Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

New CFAA Could Subject Teens To Jail For Reading Online News

twiddlingbits Re:What's the First Amendment? (230 comments)

The GOP isnt in control of the Senate or the Executive Branch..have you been under a rock the last 5 yrs? Regardless, its Computer "stuff" something Congress as a whole (bioth partied) has no clue about so they'll probably passs it as the "good" in it outweighs the "evil" in it according to them. Educate your elected officials about this part of the bill and urge them to strike it out. I wonder what other easter eggs are buried in the fine print..:(

about a year and a half ago
top

Dell and HP To Sell Oracle Operating Systems

twiddlingbits Re:"Demonstrates..." (91 comments)

Craigslist is neither large nor busy. Try a stock brokerage for example or Wal-Mart inventory management systems that runs off POS data if you want large and fast. Oracle is an Enterprise class database and it's massive overkill and a waste of money to use it for small environments. Plus it doesn't HAVE to be a web site to need Oracle. Products like SAP and other systems that do a lot of data manipulation and/or calculations but are not used to drive a website also use Oracle. You can buy one copy of Oracle and set up as many different schemas that are essentially desperate databases as you want which makes it nice to "share" among different organizations. Yes, using Oracle can be PITA dealing with corporate Sales, the CEO, pricing models and to get it tuned but it does a very good job.

more than 4 years ago
top

To Ballmer, Grabbing iPad's Market Is 'Job One Urgency'

twiddlingbits Re:I don't get it. (764 comments)

All of those killed by a monopolist called Microsoft who COPIED the features, then made the packages dependent on the OS called Windows and just made it all available for cheap as part of a Suite called MS-Office. It didn't help that IBM bought Lotus and pretty much conceded the spreadsheet market to MS. Netscape never really went away, the original code base became the starting point for Mozilla when gave us Firefox which is faring pretty good vs IE.

more than 4 years ago
top

Stieg Larsson Is First Author To Sell 1M E-Books

twiddlingbits Re:It took this long? (122 comments)

Not any more...Top 50 downloads from Project Guttenberg...(note how many are "classics" published long ago where no one gets a cut) Top 100 EBooks yesterday 1. How to Analyze People on Sight by Elsie Lincoln Benedict and Ralph Paine Benedict (819) 2. The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana by Vatsyayana (802) 3. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (605) 4. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (468) 5. The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete by Leonardo da Vinci (389) 6. The Art of War by Sunzi 6th cent. B.C. (384) 7. Ulysses by James Joyce (371) 8. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (370) 9. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (303) 10. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas père (282) 11. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (270) 12. Dracula by Bram Stoker (266) 13. Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome by E.M. Berens (248) 14. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith (233) 15. The Prince by Niccolò Machiavelli (232) 16. The Bible, Old and New Testaments, King James Version (232) 17. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (226) 18. Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (223) 19. Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie (221) 20. The Black Watch by Joe Cassells (218) 21. War and Peace by graf Leo Tolstoy (218) 22. A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (216) 23. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain (211) 24. The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells (207) 25. Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases by Peter Mark Roget (201) 26. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë (199) 27. The Riddle of the Spinning Wheel by Mary E. Hanshew and Thomas W. Hanshew (197) 28. Grimm's Fairy Tales by Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm (193) 29. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells (191) 30. The Divine Comedy by Dante, Illustrated by Dante Alighieri (183) 31. The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie (182) 32. Walden by Henry David Thoreau (178) 33. Moby Dick, or, the whale by Herman Melville (177) 34. Emma by Jane Austen (169) 35. Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll (167) 36. Les Misérables by Victor Hugo (166) 37. Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift (166) 38. Cathedral Cities of Spain by W. W. Collins (164) 39. The Apricot Tree by Unknown (164) 40. The Riddle of the Night by Thomas W. Hanshew (162) 41. The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter (161) 42. The Republic by Plato (160) 43. Doctrina Christiana by Anonymous (159) 44. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare (157) 45. Paradise Lost by John Milton (150) 46. Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (150) 47. Encyclopedia of Needlework by Thérèse de Dillmont (148) 48. The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce (148) 49. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë (145) 50. Knots, Splices and Rope Work by A. Hyatt Verrill (143)

more than 4 years ago
top

Stieg Larsson Is First Author To Sell 1M E-Books

twiddlingbits Re:No "ideologies" to hold him back (122 comments)

If he was smart and planned well his "estate" which has been set aside for his kids, charity, etc. can certainly hold the rights and if there were instructions given as to what could/couldnt be done with his works they would follow them. JRR Tolkien has been dead a LONG time but his estate (managed by his son) negotiates all the rights for his works. That would subvert the "rape" you talk about (without giving any facts to back it up). It's a well know fact that SOME authors get very large fees for writing books. The Clintons come to mind as well as JK Rowling, they got millions. Of course I don't know if those $$$ were an advance against Sales Royalties or just a fee to produce the book. That's all super-secret.

more than 4 years ago
top

A $20 8-Bit Wikipedia Reader For Your TV

twiddlingbits Re:Noble but useless. (167 comments)

