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Comments

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Rover Curiosity Discovers Australia-Shaped Rock On Mars

turkeyfish Only to those who are geographically challenged (99 comments)

One might pretend that the chunk missing from the rock on one side looks like the Gulf of Carpentaria, but there is no corresponding Great Australian Bight on the other side.

This article only provides evidence of possibly three things: 1) to many in the media and general public are geographically challenged or 2) the Mars Rover Mission is desperate to find a handle on maintaining public interest and relevance or 3) Slahdot has once again found yet another way for slashdoters to waste their time by entertaining themselves with nonsense and to make itself even less relevant as a site informative with regard to technology and science. A more informative piece would have involved a discussion with some experts on Martian geology suggesting what the shape of Martian rocks tells us about the red planet that we don't already know.

about a week ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Ignorance (509 comments)

You confuse scientific evidence with opinion. There is NO scientific evidence that suggests that it is anything other than human activity resulting from the burning of fossil fuels that is the cause of the observed warming. If that were not so, then those who deny its getting warmer wouldn't be so reluctant to explain how it is that, if the world isn't getting any warmer, all of the world's glaciers and icesheets are melting faster than at any time in recorded geological history.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:anti-science pols always Republican (509 comments)

There are lots of very good scientific reasons to be concerned about GMO's creating artificial environments that can rapidly alter the rest of the natural world. There is abundant evidence for concern with many GMO crops already.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:link is about GMO crops (509 comments)

Safe for who? Those who benefit from company profits or those whose survival depends on an environment that has up until now sustained humanity because we haven't generated enough artificial selection to as yet noticeable muck it up?

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:Forest, not Trees (509 comments)

What we need is a census for redistricting purposes every 5 years, not every 10. The modern world is simply moving too fast for a 10 year rule to keep us competitive with other nations. This would make gerrymandering less advantageous and hence less of a problem. This also makes sense from an economic perspective as well, since the population is so much larger now and its impacts on ecosystems that sustain it larger and of more consequence now.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:I'm against age discrimination, but re-thinking (509 comments)

Better yet, lets start insisting that all politicians pass scientific literacy tests, if for no other reason than amusement.

If teachers are going to be held accountable, why not politicians?

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:Idiocracy (509 comments)

Much of "Obama's" FDA is filled with people staffed during the Bush I, Clinton and Bush II years. Scientific illiteracy knows no political boundaries. Its a symptom of the breadth of scientific illiteracy in our entire population. We should also keep in mind that scientific illiteracy is also to be found even among the scientifically literate when dealing with other disciplines of science.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:Idiocracy (509 comments)

You have hit the nail on the head! We play wack-a-mole with ourselves.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:Idiocracy (509 comments)

As of March 26, 2014, it is estimated to number 7.154 billion by the United States Census Bureau (USCB). As of April 4, 2014, the United States has a total population of 317.8 million (USCB). Thus, the population of the US is about 4.4% of the planet's human population, not 33.3%. This is yet another example of Americans thinking of themselves as more important than they really are. By population alone the rest of the world has been outpacing the US for some time. At current growth rates the Chinese economy (5 year average GDP at 10.62%) will surpass that of the US (5 year average growth rate 0.207%) in size in about 10 years, assuming they don't choke themselves to death producing products largely for US consumption.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish An other idiot (509 comments)

Who erroneously seems to think that temperatures only occur in the U.S. or North America. Globally the mean temperature continues to rise.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:AGW Jihadists are the culprit (509 comments)

If you want want to directly observe evolution such as trout and pitbulls, all you need to do is live longer.

Actually, its easy to observe evolution in action by looking at bacteria and other organisms with rapid generation times, such a fruit flies. That evolution can be observed in fruit flies has been repeatedly demonstrated for the past 130 years. It is now so completely understood that this is possible that whether it can be demonstrated or not is no longer scientifically relevant, having been answered in the affirmative. Outstanding questions pertain to the consequences of specific examples of the evolution observed.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:AGW Jihadists are the culprit (509 comments)

Exactly. The forefront of modern morphology currently rests in establishing the quantitative functional links between particular combinations of genes, quantifiable environmental factors characterizing the direction and magnitude of selection, and the morphology defined in the context of analytic geometry and geometric algebra. As we learn more about how genes generate morphology and how both are influenced by selection, expect many more quantitative predictions.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:AGW Jihadists are the culprit (509 comments)

Your comment demonstrates a lack of understanding of the scientific method. Science deals with experimental outcomes that establish truth about the natural world. Either the ideas tested confirm a hypothesis or they reject it. "Dialogue" is irrelevant. A well designed scientific experiment leaves no room for ambiguity. Science is not sophism. Don't confuse the two.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:always Republicans (509 comments)

"Congress isn't "all idiots"...for every bullshit anti-science law Congress passes there are Democrats/Progressives who vote against it"

True, but not enough of them. Therein lies the crux of the problem. Science and consequently humanity desperately needs more democrats and less republicans in office. Just like difference between chimps and humans in DNA, that 1% difference results in a very big difference in consequences.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:The symptom, not the true problem. (509 comments)

I guess you haven't heard about the Martian rovers. We have landed on Mars.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:To Be Fair... (509 comments)

"To be fair, nobody can verify evolution or global warming in their own garage (without lots of money or time)."

Actually, they can if they tried. In the first case all one needs is a few petri dishes and various media and a few strains of bacteria, all readily available in a garage. Likewise, with global warming. Bill Nye the science guy showed a very nice experiment of the effect of CO2 in the atmosphere upon heating a few closed flasks and measuring the temperature with a couple of heat lamps, also easily done in a garage.

