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Comments

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Adobe Photoshop Is Coming To Linux, Through Chromebooks

tverbeek Re:There is no more Photoshop. (166 comments)

Half correct. Adobe's Creative Cloud software is subscription software, but it is not web-based. The "cloud" bit in the name is just buzzword bingo; the apps are installed and run locally as Windows/OS X executable binaries, just as they always have, with check-ins to confirm that you've paid your protection money this month.

Of course the subscription aspect is reason enough for many people to walk way from Adobe (as I have). I know many illustrators have turned to the Manga Studio for comics production, or the GIMP if they can accept its limitations (e.g. lacking CMYK support). Some people can likewise get by with Free software such as Inkscape or Scribus to replace Illustrator and InDesign, respectively. Serif (which currently has graphics apps for Windows) is undertaking development of a full-featured commercial Creative Suite replacement for OS X, and their Illustrator-substitute Affinity Designer (first piece of the puzzle) is nearly ready for release.

yesterday
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Chrome For Mac Drops 32-bit Build

tverbeek Re:independent support (129 comments)

So I guess your eyes glossed over before you got the part where I talked about how someone is still maintaining current releases of Firefox to run on the original iMac (from the 20th century)?

about two weeks ago
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Chrome For Mac Drops 32-bit Build

tverbeek independent support (129 comments)

Why would there be any question that Chromium could still be compiled for 32-bit CPUs? It it's open-source, it can be. The only question is whether anyone cares enough to do it.

The Firefox devs walked away from PPC processors some time ago, but there's enough interest in that platform that an independent fork of its code has been maintained.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Paid NFL $400 Million To Use Surface, But Announcers Call Them iPads

tverbeek generic® (405 comments)

Do they wipe the screens of their ipads with kleenexes and q-tips, which they keep with the band-aids and aspirin next to a refrigerator full of cokes, in the room where they make xeroxes, next to the escalator?

about three weeks ago
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John Romero On Reinventing the Shooter

tverbeek !Shooter ? (266 comments)

One of the biggest limitations of the Shooter genre is right there in the name.

about three weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

tverbeek Re:Scientific Consensus (770 comments)

No, mathematics and logic are about provability. Real-world phenomena can't be proven; they can only be shown to have worked a certain way every time we've observed them so far. (I've dropped this rock 100,000 times, and every time it has fallen ... but I can't prove that it will next time.) If you want absolute proof you need to stick to theoretical phenomena. Or chuck it all and just believe something with absolute faith because it's written in an old book, like the other people who are afraid of their "truths" being subject to challenge.

about three weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

tverbeek "soft" science (770 comments)

The notion that climate science or economics can't repeat experiments is not entirely fair. While it's true that we can't conduct isolated double-blind experiments under identical conditions, we can conduct tests under analogous conditions to determine whether a given model is accurate or not, which is the real goal of such science. Given enough instances in which the accumulation of carbon compounds in the atmosphere leads to an overall increase in temperatures, or in which an increase in government spending or low-end wages stimulates economic activity in a market economy, we can make the inference of a correlation, and start looking for a mechanism of a causal connection.

about three weeks ago
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Did you use technology to get into mischief as a child?

tverbeek N/A (231 comments)

We didn't have technology yet when I were a wee lad. I didn't even put my hands on a computer (terminal) until my junior year in high school. There was POTS, but I've never liked telephones. Electric typewriters, but no real fun to be had with those. Xerography, but at 10 cents each, who had that kind of money?

about a month ago
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Apple Reveals the Most Common Reasons That It Rejects Apps

tverbeek impure (132 comments)

Of course apps are also rejected because they don't meet the arbitrary standards of puritanism that Apple applies, or allow the user to purchase content that doesn't meet those standards. Such as digital comics containing male nudity.

about a month ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Phone Apps?

tverbeek Re:yo. (167 comments)

no

about 1 month ago
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California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

tverbeek Re:Never gonna work ... (506 comments)

* "there would be no significant delay"

about a month ago
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California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

tverbeek Re:Never gonna work ... (506 comments)

"If you're reading the newspaper, you are not going to be able to transition to operating the vehicle in the event the computer gives up and says it's all up to you."

I don't think you understand the topic of conversation here. We're not talking about situations in which the computer says, "Excuse me, Dave, but I'm not sure what to do here. Could you please drive for me?" We're talking about situations in which Dave says, "WTF! You're heading for a cliff!" and chooses to take control. Maybe it takes him some seconds to notice the problem before he takes action, but once he does notice, there would be significant delay before he puts his foot down on the brake and his hands on the wheel.

about a month ago
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California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

tverbeek Re:Not surprising (506 comments)

