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Boeing and BlackBerry Making a Self-Destructing Phone

tysonedwards Secure & Android (37 comments)

Misnomers?

1 hour ago
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NASA Study Proposes Airships, Cloud Cities For Venus Exploration

tysonedwards Re: Makes me wonder (198 comments)

Infinitely is a long time span to design for. And frankly speaking the sun will expand engulfing Venus and this proposed probe well before the clock expires on Infinity.

3 days ago
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NASA Study Proposes Airships, Cloud Cities For Venus Exploration

tysonedwards Re: And Yet; (198 comments)

Pot Bellied Pigs fly quite regularly on commercial aircraft as "service animals" as do miniature chetlan ponies, for what it's worth! What a glorious day we live in thanks to the ADA! Some amazing breakthroughs in science must be coming any day now, right? Right?

3 days ago
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Apple Wins iTunes DRM Case

tysonedwards Re: Yes this is Terrible. (189 comments)

That again is also muddying the waters, considering that Apple established via their contracts with RIAA member companies that DRM was required for them to sell music online. The more appropriate question is whether their prevention of competitors DRM Schemes on the iPod drove up prices of either the music itself or the iPod devices upon which said digitally purchased tracks could be obtained. This would also seem to be an easier question to answer as it would allow for direct analysis of Apple's business model versus their competitors, or even the price jump experienced when their tracks went from $0.99 to $1.29.

3 days ago
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Vinyl Record Pressing Plants Struggle To Keep Up With Demand

tysonedwards Re: Not convincing at all (433 comments)

I have, yes. Both conducted and had them conducted on me, including some tricks from a music producer friend who would send the same track mastered identically and simply exported into different formats. It's only possible with active listening when the information is present in the actual file. I can't tell the difference between one 16bit track and another regardless of format (even 256kbps to 320kbps for most tracks), or a 24bit track that was mastered in 16 and then upconverted versus a strait 16bit track. Passive listening without looking for those "defects" or "differences", or without having a point of comparison between the two, you'd be very, very, very hard pressed to infer the differences with a percentage greater than random chance. Active listening, when you know what you're doing and have a lot of practice, and have the right equipment, the differences are apparent. Are they significant? Not really and in no way impact the enjoyment of the track, but there nonetheless and in a predictable fashion between masters across a variety of genres.

about a week ago
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Vinyl Record Pressing Plants Struggle To Keep Up With Demand

tysonedwards Re: Not convincing at all (433 comments)

I can certainly tell the difference between a FLAC 24bit sample and a MP3 320kbps with my theater setup, however that seems more of a comparison of 16 bit to 24bit mastered audio when using quality speakers and a good amplifier with a DSP supporting 24bit audio. Using a phone, I typically can't tell the difference between something streamed from Spotify and a FLAC 24bit, although that's probably speaking more to the DSP In the phone. Quality equipment and you can tell the difference in terms of recovery from extremes of different types of sound, maintaining amplitude in those recoveries, and not having "artifacts" from a master obviously intended for earbuds that simply aren't present in a 24bit master. Sort of like looking for macro blocking in an overly compressed 1080p video stream to point out which is the lower bitrate.

about a week ago
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Once Again, Baltimore Police Arrest a Person For Recording Them

tysonedwards Re: Fire all the officers? (515 comments)

In the case of Deputy Andrew Wood striking Milton Olin Jr with his patrol vehicle while texting his wife, yeah... He did blame the victim, and deny the texting, that he was speeding, and made further false statements, and attempted to destroy evidence. And no repercussions came his way. Eye witnessed and telemetry data from his vehicle even show that he was entirely at fault and drove directly into Mr. Olin when the road curved. That incident is from end of August, not 2007.

about a week ago
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Once Again, Baltimore Police Arrest a Person For Recording Them

tysonedwards Re:Fire all the officers? (515 comments)

By inverse, if *anyone else* did these acts, including but not limited to the destruction of property, harassment, assault and unlawful detainment, that person would be facing severe felony charges on multiple counts. The fact that the person has a badge and training... they should be held to a similar standard at least. They weren't carrying out their duties at the time of this incident, they freaked the fuck out and decided to harass someone because they could and knew that there would be no repercussions.