Even if it is $60 or 60 rupees, for double the cost you get one hell of a lot more utility!!! Plus the laptops can also access the Internet where it is available. IIRC, this thing you hook to the TV you need a PC to download then xfer to an SD card, unless of course they catch on and someone starts selling books on SD cards. With Kindles at $139 now, and laptops under $100 the cost vs utility of this device is poor.

more than 4 years ago
top

A $20 8-Bit Wikipedia Reader For Your TV

twiddlingbits Re:Noble but useless. (167 comments)

I seriously doubt that $35 claim on his device. If he sells it in the USA the requirements to make it "safe" will drive up the cost. Who even makes 8-bit microcontrollers? The last time I played with them was the Intel 8051 and 8031 in the early 1990s and they were hard to get then. The $35 laptop made in India for use in India..yea they can do that.

more than 4 years ago
top

A $20 8-Bit Wikipedia Reader For Your TV

twiddlingbits Re:Noble but useless. (167 comments)

Considering India just announced a $35 Linux laptop INCLUDING screen, memory and hard drive this product is overpriced and under capable. In the longer run the Linux laptop should be under $20. IThe laptop also allows the user to learn anywhere not just where the TV is located. I think most people would be OK carrying a laptop versus a TV. I would also think it takes less power for an LCD laptop than for a TV. Nice invention, only 10 yrs too late.

more than 4 years ago
top

NASA's Top 10 Space Junk Missions

twiddlingbits Re:Is this really a problem? (103 comments)

Approx. 8km/sec is the speed to keep something in LEO. It varies with the eccentricity of the orbit and the mass in relation to the body it is orbiting. 8km/sec is about .6mph/sec. With 3600 secs in 1 hr it's about 2100 mph. Objects in LEO have one hell of a lot of kinetic energy, a 1/10 kg object at 8km/sec would impart 3.2MJ of energy.which is about equal to about 1.5 sticks of dynamite energy displaced onto a stationary object. That much energy will tear up anything not armored against it and even then you need some seriously thick armor. Since weight is the enemy of spacecraft there is very little of that weight devoted to protection from impact. Even small objects like a nut or bolt will cause serious impact as It's not the mass it's the velocity that ramps up the impact. Don't forget that spacecraft are also moving in LEO so the velocity would double sending energy up by 4X. . In simpler terms if you put your McDs' quarter pounder into orbit you got a hell of a weapon of you can smash it into something.

more than 4 years ago
top

Heat Ray Gun Fails Final Test; Nixed From War

twiddlingbits Re:Final report (299 comments)

I don't think distance was the deal beaker. The vehicle based one I saw the other night on Discover/NatGeo/Science (I forgot which one) works at quite a distance up to several hundred meters (yards). But it does require a big vehicle with a large flat rotating vertical antenna and a good sized generator to reach that range. That makes it kind of hard to deploy in places like Afghanistan where the terrain can be very rough and enemies are hiding (someone has to be in the open for it to work). I also would wonder if rain/snow/dust would attenuate the beam or spread it reducing effectiveness. I could see a police department finding a use for controlling an unruly crowd but I can't see them being able to find the several millions needed to buy one.. Until it can be made man-portable or on something smaller (like a HUMVEE ) can be fired up quick and doesn't have a huge antenna it's just an interesting toy for the military.

more than 4 years ago
top

Intel Co-Founder Calls For Tax On Offshored Labor

twiddlingbits Re:Government is the problem, not the solution (565 comments)

Of course you like Obama's Socialist direction. Everyone of your responses is anti-capitalism and anti-free market. Unions broke the back of the old GM, or course now that the Gov't owns them and the unions love the Govt' who protects their excesses. And we the taxpayers get shafted picking up the benefits and bloated labor costs that can't be passed on to the consumer since that would price GM products out of the market. Healthcare is working pretty good like it is now. It's not perfect but no system ever is. You think costs are high now and your selections limited to doctors and procedures your insurer will pay for, wait till it gets under the Government Corporations pay a LOT of taxes. I guess you don't realize that your taxes taken from your paycheck are matched by the corporation before they are sent in, and corps pay tax on profits, property and on things they use like electricity? Sure they get to deduct them as expenses to offset sales but they are still taxes they paid. So even IF a company paid no Corporate Income Tax they still paid Taxes I think you BADLY mistake the Tea Party movement or else are taking the Democrat talking points. Tea Party is after restoring the BASIC foundations of the USA not some personal agenda that Candidate X has. (no I'm not a member). Any strong challenge that's a reasonable option to the two idiot parties in charge now is worth consdering.

more than 4 years ago
top

A Quantum Memory Storage Prototype

twiddlingbits Re:That's one cool car... (114 comments)

He has a 1984 DeLorean with the Mr Fusion rigged to power a miniature Liquid Nitrogen plant. Downside is the car can only do 87 MPH.

more than 4 years ago
top

A Quantum Memory Storage Prototype

twiddlingbits Re:Quantum communication? (114 comments)

Speed assumes distance divided by time. There is no time in this case. Look at the May issue of Scientific American. Physicists are starting to wonder if Time really exists in relation to certain states of matter. If time is removed as a variable, the Unified Theory may actually be possible with all this 10 dimensional stings stuff.

