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Samsung Acknowledges and Fixes Bug On 840 EVO SSDs

toddestan Re:Classic Samsung... (101 comments)

Perhaps it is the subsequent "performance restoration" step, where the contents of the drive are re-written to make the data "new" as oposed to "old".?

That would be my guess. Before TRIM became a thing, some of the early drives would try to understand the file system to know what blocks weren't being used. Many of these drives only understood NTFS which is why they wouldn't perform as well in Linux (or if you ran Windows but turned on full disk encryption).

4 hours ago
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Battery Breakthrough: Researchers Claim 70% Charge In 2 Minutes, 20-Year Life

toddestan Re:You think electricity is expensive now? (395 comments)

The drop in gasoline tax revenue will logically lead to "car electricity" taxes... coming soon to a charging station near you.

They won't bother with taxing charging stations. What they want to do is put a GPS tracker in every car so they can track where the car is at all times... errr... I mean tax based upon where the car has been driven. They're been pushing for this already.

about two weeks ago
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Birth Control Pills Threaten Fish Stocks

toddestan Re:Birth control pills signifcant contributor? (147 comments)

This is why I don't drink tap water.

My tap water is pumped out of an aquifer where it has been for decades. This is of course, unsustainable in the long term, but in the meantime I'll take my chances with my tap water (which tastes great, by the way) instead of the bottled stuff.

about two weeks ago
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Liking Analog Meters Doesn't Make You a Luddite (Video)

toddestan Re:Claim is BS. (155 comments)

Up north it's not uncommon to see temperatures that low. I've never seen analog gauges in a car or truck act up at those temperatures. LCDs generally work, but the contrast can get screwy making them hard to read, and they update really slowly. LED and vacuum florescent displays are generally fine.

about two weeks ago
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Where Intel Processors Fail At Math (Again)

toddestan Re: Intel Common Core i7 (239 comments)

A couple notes: Numbers with 0 on the right without any decimal point (e.g. 10, 2500) create an ambiguity with sigfigs as to whether those zeros are significant or not. Some authors put a bar over the last significant figure to clarify, but many do not. In fact, one of the textbooks I used --- I believe it was for trig --- changed its practice in a later addition regarding whether those zeros are significant or not.

I've never heard of that. I've always just used scientific notation to remove any ambiguity. Sure, 1 x 10^1 or 1.0 x 10^1 is a bit more cumbersome than 10, but at least it's clear.

about two weeks ago
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CSS Proposed 20 Years Ago Today

toddestan Re:They _Should_ Replace It (180 comments)

To be fair, he only claimed it will readable. That doesn't mean we'd be using CSS 500 years from now, but that a computer 500 years now would be able to understand it.

about two weeks ago
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Ubisoft Claims CPU Specs a Limiting Factor In Assassin's Creed Unity On Consoles

toddestan Re:Hey Ubisoft, maybe you should stop shitting on (338 comments)

The jokes about Intel giveth, Microsoft taketh date back more than 10 years before the release of Vista. Besides, I used Vista on a Phenom II with 8GB of ram, and when you throw that kind of hardware at it, the performance was perfectly fine. I also ran it on an older P4 with 2GB of ram, and even then it wasn't horrible.

about two weeks ago
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Ubisoft Claims CPU Specs a Limiting Factor In Assassin's Creed Unity On Consoles

toddestan Re:clockspeed really? (338 comments)

There never was a 4GHz P4 released, so it's not clear how that's even in the database. Maybe it's some engineering sample, though as someone else pointed out it's half as fast as the 3.8 Ghz P4 (the fastest released Pentium 4) so my guess it's an error. In any case, I wouldn't use if for any meaningful comparisons. Also, you might want to note that the Core i7 has a turbo boost up to 3.3 Ghz and I would have to assume that's what it's really running at during any benchmark, so to call it a 1.7 Ghz CPU is misleading at best. It's also a dual core, so to compare it to single core is also bit unfair. Perhaps the closest comparison might be the Pentium D Extreme Edition which was two hyperthreading P4's in a single chip which would be the closest thing to the i7.
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare.php?cmp[]=1955&cmp[]=1130

You'll see that the i7 is now only about 4-5 times faster.

about two weeks ago
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Fuel Efficiency Numbers Overstate MPG More For Cars With Small Engines

toddestan Re:My favorite unit PSI (403 comments)