Considering your comments, would you too side with the cops who run people over in their cars while texting on their personal cell phones and then blame the victim for throwing themselves in front of their cars, all the while perjuring themselves as has also happened recently?

about a week ago
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Excuse Me While I Kiss This Guy: The Science of Misheard Song Lyrics

tysonedwards Anna Kendrick (244 comments)

You're gonna miss me by my taco.

about two weeks ago
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Civil Case Uses Fitbit Data To Disprove Insurance Fraud

tysonedwards Re: Privacy means local storage (99 comments)

Local storage on a phone - devices that are small, visible, portable and valuable have a considerable market and as such lead to thefts - is a single point of failure where you can lose everything. Further, the industry average is to replace these devices every 18 months. There are mitigating strategies such as backup and resync approaches, but these create additional steps and introduce the likelihood of users losing their data. Hence why the idea of server side storage exists, as a means of making these device replacements easier and more transparent to users.

Does that come with potential privacy issues? Of course it does, but largely the market decided that they would rather the convenience of a "dumb terminal" that can be replaced and immediately behave just like their old one than the security of a fully local model. Until there are massive security breaches that hit *most* people, where these approaches to cloud data storage is shown directly at fault (and not those visible to most, but largely affecting celebrities only as was the case with Fappening or other similar events) then this type of thinking will continue and new services introduced that are more and more Internet-centric for tasks that ultimately don't need to be.

about two weeks ago
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Why Apple, Google, and FB Have Their Own Programming Languages

tysonedwards Re: This isn't carpentry. (161 comments)

The NIH mentality and largely the spirit behind what open source is. Can some other tool do it with a new api or plugin and do 99.9% of what Hack, Go or Swift does? Probably. Does this concept of a new forked language or an entirely new solution prevent changes from going back upstream? Absolutely. But it enables those involved to take risks and to experiment with things that they may not have otherwise been willing to consider, and to spur ideas and innovation from others; maybe even helping to advance our state of technology a bit.

about two weeks ago
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Aliens Are Probably Everywhere, Just Not Anywhere Nearby

tysonedwards Re: Welcome to the Actual Universe (334 comments)

3 decimal places is pretty damn ridiculous! Best joke I've heard all week.

about two weeks ago
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Aliens Are Probably Everywhere, Just Not Anywhere Nearby

tysonedwards Re: Paradoxes Be Damned (334 comments)

The the further sake of argument, let's say that there was a desire for colonization. Civilizations here on Earth have historically expanded when there was an economic or strategic need to do so. They didn't simply find the most distant location and set up a new colony just because they felt like it. The new location would provide some key resource, be it food, water, land, access to trade, differing agriculture, minerals, tools, etc.

Further, space is quite vast. Even in our own galaxy, the distances are immense and the number of choices nearby that could prove interesting are themselves very large. If models regarding civilization growth and expansion could be inferred from our history as a base, it seems unreasonable to assume that a highly advanced civilization intent in colonization would invest the economic resources and risk the political or social resources to do so very distant to their own world when much closer, viable options are a possibility. Only when those options are exhausted and further growth is necessary to support a civilization's way of life would growth of one's boundaries become a consideration. This has held true through many societies regardless of cultural heritage, political systems or value systems, be it various Native American groups, the Inca Empire, the Roman Empire, the Huns, various Middle Eastern Groups and what can be inferred of the Homo Erectis lineage.