The problem is not a monetary one. Rather its the difference between clear, logical analytic thinking and the lack thereof. Fundamentally, both are rather simple and testable in the context of scientific experiment.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:The symptom, not the true problem. (509 comments)

The scoundrels are particularly eager to lead people to believe that there is no difference. Compare politicians objectively and there are BIG differences. Even, given a diet of dog shit, that 1-2% difference becomes the difference between survival and death. Choose wisely or suffer the consequences.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish No (509 comments)

Reporters are mere window dressing for the advertisements. Don't kid yourself, there is plenty of reason in deception.

They report what they are paid to report. As consumers of news we must be wise enough to turn to those with some modicum of credibility. We need more objective ways to keep score that are independent of the media. In the absence of intelligence, AI is at least a viable option.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Re:Don't worry (509 comments)

With the consequences of ever increasing global warming and the consequent collapse of ecosystem, intense selection for much smarter people is just right around the corner. The only real question now is whether given the intensity of selection that shall soon occur shortly, there will be any humans smart enough to survive. Most people have little idea of what is about to happen as the pH of the oceans falls another 0.1 to 0.4 in log hydromium ion concentrations. A 0.1-0.2 pH drop is already in the cards as the oceans come into equilibrium with current atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the next 50 to 100 years so the intense selection regime is already baked into our planetary system.

about two weeks ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

turkeyfish Reconciling the Irreconcilable (509 comments)

"Somehow we need to find a way to promote science as a way of thinking and do so without hurting the feelings of the religious right."

The religious right are NEVER going to accept science, since science inconveniently exposes the inconsistency and irrelevancy of religion to understanding the natural world and hence this makes the scientific method a threat to the religious right.

The outcome is pretty clear, either science wins or humanity looses. The reality is that there is only one of these two outcomes to choose from. Take your pick and take your stand. One can either be for science and survival or against science and for human-sustaining ecosystem collapse. One cannot stand on a fence made of razor wire as there is no middle ground.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Deutsche Telecom rolls out 400 Gbps Service

turkeyfish turkeyfish writes  |  more than 2 years ago

turkeyfish writes "Deutsche Telecom rolls out 400 Gbps service over a single channel to select customers, more than doubling the top US and Canadian rates of 186 Gbps.

With the use of Alcatel Lucent software technology, DT will be able to deliver on a single optical fiber a total of 48 channels — making the total potential throughput up to 24.6Tbps (terabits per second) — or the equivalent of 3,696 CDs per second.

Does this recent development provide further evidence that US leadership in telecommunications technology and is rapidly slipping away? Does this together with dramatic improvements in commercial internet service in Korea, Japan, and other countries, who already have much higher average bandwidths available to their citizens at much lower cost and who are now more heavily investing per capita in education and telecommunications development than does the US, indicate that the US is now in danger of falling even further behind?

What does full commercial roll out of such high bandwidth technologies portend for the development of global internet service economies given that Germany may soon have the technological and economic edge in the race for global information control and its consequent impact on global economic supremacy?

Will this development give German data mining companies an upper hand in economic and political competition among nations?

Is there anything the US can do to catch up or will US IT customers be happy to see DT replace ATT, Verizon, and other US carriers for their bandwidth needs given their newly emerging spare capacity?

Besides wanting to move to Germany, what would you do with 400Gbps service?"

Link to Original Source
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Huge Increase In Beaufort Gyre Detected

turkeyfish turkeyfish writes  |  more than 2 years ago

turkeyfish writes "UK scientists are reporting today in the journal Nature Geoscience that a huge bulge of freshwater is forming in the Western Arctic Ocean caused by a large gyre of freshwater. The gyre appears to indicate that the ice is becoming thin enough over the Arctic Ocean that the wind is beginning to affect the motion of water under the ice. A sudden release of this water or its emergence to the surface will greatly accelerate the melting of the remaining polar oceanic ice and likely alter oceanic circulation in the North Atlantic."
Link to Original Source
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Java to be Restricted to Enterprise Use Only?

turkeyfish turkeyfish writes  |  more than 3 years ago

turkeyfish (950384) writes "InfoWorld is reporting that
a pair of analysts at Forrester Research are claiming that Oracle will confine the use of Java to enterprise use. With Oracle imposing tighter control over how Java
can be used for broad use and use by third parties and the apparrent collapse of the Java Community Process evidenced by the Apache Foundation's departure from the JCP, how will
the future of Java in the broader community be affected? Where will those in places like universities, where much Java inovation has taken place in the past, go as the sun apparently sets on
the the concept of "Write Once, Run Anywhere", especially as budgets shrink at universities, non-profit organizations, and many small commercial shops and as the future of alternatives hang in the legal limbo of litigation?

What alternatives, if any, are developer's in such environments considering as the new reality that government no longer has a role to play and consequently both the internet and programming languages become tiered, into those for the have's and those for the have nots?"

Link to Original Source
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Java to be Rstricted to Enterprise Use Only?

turkeyfish turkeyfish writes  |  more than 3 years ago

turkeyfish (950384) writes "InfoWorld is reporting that analysts at Forrester Research are claiming that Oracle is planning to restrict Java to a specialty niche as a tool for commercial enterprise development. What do slashdot users predict will be the future of Java as a lingua universalis of multiple computing platforms? Is the concept of "Write once, run anywhere dead" or are there other languages that will take over after Java becomes a speciality language? If so, which ones?"
Link to Original Source

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