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Feces-Filled Capsules Treat Bacterial Infection

tpjunkie Re: Former C. Diff Patient here ... (135 comments)

C. diff infections are NOT always caused by antibiotic "overdose," which isn't really a thing - there's dose related toxicity for some classes of antibiotics, but not overdose. In the healthcare setting, infections are usually caused by overgrowth in the setting of depleted colonic flora, but symptomatic infections can also happen with contact with a patient already experiencing a C. diff infection - two years ago, a resident at my hospital ended up with such a severe infection she picked up from a patient that she nearly ended up with a total colectomy. In the community setting, about 50% of cases occurred without any prior antibiotic exposure in the past 30-90 days, at least according to a recent meta-analysis [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25058469].

about a month and a half ago
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Feces-Filled Capsules Treat Bacterial Infection

tpjunkie MD here... (135 comments)

These are for patients who have recurrent C. diff, who have already failed PO vancomycin or fidaxomycin (difficid). Those are the only two antibiotics we really have after you fail metronidazole therapy. It's not an issue of strongness; it's penetrating into encysted bacteria which vancomycin does fairly poorly, and fidaxomycin does only moderately better. At that point, options are fecal therapy, another round of vanc or difficid with increasingly diminishing returns, or in severe cases, colectomy.

about a month and a half ago
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UCSD To Test Safety of Spinal Stem Cell Injection

tpjunkie Upbeat about this trial (43 comments)

I own stock in the company conducting the trial (AMEX: CUR), and this phase I study is really more of a formality, as they have finished injections in the cervical and lumbar spine for a phase IIB study using the same stem cells in ALS patients; thus far the safety profile has been excellent (efficacy hasn't been rigorously looked at yet, but the initial results are promising). The results in rat models for spinal cord injury were very impressive, if this stuff translates it'll be a real game changer...I've read most of their published data so far and everything looks legit.

about 3 months ago
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Evidence of a Correction To the Speed of Light

tpjunkie Re:Ummm (347 comments)

The time period over which pair production-annhilation occurs might be a small part of the correction here, but from my quick reading of TFA, I think the key phrase is "This results in a small correction to the angular frequency of a photon and thus its velocity," where velocity is the key word. Velocity of course is a vector quantity, consisting of both a speed (c) and a direction. The key aspect here is the direction; when the pair recombines, the total energy of the system is slightly different as the positron-electron pair is affected by gravity and thus may pick up a small positive or negative acceleration from the gravitational potential they are traveling through. When they recombine this will be reflected in the new velocity (c d) of the resultant photon, which is not exactly the same as the photon prior to pair production. At least thats what I got, but I'm the wrong kind of doctor to be an expert in this. Any PhD's wanna weigh in and correct me, please do!

about 5 months ago
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Wikipedia Medical Articles Found To Have High Error Rate

tpjunkie Re:I am a physician... (200 comments)

oof. Clearly, I meant training...which totally didn't happen because of any sleep-deprivation, honestly...

about 6 months ago
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Wikipedia Medical Articles Found To Have High Error Rate

tpjunkie I am a physician... (200 comments)

in residency, and yes, from time to time I'll look up something on wikipedia on my phone for a quick overview if its a condition I'm not familiar with, or is outside my specialty, and I'm rounding or otherwise away from a computer. However, I don't use it for treatment or diagnostic purposes; there exist much better, peer reviewed sources for that, which I will happily access from a computer. That being said, I'd say a large amount of the wikipedia articles tend to be pretty decent, and at least sound as if they've been written by someone with some sort of formal medical treatment. They get the quick and dirty job done about 75% of the time for me.

about 6 months ago
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UW Researchers Demonstrate First Direct Communication Between Human Brains

tpjunkie Re:With further development ... (154 comments)

Excellent idea, from my understanding of the process demonstrated above, yes, this could work, as this would be above the neurological level of the lesion in most patients suffering from locked in syndrome. - I am a physician.

about a year ago
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A Look At Quantum Computer Manufacturer D-Wave and Its Founder

tpjunkie Re:the missing fine print (96 comments)

I wish. I'm a broke medical intern. But hey, whatever you want to tell yourself.

about a year and a half ago
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A Look At Quantum Computer Manufacturer D-Wave and Its Founder

tpjunkie Re:Not a QC! (96 comments)

I submitted the article. I called it a QC, because if you read TFS, there are a couple of papers linked indicating that there seems to be evidence that the machine is functioning as an adiabatic quantum computer. Of course, these results have been challenged. However, for the purposes of a summary, it seemed in my mind, ok to call it what the manufacturer does, which is an adiabatic quantum computer.

about a year and a half ago
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U.S. House Wants 'Sustained Human Presence On the Moon and the Surface of Mars'

tpjunkie Re:Unfunded mandate? (285 comments)

Not only that, but the funding level for NASA is actually lowered by 5% to boot. I suppose no one should be surprised that the people who seem to have difficulty with science also have difficulties with math. Unless they think going to Mars is going to be a cheap proposition.

