inertial measurements coming from the ear and real situation causes vertigo."
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