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"Big Bang Signal" Could All Be Dust

towermac Re:Still some wiggle room (117 comments)

I'd like to bet somebody a dollar that we go to a steady-state universe in our lifetime.

It's just that the big bang is starting to feel too convenient to me. It's just a feeling.

We take it for granted, but it's just a theory. Red shift: these are the gravitational waves you've been looking for. Well, they're dimensional waves, and have the effect to the observer of stretching space, even though the universe is not expanding. It's complicated...

Any takers?

yesterday
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"Big Bang Signal" Could All Be Dust

towermac Re:Cue "All we are is dust in the wind" (117 comments)

" a God able to create a Universe from a single word"

Doesn't seem plausible. Oh, I believe in a Creator. But I think creating the universe was likely really really hard. Work of a 'lifetime' even.

"forge it to look like it was billions of years old"

Don't see the point of that. Remember; you created the 4 dimensional space-time manifold, so thus obviously exist outside of it. From your perspective, everything happened at once; everything is always happening. By touching something in ancient Egypt or striking dinosaur poop with lightning, you would instantly see the results today and 10,000 years from now. I'm just pointing out that 'forge' is kinda weak.

"Or I could just as easily create the physical laws with the knowledge of the result."

But foreknowledge of the result does not negate the perfection of those laws, or the lack thereof. They either are, or are not, perfect. Whether or not God cheated and looked ahead is irrelevant. I'm going to go out on a limb, and state that the universe and it's laws are perfect. Our science will keep progressing, and we will never find a broken ragged edge to the universe.

If there is such a thing as a perfect law, idk; E=MC2 or whatever, that implies that any old physical laws can't just be easily created. Rather that the laws of the universe have to be exactly what they are, and nothing else. Not that that deserves any special credit; these are the laws of a working universe, and a requirement if you're in the universe building business in the first place. It's all or nothing.

I'll cut to it: I'm with the raw materials guy. The universe came from something. And thermodynamics trumping all other laws, if there is such a hierarchy, has a very good logic to it. It comes down to the very most basic; there is no such thing as magic. Which leaves me with one conclusion: God killed himself to make the universe. It's made out of him. So in the sense that the universe is alive, then so is he. Sort of in the same sense that the deer is still alive in the muscle tissue of the wolf. This is where the religious types that used to like me recoil in horror. ;)

yesterday
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"Big Bang Signal" Could All Be Dust

towermac Re:Cue "All we are is dust in the wind" (117 comments)

Nice open mindedness. Really. But you make one mistake. Your reasoned response assumes that the people they are talking about actually exist, at least in any real numbers.

I've known plenty of thumper Baptist young earth types, and not one of them would engage in any debate on this, or question this research, or anything like that. In fact, they tell their kids the same thing everyone else does about this: "Make good grades and you could be the scientist doing this for a living, and a darned good one." (Depending on how strict they are, they might not say darned.)

There's a handful of these people that these, what are they; radical libs? keep going on about, and they've been here forever. And nobody ever listened to religious nutters before. What it is, is liberalism, unchecked. It's like liberalism is a powerful tool, and when used for a just cause, it's unstoppable and undeniable because it's truth and justice and all that. The last really good one I can think of is King leading the civil rights movement.

Liberalism is sort of leaderless now, but still alive and well, lashing out at Boy Scouts or Christians or Alaskan rednecks or the rich or whoever it is today. But those are not really the causes of our problems today. And the victims seem to pretty much mind their own business, until society screws with them one way or another. Mostly, with exceptions. I'm thinking of the handful of 'nutters?', or they're just lashing out, in a handful of school boards in the south. Almost, about, maybe,... to get a reference to faith into the public school science curriculum. Think about that; that is the extent of their political power now. It's sad really.

I just hate the way they are piling on lately. Thanks for the springboard.

yesterday
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Boeing To Take Space Tourists On Its CST-100 Spacecraft To the ISS

towermac Re:Public access (47 comments)

Yeah I was thinking the same.

You used oligarchs though; I would not have. I'm not against making money, or even the rich.

But I do want my cut, our cut. Which would be about the whole ticket price, wouldn't it, since we just shelled out 4ish billion for it?

3 days ago
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Snowden's Leaks Didn't Help Terrorists

towermac Re:The sad part is... (182 comments)

A Snowden demonizer recently said on these boards, that the act of leaking secrets like these two did, is the ultimate act of arrogance. I do agree with that statement.

In Snowden's case, each and every secret he leaked (with one possible exception that may have been better kept secret) is an obvious violation of the Constitution. So while his initial act could be called arrogant, in the end; he's right, and the entire US government is actually in the wrong. That makes the arrogant label less accurate than the term; 'wise'.