about a year and a half ago
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Supreme Court: No Patents For Natural DNA Sequences

tpjunkie Re:Be still, my heart! (214 comments)

Assuming that you're targeting processed mRNA. I feel the same way as you however. I believe that producing cDNA of a naturally occurring protein (whether wild type or novel mutation) is not "creation" per se, so much as translation (well, reverse translation followed by reverse transcription if you want to be anal) of an existing, natural item. Are translations patentable? Perhaps copyright is more appropriate, although the existing copyright laws might actually be worse than patent law.

about a year and a half ago
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Bloomberg Reporters Caught Spying On Terminal Users

tpjunkie As a former Bloomberg employee, and terminal user (55 comments)

This is not really news. The terminal has an instant messenger application built into it. If you have a buddy list with the users in question in it, you can see without doing ANYTHING whether or not that user is signed into their terminal. Furthermore, even if you are not using the instant messenger, you can always do the equivalent of a "whois" search for a user and it will tell you their status. As far as determining the functions a user is using, that is due to the analytics department whose function it is to assist users with obtaining information and helping them use various functions of the terminal. Not sure why the news division had access.

about a year and a half ago
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Apple and Google Joining Forces On Kodak Patents Bid

tpjunkie Kodachrome (97 comments)

There are going to be a lot of patents that neither Apple or Google really care about in that portfolio, but people in film photography might. First and foremost in my mind is the proprietary dyes used in processing Kodachrome film, which Kodak stopped manufacturing years ago, and the last processor, Dwayne's Photo in Kansas stopped processing at the end of 2010. It would sure be *not evil* to release these formulas to the public, and perhaps we could see something like the group who reproduced polaroid film.

about 2 years ago
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Disney to Acquire Lucasfilm, Star Wars Episode 7 Due In 2015

tpjunkie Re:Seriously? (816 comments)

Ok, now I am gnashing my teeth

about 2 years ago
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Disney to Acquire Lucasfilm, Star Wars Episode 7 Due In 2015

tpjunkie Seriously? (816 comments)

Let the wailing and gnashing of teeth begin! Then again, it couldn't be worse than episodes 1 and 2.

about 2 years ago
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Caffeine Linked To Lower Skin Cancer Risk

tpjunkie Basal Cell Carcinoma? Big deal... (130 comments)

Basal cell carcinomas are very slow growing, very, very rarely invasive, and almost hardly metastasize. They're gross, unsightly and unpleasant, but not really a killer. If this were melanoma on the other hand, that'd be a big deal.

more than 2 years ago
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Virtual Reality Helmet Designed For Deep Space Surgery

tpjunkie Re:I am a medical student, (83 comments)

Well, that'll handle the trach, but if you can do an open appy with a pen and a knife, I'd be seriously impressed. Anyway, the "black bag" includes drape, sterile gloves, scalpel (he later explained how to get those onto planes), basic surgical tools, 3 different IV antibiotics, strong narcotic analgesics (he was less forthcoming about these), and a variety of other things, for various contingencies. There are a number of issues with operating in free-fall, dealing mostly with positioning, and being unable to get gravity assisting you in moving viscera and blood around. I would thing sterility would be a somewhat lesser concern that could be addressed with draping and antibiotics. Of course, figuring out which other astronaut gets to be your scrub nurse is a whole different story. In any case, anything beyond the most minor of surgeries is pretty much going to be off the table (zing!).

more than 2 years ago
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Virtual Reality Helmet Designed For Deep Space Surgery

tpjunkie I am a medical student, (83 comments)

I have to ask, why not just send a physician along to any long term deep space mission? There are 5 aerospace medicine residency programs in the country, not to mention the fact that anyone applying for the astronaut positions at NASA gets credited with "work experience" for having completed an MD degree. I believe there are even a few currently active astronauts who are physicians. There isn't much substitute for someone who actually knows what they're doing, and as a (near legendary) trauma surgeon/professor at my medical school is fond of repeating, you can pack a "black bag" with about 10 pounds of equipment that will have you ready for just about anything in the woods, from a emergency tracheostomy to an open appendectomy.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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A look at quantum computer manufacturer D-Wave and its founder

tpjunkie tpjunkie writes  |  about a year and a half ago

tpjunkie (911544) writes "Many slashdot readers will remember D-wave's announcement in 2007 of its quantum computer, an announcement met with skepticism and a good amount of scorn. However, today the company has sold quantum computers to such companies as Lockheed Martin and Google, and their computers have gone from a handful of qubits to 512 in their most recent offerings. Nature has a story including an interview with the company's founder Geordi Rose, and a look at where the company is headed and some of the difficulties it has overcome."
Link to Original Source
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Kepler finds 2 exoplanets in one star's habitable zone

tpjunkie tpjunkie writes  |  about a year and a half ago

tpjunkie (911544) writes "Nasa's Kepler mission announced the discovery of two rocky exoplanets in the same system both orbiting in the habitable zone of their star, Kepler-62, located 1200 light years away. Both planets are slightly larger than Earth, and estimates of their mass indicates they may be oceanic in nature."
Link to Original Source

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