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Secret Service Critics Pounce After White House Breach

tinytim Nobody home (221 comments)

So, they don't guard it as strictly when the POTUS and family aren't home? I'm pretty OK with that.

about 2 months ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

tinytim Re:So-to-speak legal (418 comments)

They have evidence - the Tor usage.

It's not proof, and it's definitely not convincing evidence, but it's evidence to them.

To put it another way: if you're found not-guilty in court, the evidence is still called evidence.

about 2 months ago
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51% of Computer Users Share Passwords

tinytim Re:Logged in to email? (117 comments)

??? Have you tried pressing the "Emergency Call" text on the lock screen?

about 3 months ago
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TEPCO: Nearly All Nuclear Fuel Melted At Fukushima No. 3 Reactor

tinytim Re:I think this means (255 comments)

Firing simple rockets into the pressure vessels... with a hardened sensor package that was shielded enough to withstand the impact but yet exposed enough to measure the environment... with a radio that will work in the presence of massive amounts of ionizing radiation. Certainly we have enough unobtainium by this day and age.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Open Hardware/Software-Based Security Token?

tinytim OTP is where it's at. (113 comments)

FreeOTP and/or Google Authenticator may be exactly what you want from the client side.

I made a server-side implemention to get started with a little while ago:

https://github.com/adsllc/PHPO...

about 4 months ago
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The Major Theoretical Blunders That Held Back Progress In Modern Astronomy

tinytim This Just In (129 comments)

Is this author saying that when scientists have to prioritize limited personel, time, and money based on incomplete information they sometimes arrive at a suboptimal solution? Shameful.

They should probably wait until they know everything about what they'd like to study before they start studying it - that would really speed things up.

about 6 months ago
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RIM CEO On What Went Wrong

tinytim If he believes any of this, they are doomed. (299 comments)

> RIM is still a very innovative company. BlackBerry 10 will absolutely prove this.

Translation - we have been and are an innovative company, and let me point out this vaporware as my sole example of this.

I also like the part about their strong discipline with regard to product delays - on a product that's had numerous delays.

They were 10 years late to the touchscreen party, 5 years late to the functional web browser party, and they are still trying to show up to the UI party.

more than 2 years ago
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US Senator Proposes Bill To Eliminate Overtime For IT Workers

tinytim As far as I can tell, this is a non-story. (1167 comments)

It's more of a clarification, not a drastic change. For example, the $27.63 is already in current law! Things like "similarly skilled worker" are just spelled out with more examples.

Current law (as of Jan. 7, 2011), from http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode29/usc_sec_29_00000213----000-.html

(17) any employee who is a computer systems analyst, computer programmer, software engineer, or other similarly skilled worker, whose primary duty is—

        (A) the application of systems analysis techniques and procedures, including consulting with users, to determine hardware, software, or system functional specifications;
        (B) the design, development, documentation, analysis, creation, testing, or modification of computer systems or programs, including prototypes, based on and related to user or system design specifications;
        (C) the design, documentation, testing, creation, or modification of computer programs related to machine operating systems; or
        (D) a combination of duties described in subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) the performance of which requires the same level of skills, and

who, in the case of an employee who is compensated on an hourly basis, is compensated at a rate of not less than $27.63 an hour.

That really isn't very different from the Proposed bill, from story:

(17) any employee working in a computer or information technology occupation (including, but not limited to, work related to computers, information systems, components, networks, software, hardware, databases, security, internet, intranet, or websites) as an analyst, programmer, engineer, designer, developer, administrator, or other similarly skilled worker, whose primary duty is--

        (A) the application of systems, network or database analysis techniques and procedures, including consulting with users, to determine or modify hardware, software, network, database, or system functional specifications;
        (B) the design, development, documentation, analysis, creation, testing, securing, configuration, integration, debugging, modification of computer or information technology, or enabling continuity of systems and applications;
        (C) directing the work of individuals performing duties described in subparagraph (A) or (B), including training such individuals or leading teams performing such duties; or
        (D) a combination of duties described in subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C), the performance of which requires the same level of skill;

who is compensated at an hourly rate of not less than $27.63 an hour or who is paid on a salary basis at a salary level as set forth by the Department of Labor in part 541 of title 29, Code of Federal Regulations. An employee described in this paragraph shall be considered an employee in a professional capacity pursuant to paragraph (1).

more than 2 years ago
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Ban On Photographing Near Gulf Oil Booms

tinytim Re:minimum altitude (435 comments)

Um... you overlooked FAR 91.119a. You need to be able to land "safely" if the engine fails. This doesn't necessarily mean that you need to be able to glide to shore, but you do need to give yourself time to react. There's no set limit, but you should be able to justify your choice in a little room with a bright light.

more than 4 years ago
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How To Teach a 12-Year-Old To Program?

tinytim Re:javascript (799 comments)

+1 javascript

If you're not careful, you can learn a lot of bad habits in Javascript since it'll let you do some fairly messy stuff. This is more than made up for by the lack of a "compile" step, easy and pretty UI, etc. It's easy to do fun little projects with Javascript. Use it to set the hook, then branch into more "formal" languages. If he enjoys programming, he's going to learn Javascript eventually, so you might as well start out with it.

I can take an HTML/Javascript file with a interactive button and a text box and easily explain every line to most anybody. I can't think of a more important criteria.

more than 4 years ago
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Fossett's Plane Found

tinytim Re:Too early for amature guesses. (356 comments)

Flying Visual Rules into Instrument Conditions in mountainous terrain has my vote too - no engine failure required. In fact, an engine failure means he'd be gliding along the ridge - he would have hit wingtip first and cartwheeled, spraying debris.

I think it's fair to assume that a high altitude, high speed, perpendicular impact means he flew into a cloud that happened to have a mountain in the middle. Likely causes were human factors: complacency, feelings of invincibility, and bravado. It's possible the weather closed in around him unexpectedly and he had no choice, but that's pretty unlikely. More likely he got away with it 100 times before and his number was up.

Regardless of the type of instrumentation he had, he wasn't talking to ATC or doing the other stuff he should have been doing to be on instruments - it was an accident waiting to happen.

I wouldn't drive through fog in mountainous terrain at 90 MPH, flying through the same is no better.

Of course, I say that sitting safely in the Midwest with barely a hill within 100 miles. Still, I hope I never get that careless. JFK Jr. and Steve Fosset died doing it and I'm not sure that I'm any better than they were.

If you're not convinced, just head to ntsb.gov and read the fatal accident reports for a while.

more than 6 years ago

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