In Manning's case, while there were a couple of nuggets there that should not have been covered up, on the whole; he was very wrong to leak all that. Not even close to worth it, if you value anything about sitting here free, able to post on these boards. Two of among many things that exist because of the government we built. His arrogance remains arrogance, in addition to ignorance, and a self-absorbed attitude that almost makes me jealous. :)

As to Snowden's wisdom, he did pull it off; blowing these secrets out of the water with very little direct collateral damage. The indirect damage of our software industry going in the global shitcan, and other fallout; not his fault. Don't shoot the messenger. I wanted to know this, because our highest law is being broken. And not by bad guys; by us.

As an aside, I'll bet a dollar that Snowden gave himself a 50/50 chance of ending up in Leavenworth or Ecuador, and did not envision becoming stuck in Moscow. I was also surprised at the speed with which the US was able to get the planet to fall in line with revoking his passport and ground him where he was. (Snowden haters: Of course he had to go through Moscow to get to any country that would have protected him from extradition). Or the other possibility, is that Moscow is the only place on the planet in 2014 that is reasonably safe from agents of the US government. That sounds so Tom Clancy, but if true, then Snowden was smart enough to know it.

I should get started on that statue...

4 days ago
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Snowden's Leaks Didn't Help Terrorists

towermac Re:The sad part is... (182 comments)

"... right to know?"

You made that right up. There is no such thing as a right to know.

There is such a thing though, as the right to be free of illegal search and seizure. That's difference between Snowden and Manning. A big one.

5 days ago
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Snowden's Leaks Didn't Help Terrorists

towermac Re:knew in 2006 (182 comments)

But we didn't in 2006, did we? Oh a few did, dismissed by the mainstream as gun loving preppers (mostly) or left wing Bush haters (a bit) and such.

Dupe, blackmailed, or delusional. Those are the only 3 choices? Act of conscience not possible? Or do you just know him well enough to know that?

Free man in Russia - we know he's not though, don't we? Oh he's probably free enough to walk down the street to the store or theater; assigned security in tow. But no, not free at all.

He gave up pretty much everything, didn't he?

5 days ago
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ISIS Bans Math and Social Studies For Children

towermac Re:Anti-math and anti-science ... (952 comments)

"God doesn't want people to have knowledge"

You missed the point of the lesson...

5 days ago
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Scotland's Independence Vote Could Shake Up Industry

towermac Re:This isn't scaremongering. (491 comments)

I know, big banks.

I have never been to Scotland. Here in the US, there are, I guess, thousands and thousands of 'local' banks. Spread across the country, generally serving local customers. Not that they can't land a big international client, there's just a lot more small banks than there are big fish, who are likely to do business with bigger banks anyway.

The Bank of Senatobia Mississippi was (still is I'm sure) a really good full service bank. Our country is littered with banks just like it.

I understand there will be no giant international banks with headquarters in Scotland in the event of a yes vote; they are going to move their headquarters. The phrase "no local banks" just has to be wrong, and sounds like scaremongering.

5 days ago
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Scotland's Independence Vote Could Shake Up Industry

towermac Re:This isn't scaremongering. (491 comments)

Even if the scaremongering has been overdone (this from the perspective of an American spectator), TFS is piling on: "...there will be no local banks."

That is just silly, unless Scotland intends to outlaw banks. I don't think they do.

about a week ago
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NASA's Manned Rocket Contract: $4.2 Billion To Boeing, $2.6 Billion To SpaceX

towermac Re:I hate to be this guy... (187 comments)

It's white guilt man. I'm not sure what we do about it, but I think the first step is recognizing what it is.

All that shit really ain't your fault. You want to pay for your existence? Give something to charity.

After that, try to have it all. Mostly love. But Civics are nice too. And rockets. :)

about a week ago
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Astronomers Find Star-Within-a-Star, 40 Years After First Theorized

towermac Re:The merging must be dramatic, explosive even... (72 comments)

I think it would take too long. Even if the explosion was relativistic it would still be days in the unfolding, wouldn't it? An explosion worth looking at would be weeks? Months in the unfolding? I guess I'm asking as mush as saying.

But no matter, I have a method to see the whole thing in a couple of hours. You.. just.. fly towards it at relativistic speeds, compressing the 'video stream' into a fast forward. You can run it as fast as you can go. You'll need a fancy screen to downsample the view, as what should be visible light, are x-rays to you, or at least UV; again, depending on your speed.

