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Comments

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Google Glass Is the Future — and the Future Has Awful Battery Life

torgis Re:Google glasses (473 comments)

Sounds like we need a Google Glass version of WorldStarHipHop to capture first-person violence on a low-res camera.

about a year ago
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Teen Suicide Tormentor Outed By Anonymous

torgis Re:It's all tied together (550 comments)

And Marilyn Manson. He's still a bad guy, right?

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Does Wireless Gear Degrade Over Time?

torgis Re:Signal isn't chaning, the noise floor is (615 comments)

2.4GHz can be done on your CPU.It might not make sense, but it makes sense.

It might not make sense, but it makes sense.

It might not make sense

Nope.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Does Wireless Gear Degrade Over Time?

torgis Re:The Hamsters get tired (615 comments)

How do you get the solder to adhere so well to fur? I've always had trouble with that.

about 2 years ago
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Facebook and Wal-Mart Join Forces

torgis Seems legit (127 comments)

It's almost as if they were intentionally trying to create the biggest, most evil company ever known to man.

more than 2 years ago
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FBI Tries To Force Google To Unlock User's Android Phone

torgis pipewrench decryption algorithm (385 comments)

They could always use the cheap, efficient pipewrench decryption algorithm. Works every time.

more than 2 years ago
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Pink Floyd Engineer Alan Parsons Rips Audiophiles, YouTube and Jonas Brothers

torgis Re:Audiophiles (468 comments)

Um, it says "speaker"...

Yes, so it does. I still stand by my weasel comment though.

more than 2 years ago
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Canada's Massive Public Traffic Surveillance System

torgis Coming soon... (239 comments)

Coming soon to an America near you!

more than 2 years ago
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Pink Floyd Engineer Alan Parsons Rips Audiophiles, YouTube and Jonas Brothers

torgis Re:Audiophiles (468 comments)

Audiophiles are pretty much the dumbest group of people ever. No, you can't hear a difference between this $5000 speaker and this $150 speaker.

Um, you're dead wrong about that one.

Yeah, you're obviously using the wrong cable. If you had something like this maybe you would have a different opinion.

For the record, anyone that pays $1100 for an HDMI cable should be mauled by angry weasels.

more than 2 years ago
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Online Privacy Worth Less Than Marshmallow Fluff Six Pack

torgis Re:If any google employee can stomach what I surf (223 comments)

If you're gonna go PC, you might as well go full PC. "Little people shitting on the age-enhanced." That sounds good, right?

more than 2 years ago
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Three Unexpected Data Points Describe Elementary School Quality

torgis Re:The Obvious Answer (343 comments)

I have a BS in Computer Science, switched my major from chemistry after my sophomore year, also very strong in biology, biochem, and math. No worries there.

Only if she wants to go into Computer Science. What if she wanted to go into Political Science, Biology, or Medicine?

She does want to go into medicine, which is where my chemistry and biology experience come in handy. I don't have a degree in biology, but I can easily teach it at a high school level. Likewise for chemistry and most everything else at a high school level. It's not hard. Not every high school biology teacher has a BS in Biology, not every high school chemistry teacher has a BS in Chemistry. So I cover the basics, and private tutors and AP classes at the local community college teach her the rest. They have labs and everything. You don't think I considered or researched this stuff before I agreed to let her homeschool?

more than 2 years ago
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Three Unexpected Data Points Describe Elementary School Quality

torgis Re:The Obvious Answer (343 comments)

Not everyone is as big of an asshole as you are.

No, champ. I was on the other end of the mocking, thanks.

more than 2 years ago
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Three Unexpected Data Points Describe Elementary School Quality

torgis Re:The Obvious Answer (343 comments)

Arguments For Public School

She wants to go to Medical School. In a Public HS she can be taught by people that have Degrees in the Sciences and thus might be more able to help her advance then her parents (assuming that either of you don't have a BS in Biology or some science).

I have a BS in Computer Science, switched my major from chemistry after my sophomore year, also very strong in biology, biochem, and math. No worries there.

IB, AP, and Dual Credit courses will but her ahead of the regular curve and get her college credit while in HS.

These are available for her from the local community college, as a homeschooler. Of course, I pay for them just like college credits, but in return she earns college credits for them the same way she would for any AP class in high school. She will be taking those next year once she is prepared for AP level classes.

Labs. most Homeschooled parents are not going to be dissecting Cow Hearts and Whole Cats to name two of the labs she would do in the Dual Credit class for Anatomy.

Funny you mentioned that, because we actually just dissected a couple of chicken hearts the other day. She was grossed out but also fascinated.

I'm not saying any of these are not valid points. If the parent is unwilling to participate, or unable to due to financial constraints, or simply uneducated, then homeschooling is *NOT* a good idea. The parents have to take it very, very seriously. And if the parents are uneducated morons, they will raise uneducated morons. :)

more than 2 years ago
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Three Unexpected Data Points Describe Elementary School Quality

torgis Re:There is never a magic bullet (343 comments)

It's an utterly illegible scribble of swirls and loops. Unique and completely un-reproducible, perfect for a distinct, identifying marker. Almost like a fingerprint.

more than 2 years ago
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Three Unexpected Data Points Describe Elementary School Quality

torgis Re:Gifted Kids Get Short Changed (343 comments)

As a parent of a highly gifted student, this makes me furious. Budget constraints have killed all gifted programs. I would go so far as say this situation is downright unpatriotic. Gifted kids, our nation’s future leaders, inventors, and decision makers are being short changed. I can afford to send my daughter to a private school for gifted kids, but a gifted child of low income parents has a high likelihood of being screwed.