One of the things that bugs me about so many high-tech devices is the lack of an "off" switch (and in the case of a vehicle, substitute "stop"). On ye olde personal computers, IBM put a big red paddle-switch that summarily deprived the electronics of electricity. Flip that, and it was OFF. (Even the clock.) These days, it's a button (and pretty soon just a contact-sensitive control spot) that asks the system to... not shut off, exactly, but to put itself into a low-power state in which it looks as if it were off. And I've had a few situations where the OS or firmware was so borked up that the only way to restart a device was to physically plug the plug. So for a computer-controlled device that has the physical ability to act as a lethal weapon, I don't think it's unreasonable to insist on a manual "stop" override.

about a month ago
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The Evolution of Diet

tverbeek neo diet (281 comments)

The notion that we haven't had time to "evolve" to adapt to a modern diet is a bit absurd. Because here we are: eating it and living as much as a century on it. It doesn't take millions of years for natural selection to eliminate genetic lines that can't thrive on a particular diet; the mere thousands in which humans switched from hunter-gatherers into farmers has been enough. That doesn't mean that the rapid biotechnological change of the past century or two hasn't produced a diet that we can all do well on – high fructose corn syrup and factory-raised meat are putting a whole new set of selection criteria on H. sapiens – but the typical diet of the 19th century, with a corresponding level of physical activity, plus some modern medical technology to address illnesses that aren't related to nutrition, is the best prescription for human longevity.

about a month ago
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Securing the US Electrical Grid

tverbeek Re:INL working on these issues. (117 comments)

The US grid is "quite reliable"... by third-world standards. I live in a city of a quarter million, and my power goes out for 4-24 hours at least 3 or 4 times a year. Every thunderstorm that blows through leaves me wondering if I'm going to get to test the UPSes on my home servers again that day.

about a month ago
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Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

tverbeek Re:Is he a scientist? (179 comments)

So someone who's only been married to one person is unqualified to share their experiences about spousal relationships with young people? I have a cousin who just got married; I guess I should warn her that her parents (and grandparents) don't know anything about married life.

about a month ago
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Among Gamers, Adult Women Vastly Outnumber Teenage Boys

tverbeek uselessly broad definition (276 comments)

I have some games on my iPhone. There are a couple that I've spent a few dozen hours working my way through a few times, then put away. (e.g. "No, Human") There are a few I've played with a little, out of curiosity, but lost interest in. (e.g. "Super Monkey Ball") There are a couple more that I play once in a while when I'm bored and don't want to think. (e.g. "Trism")

Which doesn't make me a "gamer". The only console I've ever owned was an Atari, the last game I played on a screen larger than 3.5 inches was "Riven", and quite frankly I'd rather listen to someone talk about football (which bores me to tears, but at least I know how it works) than hear about whatever games they're playing. I'm sure I could find a common interest or two with many (maybe even most) gamers – perhaps political views, movies or comics or TV shows, hobbies or activities, etc – but they have nothing to do with the fact that I also have some games on my iPhone.

So if your definition of "gamer" is broad enough to include both me and "Call of Warcraft" players, you might as well just say "people" instead. (And pointing out that adult women outnumber teenage boys is not exactly an insightful or useful factoid.)

about a month ago
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Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

tverbeek Re:Is he a scientist? (179 comments)

Who called him a "scientist"? He's teaching a Business Administration class, not CS.

Who (other than the /. headline) implied he was being granted a professorship? TFA refers to him as "practitioner" who's being paired with an "academic scholar".

MBA programs routinely bring in people who may have no academic credentials but have real-world experience administering a business, because they provide valuable insight into the application of the principles that the academics lecture about. Even an ill-tempered in-over-his-head schmuck like Ballmer has knowledge that would benefit business students (e.g. all the mistakes he made).

So what's your problem with that?

about a month ago
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51% of Computer Users Share Passwords

tverbeek passwords on the device/session level, not app (117 comments)

Of course I leave the apps on my phone "logged in"; that's how they're supposed to work. Obviously this only makes sense if there's a password to access my phone (or on my account if the device supports them), but if not, it's the lack of password on my phone that marks me as a security-oblivious idiot, not the fact that I'm using the apps as they were designed to work.

about a month ago

Submissions

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Russians find "new bacteria" in Lake Vostok

tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  about a year and a half ago

tverbeek (457094) writes "Russian scientists believe they have found a wholly new type of bacteria in the mysterious subglacial Lake Vostok in Antarctica, the RIA Novosti news agency reported. "After putting aside all possible elements of contamination, DNA was found that did not coincide with any of the well-known types in the global database," he said. "We are calling this life form unclassified and unidentified.""
Link to Original Source
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Canadian charges against US manga reader dropped

tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  more than 2 years ago

tverbeek (457094) writes "The US-based Comic Book Legal Defense Fund and the Canada-based Comic Legends Legal Defense Fund have announced that the Canadian government has withdrawn all criminal charges in R. v. Matheson, a case which involved a US citizen who was arrested and faced criminal charges in Canada relating to manga found on his computer when he entered the country. Customs agents declared the illustrations of fictional characters to be "child pornography". The defendant, a 27-year-old comic book reader, amateur artist, and computer programmer, has been cleared of any criminal wrongdoing. Despite financial assistance from the CBLDF and CLLDF, he has an outstanding debt of $45K for his defense."
Link to Original Source
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HP reverses course on PCs

tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  more than 2 years ago

tverbeek (457094) writes "Not to be outdone by Netflix's bumpercar strategic planning, HP's current CEO has announced that they will not be divesting themselves of their Personal System Group, which makes some of the world's bestselling laptops and desktops. No word on what this means (if anything) for the fate of WebOS and its mobile devices."
Link to Original Source
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Spock gives up the con

tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  more than 2 years ago

tverbeek (457094) writes "Leonard Nimoy announced at the Creation Con in Chicago, celebrating the 45th anniversary of Star Trek, that this would be his last appearance at a Trek convention. He spoke for an hour, which at least suggests that he's making this move by choice and not out of necessity. He's 80 years old. "Live long and prosper," he told the crowd."
Link to Original Source
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Comics Code dead

tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  more than 3 years ago

tverbeek (457094) writes "After more than half a century of stifling the comic book industry, the Comics Code Authority is effectively dead. Created in response to Fredric Wertham's Seduction of the Innocent, one of the early think-of-the-children censorship campaigns, and Congressional hearings, the Code laid out a checklist of requirements and restrictions for comics to be distributed to newsstand vendors, effectively ensuring that in North America, only simplistic stories for children would be told using the medium of sequential art. It gradually lost many of its teeth, and an increasing number of publishers gave up on newsstand distribution and ignored the Code, but at the turn of the century the US's largest comics publishers still participated. Marvel quit it in 2001, in favor of self-applied ratings styled after the MPAA's and ESRB's. Last year Bongo (publishers of the Simpsons comics) quietly dropped out. Now DC and Archie, the last publishers willingly subjecting their books to approval, have announced that they're discontinuing their use of the CCA, with DC following Marvel's example, and Archie (which recently introduced an openly gay supporting character, something flatly forbidden by the original Code) carrying on under their own standards. The Code's cousins: the MPAA and ESRB ratings, the RIAA parental advisory, and the mishmash of warnings on TV shows still live on, but at least North American comics publishers are no longer subject to external censorship."
Link to Original Source
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Bill O'Reilly: science cannot explain the tides

tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  more than 3 years ago

tverbeek (457094) writes "David Silverman of the American Atheists was a guest on The O'Reilly Factor to talk about the billboards the AAG has put up recently, including one declaring the Christian Nativity story a myth. O'Reilly, playing to his home-field advantage, figured he could show up his guest by citing a daily miracle that proved the legitimacy of religion, a mystery beyond the ability of science to grasp: "The tide comes in and it goes out, Mr. Silverman," he lectured. "It always comes in, and always goes out. You can't explain that.""
Link to Original Source
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Big Blue Sun?

tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  more than 5 years ago

tverbeek writes "IBM is in talks with Sun Microsystems for a buyout. IBM would get Sun's hardware business and some substantial software (especially web and virtualization) expertise. Sun would get the financial support and the stability of being part of Big Blue. The merger would create a company with an increasingly attractive alternative to Wintel systems, with strong support for open-source technology."
Link to Original Source
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Majel Barrett Roddenberry Has Died

tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  more than 5 years ago

tverbeek writes "Majel Barrett Roddenberry, wife of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry, and the only person to appear — in one form or another — in every Trek TV series plus the movies, has died of complications from leukemia. She was 76. In addition to her ongoing involvement in Trek and its fandom, she produced her late husband's series Earth: Final Conflict and Andromeda, and made an appearance as a key character in an episode of "rival" series Babylon 5."
Link to Original Source
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Anti-Science political campaign launched

tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  about 6 years ago

tverbeek (457094) writes "MiCAUSE (Michigan Citizens Against Unrestricted Science & Experimention) — a political organization opposed to embryonic stem cell research on "moral" grounds — has launched a sneaky media campaign that pretends that the issue is the state's economy and taxes. Referring (without detail) to measures in states where stem cell research has not only been legalized, but also received investment funds, the TV ads claim that approval of Proposal 2 on the Michigan ballot this November wouuld not help the state's recessionary economy by stimulating the creation of jobs (on one of the few industries with growth potential in the Midwest), but would instead hurt the taxpaper by (somehow) forcing them to subsidize it."
Link to Original Source
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tverbeek tverbeek writes  |  more than 7 years ago

tverbeek (457094) writes "Good news and bad news on the RFID privacy front. The good news is that U.S. citizens may not need to carry an RFID-embedded passport just to cross the border with Canada. The bad news is that the driver's license you carry with you nearly everywhere would be embedded with an RFID chip instead. That's the scenario that's going to be tested in the state of Washington as a pilot program starting in January 2008, according to an article in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer . Washington is anticipating loads of border-crossing traffic for the 2010 Olympics in adjacent Vancouver BC, shortly after the federal passport requirement goes into effect in June 2009. The "enhanced" licenses would require applicants to submit to an in-person interview and show proof of citizenship to get one."

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