×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

CmdrTaco: Anti-Beta Movement a "Vocal Minority"

trb poll? (30 comments)

Sounds like a good slashdot poll question - what do you think of the beta?

about 2 months ago
top

The Ig Nobels Are Tonight

trb August Sanders Theater (41 comments)

It may be Harvard University's august Sanders Theater. It is not Harvard University's August Sanders Theater. It was not named for a person called August Sanders.

about 7 months ago
top

Washington Post hacked

trb Re:More sources (3 comments)

I think Fox is wrong. I believe the explanation I quote below, from this link, is correct.

http://www.zdnet.com/what-happened-to-the-new-york-times-website-7000019453/

Specifically, according to a source close to the NYT, the primary cause for the outage was due to bad firewall configuration change that blocked all incoming traffic and for some reason the IT staff wasn't able to rollback the change.

about 8 months ago
top

John E. Karlin, Who Led the Way To All-Digit Dialing, Dies At 94

trb Re:upside down keypads? (120 comments)

That's amusing. It's definitely possible to interpret the text the way you describe, and looking again, I'm sure that's what the author intended. But not only is the preceding phrase describing 123 on the top, so is the following phrase. So the parenthetical phrase refers to the 123 on the bottom, but in "it made for more accurate dialing," "it" flips back to 123 on top.

about a year ago
top

John E. Karlin, Who Led the Way To All-Digit Dialing, Dies At 94

trb Re:upside down keypads? (120 comments)

Yes, the upside down keypads are his "fault." The obit has the info wrong. Adding machine keypads always had the lower numbers at the bottom, and so do computer keypads. You can google for about this, but I think he figured that American phone users (who mostly weren't adding machine users) were used to reading from left to right and top to bottom, hence the order.

about a year ago
top

Air Force Sends Mystery Mini-Shuttle Back To Space

trb one-quarter the size (123 comments)

These high-tech mystery machines — 29 feet long — are about one-quarter the size of NASA's old space shuttles and can land automatically on a runway.

The X-37B is not one-quarter the size of the Space Shuttle, it's one-quarter the length of the Space Shuttle. The launch weight of the X-37B is 5.5 tons. The launch weight of the Space Shuttle is 125 tons. This ignorance about the meaning of dimensions reminds me of the Stonehenge scene from Spinal Tap.

about a year ago
top

What tech would you un-invent?

trb Re:Guns? (572 comments)

Guns can be used for attack and defense. They can be used for killing innocent people, they can also be used to protect innocent people. It has been said, "God made men, Samuel Colt made them equal."

about a year and a half ago
top

Why Non-Coders Shouldn't Write Code

trb it's easier than Japanese. (421 comments)

From tfa:

Inspired by the dictate within its Japanese parent company Rakuten to have all its employees become fluent in English, Jaconi decided to have everyone, from himself down to the interns, learn to code.

In other words, if anything, he should really be inspired by his parent company to force all his employees to learn Japanese, but JavaScript is easier.

about a year and a half ago
top

The Linux security stick you give to your clueless friends

trb Re:who gives a (3 comments)

re paying for a script, the value of a software product is not determined by whether its code is compiled or interpreted. re running old anti-malware, i assume you'll be able to update the control files for that over the web. re USB devices being writeable, I think a call to "mount -o ro,remount" on the stick solves that, doesn't it? re web surfing on an infected machine, usually it's the hard drive that's infected, and this system won't be using the hard drive as source for program files. if the nvram was corrupt, i assume this tool would be smart enough to deal with that too.

about 2 years ago
top

How Satnav Maps Are Made

trb old school (48 comments)

LISP had MAPCAR 50 years ago.

about 2 years ago
top

'Inventor of Email' Gets Support of Noam Chomsky

trb Re:Ask a better question (288 comments)

Articles mentioned him copyrighting the term EMAIL (and I repeated that non-fact), but his claim is really on the name EMAIL and his copyright, which was on his program and user manual, as noted on his web site here.

http://www.inventorofemail.com/

He calls himself the "inventor of email" which is silly. He registered a copyright with the US copyright office. Again, there did not seem to be any innovation involved. He wrote an email program, and registered his copyright. The only remotely interesting thing about it is that it was named EMAIL. If he had produced a television and called it TELEVISION, and it was after other people had already produced and refined televisions, it would be false to claim to be the inventor of television.

about 2 years ago
top

'Inventor of Email' Gets Support of Noam Chomsky

trb Re:Ask a better question (288 comments)

The guy wrote a program called EMAIL, and he copyrighted the name EMAIL. If he wrote a program called FMAIL, he could have copyrighted the name FMAIL. That doesn't mean he invented anything or did anything innovative. Again, saying he "invented email" is silly.

about 2 years ago
top

'Inventor of Email' Gets Support of Noam Chomsky

trb Re:Ask a better question (288 comments)

RFC 524 proposed a networked mail protocol in 1973. It notes that there was already a MAIL command for sending networked mail (on the ARPANET).

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc524

I agree that the guy's claim is dopey, and I'm not paying careful attention to Chomsky's claim, but I suspect that here he is playing some semantic game that he finds relevant in theory, but serves no useful purpose in fact.

about 2 years ago
top

Russian Satellite Takes Most Detailed 121-Megapixel Image of Earth Yet

trb Re:Sweet! (123 comments)

A photo image like this tends to have pixels that each store 24 bits of RGB color (one of about 16.7 million light colors). A color laser printer pixel usually has one of four pixel ink colors (cyan, magenta, yellow, or black). You can compare the pixels, but you shouldn't compare them one to one.

about 2 years ago
top

MIT Researchers Invent 'Super Glass'

trb superhydrophobia (199 comments)

so this glass has really bad rabies?

about 2 years ago
top

AMD Says It's 'Ambidextrous,' Hints It May Offer ARM Chips

trb ambidextrous (140 comments)

How will I decide whether I want a right ARM or a left ARM? If they are ambidextrous, will it matter?

more than 2 years ago
top

What If the Apollo Program Never Happened?

trb Re:Ironic? (756 comments)

The fact that NASA went to the moon in 1969 was interesting, exciting, and fun. I remember where I was that day. At the dentist, with a portable tv from home, and when we put it in back the trunk of our car, we smashed the rabbit-ears antenna that we forgot to fold down before we shut the trunk lid.

That said, the question isn't "was it cool?" or even "was it worth it?" It's "what if Apollo never happened?

Most of us agree that it was cool. Was the expenditure to get a man on the moon worth it? Let's say it cost 40 billion 1970 dollars, which is like 100 billion today dollars (that's not exact, but in the ballpark). Was it that much money's worth of cool? Hard to say, but that's not really important to the "what if" question. And I bet if Apollo were a new project today, it would cost a trillion dollars. Especially considering that it cost the USA 15 billion dollars to reroute 10 miles of highway under Boston.

People who are saying that we wouldn't have the internet or tang or teflon are mistaken, because the moon money might have been spent on other science projects. As it was, the space program was allied with the techno-military-industrial complex already, so other innovation would have happened even without a moonshot.

I'm not a moon landing hoax person, but I know enough about science to understand that the cost of doing stuff on the moon and especially on distant celestial bodies, because of the distances and the hostile environments, makes it all rather impractical. Doing stuff in weightlessness, sure. In geosynchronous earth orbit, sure. On the moon? Maybe. But sending people to Mars or Jupiter or Alpha Centauri is more of a sucker's bet.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

Journals

trb has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...