Considering that a pascal is a newton per square meter, it's the exact same concept, just with different units. Given that a square inch is a more useful measurement of area when dealing with something like a tire it's not hard to see how the PSI came about.

about two weeks ago
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2014 Nobel Prize In Physics Awarded To the Inventors of the Blue LED

toddestan Re:Worst physics nobel (243 comments)

My experience is that the lights are fine, but the cheap wall wart power supply is what is actually dead. My guess is that they tend to get a power supply that is rated just high enough to run the lamp, and unlike most things that use a wall wart the light is going to be drawing the full amount of power any time it is on. Find a working power supply at the right voltage (most use 5 or 12V which is luckily common) that preferably has a higher amperage rating and you can usually revive these lights.

about two weeks ago
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HP Is Planning To Split Into Two Separate Businesses, Sources Say

toddestan Re: Let me guess... (118 comments)

My understanding of trademarks though is that if the mark is not in use (and they haven't built a Packard in a very long time) then someone else can use the name.

about three weeks ago
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Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

toddestan Re: Here's the solution (577 comments)

I've never figured out that argument. Who, having experienced the crappiness that is iTunes on Windows, would want to buy a computer where the entire OS is created by the same company that made iTunes for Windows? I mean, it would be like running an OS created by the same people that wrote Java!

about three weeks ago
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Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

toddestan Re:OS Decay is largekly a myth. (577 comments)

Actually, I wouldn't call registry corruption a myth, as it was a very real problem back in the Windows 95 and Windows 98 days. I'm sure that's one of the reasons why the registry is robust as it is now is from the lessons Microsoft learned the hard way from earlier versions of Windows.

about three weeks ago
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Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

toddestan Re:Antecdotes != Evidence (577 comments)

Welcome to Windows prefetch. Basically, Windows will preload your programs and data that it thinks you might use into ram after you boot. The idea being that if the program is already cached when you try to launch it, then it will launch faster. The actual result seems to be lots of disk thrashing after boot, and the more ram you have the more Windows will thrash as Windows will prefetch until it's full. At least they toned it down a bit with Windows 7, as one of Vista's faults was that it was far too aggressive about prefetching.

about three weeks ago
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Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

toddestan Re:The bigger Problem is their "updates" (577 comments)

Windows XP definitely got slower as the patches and service packs piled up. The original release of Windows XP ran acceptably on a P3 with 256MB of ram, which was a pretty typical computer when XP debuted. By the end, it was a total dog on a P4 with 1GB of ram, which would have have been a high-end machine back in 2001.

about three weeks ago
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Which Cars Get the Most Traffic Tickets?

toddestan Re:Study is quite incomplete (261 comments)

It's the Mercury version of the Ford Tempo, which didn't make the top 20 at all. And I'd be willing to bet Ford sold a lot more Tempos than they did Topazs...

Probably the reason for that is all the Tempos were driven into the ground a long time ago by people who more or less considered them an appliance, whereas the Topazes were bought by older people who took a lot better care of them and drove them less. Now, the Tempos are gone, and these survivning Topazes have been passed on to their next (and probably last) owners, and are now being driven into the ground.

about three weeks ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

toddestan Re: Simple answer (942 comments)

0F if there is salt on it.

about three weeks ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

toddestan Re:FP? (942 comments)

I know that GM likes to rebrand automobiles and use different nameplates in the Canadian market, but a Pontiac Seville? That's a new one.

about three weeks ago
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Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

toddestan Re:This is aimed at carriers like Verizon Wireless (427 comments)

I find Bing to be really no worse than Google. But that's more of a matter of how far Google has fallen than anything about Bing.

about three weeks ago
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The Physics of Space Battles

toddestan Re:There Ain't No Stealth In Space (470 comments)

Actually, my guess is that most asteroids are pumping out far more energy in terms of reflected sunlight, which is of course how we detect them. A ship next to Earth is going to be bombarded with about 1.5kW of energy from the sun per square meter, which for any non-tiny ship would be a lot more than the 10,000 W or the ship might generate on its own. This presents a problem for the ship, as that energy has to go somewhere. Reflecting the light like a rock would stick out like a sore thumb, and the ship can't absorb the sunlight for very long either, as the energy has to go somewhere and the only option is to radiate it out into space (in the short term, the ship could absorb the energy and store it by doing something like heating water with it, but the ship could only play that game for so long). Probably the best solution would be to have a mirror that reflects the sunlight in a direction away from where you might think your enemy has any detectors.

about three weeks ago

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