This is very sad indeed. As someone who was able to benefit from being in several gifted schools, I can definitely attest to the usefulness of such programs. The fact that these are among the first areas cut in order to divert money to the lowest-performing students infuriates me. It's the same in my district, with my daughter.

more than 2 years ago
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Three Unexpected Data Points Describe Elementary School Quality

torgis Re:There is never a magic bullet (343 comments)

As a result my daughter never learned to write in cursive

... and nothing of value was lost? I, nor anyone I know, has had any use for knowing this "skill."

likewise. I learned cursive and was forced to use it all through middle school. I switched right back to printing as soon as I was able and all of my written notes all through college were printed. I haven't written cursive in, well, damn. I don't even remember. So yeah, nothing of value lost.

more than 2 years ago
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Three Unexpected Data Points Describe Elementary School Quality

torgis Re:"News for nerds"! (343 comments)

I'll mod any female /.ers Insightful if in their reply they post links to webcam of themselves and their willing female partner performing sexy time.

On 4chan, I believe the phrase is "tits or GTFO". Succinct and to the point.

more than 2 years ago
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Three Unexpected Data Points Describe Elementary School Quality

torgis Re:The Obvious Answer (343 comments)

The problem with homeschooling is finding one that isn't rife with ridiculous religious indoctrination.

This was indeed a big problem for me. I finally found one for my daughter but I am not in the habit of advertising on ./ so I won't name names.

The curriculum is very thorough, it's completely secular, heavy on research/writing assignments, math, and science, which is exactly what she wanted. The only thing I noticed was that her tutor offered to let her skip the section on Darwin and evolution because "it's a theory that has been proven wrong many, many times." However, it was just the instructors opinion and the Darwin segment of her biology studies was completely free of any mention of intelligent design or the like. So I simply chalked it up to it being both her opinion and her fear of offending religious wackos that have a problem with their kids learning science.

more than 2 years ago
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Three Unexpected Data Points Describe Elementary School Quality

torgis Re:The Obvious Answer (343 comments)

They won't have the experience of meeting and mocking people who are different from them.

There, fixed that for ya.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Text message release ruined our lives

torgis torgis writes  |  more than 3 years ago

torgis (840592) writes "An interesting situation here: Kwame Kilpatrick was the mayor of Detroit and engineered his own accidental downfall through a combination of arrogance and stupidity. Among his crimes was perjury — lying in court — about an affair he had with one of his top aides. The truth came to light later when Skytel released thousands of text messages that contradicted his sworn court testimony. Now Kwame and his wife are suing the mobile carrier for damages, claiming that the release of these text messages ruined their lives.

That is undoubtedly true. The question is, since Kwame was an elected official with a city-issued pager, did he have any expectation of privacy? Did he even "own" the messages in question, or are they owned by the taxpayers? This seems like something that any Freedom of Information request would be able to give us.

This has been a big issue here in Detroit, I'm wondering what the Slashdot community in general feels about this."

Link to Original Source
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Best Java book for a long-time Perl fan?

torgis torgis writes  |  about 6 years ago

torgis writes "I've been going on my merry way now writing code at my job — mainly Perl, shell scripts, PHP, and some basic Javascript. Now, I'm being forced to leave the safe confines of an area in which I know a great deal and being thrust out into the bright, scary world of Java development. I am a Java newbie. I have some basic C skills, even less C++, and I can write "Hello world" in Java. Maybe. Yesterday I was assigned a new task: to take over the maintenance of a test system developed by a company we purchased a while back.

The product I'll be testing is written entirely in Java, using Eclipse as the SDK. The test framework is Fitnesse (Google it if you're not familiar, it's the very first link) which uses Java fixtures powered by a wiki-like web-based front end. I will be writing both the Java-based Fixture code in Eclipse and the wiki-based test suites. What scares me is the Java.

With that in mind, is there a book out there, similar to the great "Camel Book" for Perl, that is the de-facto standard in learning Java? If no, which books would you recommend to a die-hard Perl fan looking to learn Java the quick and dirty way?"

Journals

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Best Java book for a long-time Perl user?

torgis torgis writes  |  about 6 years ago So here's the deal...I've been going on my merry way now writing code at my job - mainly Perl, shell scripts, PHP, and some basic Javascript. I also do a whole lot of software testing. Just recently I've been assigned a new task: I need to take over the maintenance of a test system developed by a company we purchased a while back.

The product I'll be testing is written entirely in Java, using Eclipse as the SDK. The test framework is Fitnesse (Google it if you're not familiar, it's the very first link) which uses Java fixtures powered by a wiki-like web-based front end.

Now, I'm being forced to leave the safe confines of an area in which I know a great deal (Perl, shell, and UNIX scripting) and being thrust out into the bright, scary world of Java development. I am a Java newbie. I have some basic C skills, even less C++, and I can write "Hello world" in Java. Maybe.

With that in mind, is there a book out there, similar to the great "Camel Book" for Perl, that is the de-facto standard in learning Java? If no, which books would you recommend to a die-hard Perl fan looking to learn Java the quick and dirty way?

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