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Comments

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CERN's Higgs Boson Discovery Passes Peer Review Publication Hurdle

ultracool Re:Physics Letters B?? (73 comments)

Different journals have different standards for the type of paper. For example, the format for Science and Nature articles tends to be less detailed and more focussed on the particular result obtained. Other journals are more suitable for more in-depth discussion of methods and their intricacies. Some of them, such as Physics Letters, promise rapid publication, whereas PRL etc., Science, and Nature can drag on for some time. Notice also that they have chosen to publish the papers open access, which not every journal allows. Impact factor isn't everything. And as another poster noted, there is a Science article in the works. Nothing fishy here.

more than 2 years ago
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Newt Gingrich's Amazon Book Reviews

ultracool Re:ZING! (275 comments)

QED does not have lots of pictures in it. Physics books for the layman tend to not have many pictures. Physics textbooks are much more equation-heavy than picture-heavy.

more than 3 years ago
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New Zealand Scientists Make Atom-Trapping Breakthrough

ultracool Re:Trying to understand this... (101 comments)

So this paper is about that very first step of actually making the qubits. One atom = one qubit. In this case, the "state" would likely be the atom's spin orientation. Spin and position are not connected by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Position and momentum are linked, as are energy and time.

more than 4 years ago
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New Zealand Scientists Make Atom-Trapping Breakthrough

ultracool Re:Trying to understand this... (101 comments)

I'm not really sure what your question is, but I'll try to answer it! To make a quantum computer, you need a number of qubits. If you want to use atoms as qubits, you need to be able to repeatably trap, hold, and interrogate them over "long" timescales. If you could only trap a single atom 50% of the time, your computer would be very inefficient if you have, say, 30 qubits (ie. an array of 30 single atoms). By pushing this up to 83%, efficiency improves dramatically. Also, they can probably do better than 83% by improving their vacuum, but this would require taking their apparatus apart somewhat, and is not something people tend to do once they have a working setup!

more than 4 years ago
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Oscilloscopes For Modern Engineers?

ultracool Re:Ebay (337 comments)

Yes, definitely ebay! Old analog scopes are just as good as digital scopes (in some cases preferable), but it depends on the application, and you can fix them if they break. If you need a really fast scope or want math functions, then you need a newer one. We have a few digital Tektronix scopes in the lab, and they are just fine. Also, what is handy with newer scopes is that they have USB ports so it's easy to save your data (if you need to).

more than 4 years ago
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Has Any Creative Work Failed Because of Piracy?

ultracool Re:Let the rationalizations begin (1115 comments)

Traditional musicians make money from performing concerts and giving lessons. Recordings are advertisement, not the main product.

more than 4 years ago
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Emmerich Plans Foundation As a 3D Epic

ultracool Re:Oh My God, THE Roland Emmerich?! (283 comments)

I thought ID4 was awesome when I saw it. But then I was also 12 at the time...

more than 4 years ago
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Programmable Quantum Computer Created

ultracool Re:How do they know? (132 comments)

The underlying quantum state *is* observable. Why wouldn't it be?

If you RTFA (and not even the paper is necessary for this), you will see that they are limited by the fidelity of their setup, ie. signal to noise. Hence, when they improve their apparatus, they will get more accurate results.

more than 4 years ago
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Do You Provide Tech Support To Friends and Family?

ultracool Re:feign ignorance... (606 comments)

But the internet is a series of tubes! You can't just dump things on it like a truck!

about 5 years ago
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Texting Toddlers, How Young is Too Young?

ultracool Re:when they are old enough to be unsupervised (286 comments)

My parents bought my sister a cell phone when she was 11 so they could keep track of her. There wasn't any issue of "responsible use". My dad tells her that she always needs to keep it with her and that's that. I think the other kids her age had to beg their parents for cell phones...

more than 5 years ago
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Ask Blizzard About Starcraft2, Diablo III, WoW, or Battle.net

ultracool Re:StarCraft II - LAN PLAY (520 comments)

I also would like plain LAN play for Diablo III. Where I live, internet is still fairly expensive and the data caps are not liberal. I want to be able to play the game with my friends at home without needing a net connection. I loved Diablo II for the LAN play. If Diablo III will have no LAN play, I won't buy it and would encourage others to boycott it also.

more than 5 years ago
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Finally, a True Green Laser

ultracool Re:Excellent story about excellent science. (274 comments)

As a person who works in a laser lab, I was very offended that existing green laser pointers were dubbed "fake". If anything, having a hand-held diode pumped solid state laser is way cooler than just a plain green laser diode.

more than 5 years ago
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How Common Is Scientific Misconduct?

ultracool Re:Of course they're not all honest (253 comments)

Usually what happens is that someone wants to build on another person's research or use their method for their own experiment. If they just can't get the method or experiment to work, questions will be raised, especially if multiple research groups can't get it to work.

more than 5 years ago
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What Did You Think Of The New Star Trek Movie?