And don't forget to turn off quickly and go back home, right before the show appears to be over...

about a week ago
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Astronomers Find Star-Within-a-Star, 40 Years After First Theorized

towermac Re:Wait, these are for real? (72 comments)

That would be a bummer man. Let's go with the star in a star thing. Almost as cool as guns that shoot guns.

about a week ago
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Astronomers Find Star-Within-a-Star, 40 Years After First Theorized

towermac Re:Wait, these are for real? (72 comments)

Yeah I clicked through to the article. No idea why I did that but:

It's red supergiant with too much lithium, molybdenum and other metals. There's 'something' in there.

Gravity keeps one star inside the other, as in, the neutron star fell into the supergiant. It sank to the center.

Around the surface of the neutron star is now where the 'core' of the red supergiant is, still burning hydrogen (or was it helium?) as a red supergiant should.

Sounded like some subtle measurements to distinguish this one from all the other red supergiants they looked at.

I should get karma for this. Just sayin'.

about a week ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

towermac Re:Tax? (323 comments)

"a business should not be classed as a person for legal purposes and that no taxation should be levied on industry or business at all"

You nailed it. And no, I'm not for letting the rich off easy.

By taxing corporations, that helps make them into people. Taxation without representation. We used to think that was a big deal.

I think corporations have way too much representation now. And yet they can't vote. Corporations are all owned by people, who can vote, and are legitimate tax targets.

Another thing; income is not income until a person gets it. Tax the people, not pieces of paper...

about a week ago
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Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

towermac Re:We call this propaganda. (191 comments)

Wow, you kids with your high uids.

I'll give you that it does take a bit of talent to take something fairly pure and wholesome, and twist it like you did into something dark and oppressive. A tip though: substituting 'your' for 'you're' blows you out of the water as a 12 year old. Just letting you know.

about a week ago
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New Details About NSA's Exhaustive Search of Edward Snowden's Emails

towermac Re:Moot point... (200 comments)

I'll tell you, that to me, It wasn't so much a problem in the past. Almost everything the spies, spooks, informants do is illegal in some way.

HP just got nailed for corruption. When a secret agent gives us intel in exchange for money, in other words, our CIA at work; how is that any different? It it was obviously an illegal act in the agent's country to leak state secrets. We paid him to break his own law.

The difference used to be, that they operated outside the law. And that was our protection; none of it could be used against you. Well, unless you were some real deal foreign agent.

That's the line that has moved. They have always spied on everything, and the day they catch a jihadist with a nuke backpack right before he enters Manhattan, we will both be glad they were spying on whoever it took. It's the rest of it, with the FISA courts and the regular courts and the sharing with local law enforcement and everything else that makes it so scary.

about a week ago
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Canon Printer Hacked To Run Doom Video Game

towermac Re:Right fix (89 comments)

The problem is, the DOOM thing happens to my office printers far less often than me needing to quickly get into the thing and fix it or figure out what the user's issue is.

The account/password thing not helping me out there. It wasn't broken before, Canon. It will make no difference to office security, but will eventually cost you sales. (Well, you sucked already at printers, so maybe not a lot of sales.)

about a week ago
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Extent of Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches Record Levels

towermac Re:Lets not forget (630 comments)

"I think a Carbon Tax is the wrong approach because it does not explicitly limit emissions in any way"

It does limit it, dollar for dollar. As opposed to Cap and Trade, where you are buying and selling pollution.

"; as long as its still profitable, "

Let's assume no activity will have happened in the first place without profit...

"emissions will occur."

when carbon is burned, whether they've bought the right to pollute or not.

" Cap and Trade, on the other hand, explicitly limits industry-wide emissions and requires individual companies to set a value on their limited emissions in the free market."

Not a free market. A made up government created market in name only.

A real carbon tax would not only be good for saving the planet, it would actually be good for the economy. Well, assuming that some existing tax was backed off; obviously piling new taxes on top of existing would not be good for the economy.

about a week ago
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New Details About NSA's Exhaustive Search of Edward Snowden's Emails

towermac Re:Again? (200 comments)

I'll say that I doubt Snowden raised holy hell on an ongoing basis within the halls of the NSA. For one thing, he's tech support; it wasn't his job.

But he already said he didn't believe there was a viable whistle blower process, a fact corroborated by recent history. I wouldn't expect there to be some emial trail of disaffection.

Also, why email? I think you might be an idiot to put these concerns into email in the first place. My first instinct would be to go to some boss, and tell him to his face. Unless Nixon was there, there's unlikely to be a record of that meeting.

about a week ago

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