more than 4 years ago
top

A Quantum Memory Storage Prototype

twiddlingbits Re:So, no storage, but instant transmission? (114 comments)

As I understand quantum entanglement the state of the two electrons (photons) is instantly replicated to the other when a change occurs in one no matter the distance apart. However for this to happen the same "rest state" has to be present. You couldn't have Patten X in one and Patten Y in the other, and expect changes in X to be cause Y to be replaced with X..

more than 4 years ago
top

Open Source Complaint Against IBM Gets Support

twiddlingbits Re:Emulation/virtualization (250 comments)

Those Amdahl & Hitachi machines are still around in some places, but yes you can't buy new ones. But the statement that there is "no competition for mainframe workloads" is totally bogus. I can tell you that there is an excellent business in porting legacy code to distributed environments (linux/unix with X86 processors) for large legacy applications and even keeping the application in COBOL or moving them to .NET or Java. (http://www.tsri.com) As I said before the competition for the mainframe isn't really another mainframe. I used to work for IBM and our AIX group regularly positioned high end p-series boxes against mainframes and won. REALLY hacked of the z-series guys.. The term "monopoly" means there is NO competition even from surrogate goods. The anti-trust idea is a bust. If they couldn't outright win anti-trust against MS then no way you get IBM.

more than 4 years ago
top

Open Source Complaint Against IBM Gets Support

twiddlingbits Re:Emulation/virtualization (250 comments)

LOL.wow..what misdirection, Obama and you must have gone to the same school I've been here at Slashdot close to 10 yrs. I am NOT a current day attention seeking paid shill like you. I say it like it is. I have a top notch rating. It's YOU who are ignoring the facts. I guess the $$$ have blinded your eyes. You NEVER addressed my issues nor that of others. If you can't take the heat get out of the kitchen. Everyone has to make a living but I suspect if the devil himself came asking for your help with the right $$$ he would get it. Shoo, scram, go away, get lost, and DON'T COME BACK.

more than 4 years ago
top

Open Source Complaint Against IBM Gets Support

twiddlingbits Re:Emulation/virtualization (250 comments)

Guess you have never heard of Amdahl, Hitachi and several other systems that can run IBM Mainframe OSes. They have a small market share but 90% of a market is not a monopoly. Mainframe is NOT all about z/OS, CICS, etc. its about doing a LOT of work. With virtualization and 8-core CPUs mid-sized Linux/Unix servers are competing with the processing power of a mainframe. Your argument is baseless. Yes, memory for mainframes is expensive but it's NOT the same thing you put in your PC..not even close. Ever tried to buy memory for an HP Superdome? That can set you back $2M a GB. You are not only a paid shill, you are an idiot one at that.

more than 4 years ago
top

Open Source Complaint Against IBM Gets Support

twiddlingbits Re:Difference between IBM and Apple cases (250 comments)

OMG, this has not one bleeping thing to do with anti-trust. Where the Sam Hill did you come up with that idea? Present a case with some reasonable legal arguments not made up from thin air and people might respond more positively. The judge, the appeals court, Apple, IBM and many others would have a significantly different opinion about PyStar. The case is 99% the same. Your paid shilling isn't any more welcome here than it was at Groklaw. If I'm not mistaken, PJ banned you over there. I've never seen a ban here but you might be the precedent!

more than 4 years ago
top

Open Source Complaint Against IBM Gets Support

twiddlingbits Re:It's all about interoperability (250 comments)

Wrong. The courts in the USA have held in the Apple vs Pystar case that tying an OS to specific proprietary hardware is a perfectly legit business strategy as it creates a barrier to entry. Even if the EU goes the other way which I doubt IBM will win in the long run as it's about copyrights not about patents. In the lefter BM was foreshadowingg a 2nd line of defense that they could choose to take up if needed, they did NOT asserting it in any way. The letter was a warning shot. As we have seen in the SCO case, IBM WILL defend itself against baseless allegations affecting or potentially affecting it's business. IBM has the law and recent legal precedent on it's side, is diligent about keeping a case going and doesn't seem to mind waiting a few years for the courts to rule on a case. Hercules and NEON will likely be history in a few years so IBM can wait. Hercules (and NEON) were/are hoping to force some sort of compromise involving a low cost licensing agreement but it isn't going to happen. IBM isn't a firm that would license technology to someone who would use it to compete against one of it's most profitable business segments. The fact NEON has some cash doesn't faze IBM as the probably piss away that much money every year on trivial items.

more than 4 years ago
top

US Government Begins Largest IT Consolidation in History

twiddlingbits Re:Prediction (283 comments)

Umm..NO..the Gov't Agencies will still "manage" the contractor(s) into doing stupid things in order to save a few bucks or save political face for someone. And don't forget the CongressCritters who don't want DC's in their districts closed. Think the BRAC (DoD) process on a much larger scale of agencies and locations. Total freaking chaos. Looks great on paper, works pretty well in the private sector, but it will be a massive fustercluck in the Gov't.

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

twiddlingbits hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

twiddlingbits has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>