As such, is it really that unreasonable to assume that if faster than light travel were possible, it's use would be anything different than jet travel today and come with economic implications that themselves still require considerations even though the world itself became a "smaller" place thanks to their invention, and the domains afforded of travel simply became more time efficient and practical?

about two weeks ago
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Google, National Parks Partner To Let Girls Program White House Xmas Tree Lights

tysonedwards Re: Girls, girls, girls... (333 comments)

Because a girl has __never__ done anything obscene when given free reign over a public forum. ;)

/me grabs popcorn and waits for Morse Code messages, or pictures that can only be seen from particular angles or with long exposures.

about three weeks ago
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What Would Have Happened If Philae Were Nuclear Powered?

tysonedwards Re:I'm quite surprised it wasn't (523 comments)

And opposite the Nuke-leer hippies would be the group of Nuke-ular hippies standing off against each other, preparing for violence and devising ever more elaborate means of defense against their adversaries.

about a month ago
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Battlestar Galactica Creator Glen A. Larson Dead At 77

tysonedwards Insightful or Sloppy Editing? (186 comments)

Somehow, I doubt that the poster meant "Creato" in the italian sense, being the past tense of for Cresco, or to "produce, create, bring forth"...

about a month ago
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Ask Slashdot: Dealing With VoIP Fraud/Phishing Scams?

tysonedwards Re:Legitimate Marketing Traffic (159 comments)

Yes, because making new marketing materials, distributing updated business cards and getting everyone involved to stop using the old number and separate the old number from the company is *such* an easy task and can happen overnight!

The phone number of a presumably reputable business that parties would likely recognize for their Caller ID number is a social engineering trick to get around one of the roadblocks and make people subconsciously overcome one of their answers to why this is a scam. Any act at this point is damaging the brand of the business, whether they capitulate and change their number, or whether the scamming entity continues to portray themselves as the company in question.

Let's change this a little bit and put a name to these calls... What if instead of "unnamed company", it was "Google" that had someone using their corporate phone number to do these calls? What about "Amazon", or "Microsoft", or "Apple", or "Cisco", or the "FBI"? Would your opinion about "just change your phone number" be the same?

about a month ago
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Overbilled Customer Sues Time Warner Cable For False Advertising

tysonedwards Re:TWC are (surprise, surprise) crooks and thieves (223 comments)

This is actually a very reasonable idea, considering that in many jurisdictions the last mile deployments have been subsidized via government grants or guaranteed loans and bonds. The justification for these companies to apply for such money is that without the support of government, it would not be economically practical to provide service to various localities. By taking all last-mile deployments out of government hands, many of which simply have been ignored outside of big cities anyways, then individual cities could utilize funds from property taxes to provide the actual termination to each residence and business. Then, there can be the immediate possibility of competition of middle mile providers within these localities for those customers without such significant expense to them, effectively lowering costs for their customers.

Although on the flip side, we know full well that costs won't go down, even as responsibilities are split... It'll just be that everyone realizes "Oh, this is the biggest number that the vast majority of people are willing to pay today, so that is what we charge!" to which the market will naturally settle on a tacit understanding of multilateral screwing despite the new appearance of choice.

about a month ago
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Manslaughter Conviction Overturned For Scientists Who Didn't Predict Earthquake

tysonedwards Re:Blatantly wrong summary (139 comments)

That is ultimately the problem. Once things get to the point where the courts are involved, much like scientific debates depicted on television, they are reduced to 1 person for, and 1 person against, and are largely not representative of the consensus of the scientific community as a whole. The format combined with subject matter that most people choose not to attempt to understand creates the illusion that there is still cause for discussion on the matter and that one crackpot saying "I can predict big earthquakes, and so can you! Look at this data, there was all of these events going on for months, so why wouldn't they think that there was something going on in a seismically active region?" versus the 99 others saying "Here are 500 other instances where in this very city, these same conditions were present and absolutely nothing happened. If we alerted everyone, everywhere every time that there was a minor event based off of the potential that something *could* happen, there would be no credibility when at some point in the future we have adequate technology and understanding to predict these events!" And that is ultimately the problem, out of an emphasis of "fairness", both sides are given equal time and their information presented is gauged based off of which is more plausible for a layman to understand and are most compatible with their social biases and prejudices. It ceases to be about which side is right but rather which side is more likable and most compatible with the political and social viewpoints of the community.

about a month ago

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