ultracool Re:My biggest issue with the movie (SPOILERS) (592 comments)

The "science" in the entire movie was pretty WTF, not just the red matter. It's much more fantasy than science.

more than 5 years ago
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NY Bill Proposes Fat Tax On Games, DVDs, Junk Food

ultracool Re:Money Grab (793 comments)

Yeah! When I get into a game, I lose the desire to eat. I think fostering a gaming addiction would be a great way to lose weight because you stop caring about the outside world and your own bodily desires and functions.

more than 5 years ago
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When watching a movie, I like to add calories via ...

ultracool Re:Best is... (457 comments)

I go for strawberry Pocky. Man, I'm so glad that I'm not the only one who loves Pocky during a movie! Rather than buying popcorn and expensive candy at the movie theater, I go to the supermarket and get a packet of Pocky. It's easy to conceal and not noisy to eat.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Earth may have a second magnetic field

ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "FTA: Geophysicists in the US are proposing a new magnetic field generated in the Earth's core, the existence of which could help us understand why our planet's magnetic moment has flipped several times in the past. By measuring ancient field patterns frozen into the volcanic rocks of West Eifel in Germany and Tahiti in French Polynesia, Kenneth Hoffman of California Polytechnic University and Brad Singer of the University of Wisconsin-Madison have recorded the first data to suggest that the Earth's dipolar magnetic field is accompanied by a second magnetic field with a distinct origin in the Earth's core (Science 321 1800)."
Link to Original Source
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The physics arXiv blog

ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "If you are interested in the latest happenings in physcis, I would recommend checking out the the physics arXiv blog. It summarizes various general interest articles submitted to the arXiv for a broad (but physics-inclined) audience. From the about page:

'If ya'll been a-wundrin how physics is born, let me tell ya. It's just like your mammy and pappy told. The great white stork posts physics on the arXiv and leaves it a-cryin and a-hollerin until somebody starts a-lovin and a-nurturin it. If they do it just right-just right, mind-it'll one day grow up into a full force o' nature.

Ya'll can think of this lil ol blog as a kinda birth announcement where ya can see the little uns as soon as they arrive. Then ya'll can start a-cooin and a-cuddlin over the pertee ones.'"

Link to Original Source
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Patent Reform Act worries biotech companies

ultracool ultracool writes  |  about 7 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "Biotechnology companies are worried that the Patent Reform Act of 2007 is going to undermine their patents and remove incentive for them to develop innovative products.

FTA: (Nature subscription required)

"But drug and biotechnology firms — along with innovators in several other industries — often rely on fewer patents, and these tend to be the result of their own original work [compared to software companies]. Thus, they are more likely to sue for infringement than be sued. What's more, what look like minor advances on prior art in the drug industry can yield big advantages to patients."

Jim Greenwood, head of the Biotechnology Industry Organization in Washington DC, says "What Congress needs to do is improve the patent environment for all sectors of the American economy. You shouldn't have to throw the biotech industry under a bus to make life easier for the IT industry.""

Link to Original Source
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "Wellington Grey, a physics teacher in the UK and notable creator of the Slashdot flowchart and other flowcharts wrote an open letter to the AQA and Department for Education begging for his subject back. The physics GCSE questions have become vague, politicized, and even non-scientific. The course leaves students with an overall negative impression of science and almost no new understanding of physics."
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "When Dutch astronomer Willem de Sitter proposed a static model of the universe in the early 1900s, he was some 3 trillion years ahead of his time. Now, physicists Lawrence Krauss from Case Western Reserve University and Robert J. Scherrer from Vanderbilt University predict that trillions of years into the future, the information that currently allows us to understand how the universe expands will have disappeared over the visible horizon. What remains will be "an island universe" made from the Milky Way and its nearby galactic Local Group neighbors in an overwhelmingly dark void."
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "The problem with the internet is that the useful bits tended to be surrounded by useless and distracting bits. The Interclue browser add-on gives you the useful bits without the fluff, along with relevant metadata and one-click actions, all without leaving the page. So far it's available for Firefox, but they are working on IE, Opera, and Safari."
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "New solar cells developed by researchers at the Nanomaterials Research Centre at Massey University in New Zealand don't need direct sunlight to operate and use a patented range of dyes that can be impregnated in roofs, window glass and eventually even clothing to produce power. Researchers at the centre have developed the dyes from simple organic compounds closely related to those found in nature, where light-harvesting pigments are used by plants for photosynthesis."
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "The start-up of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN could be delayed (registration required) after three of the magnets used to focus and manipulate the accelerator's proton beams failed preliminary tests at CERN earlier this week. The magnets were built at Fermilab in the US, which announced the failure on its Web site. Although CERN has not yet issued a formal statement on the set-back, it looks increasingly unlikely that the LHC will come on-line this year as planned."
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "Alas, research that says gaming is good for you!

Researchers at the University of Rochester have shown that people who played action video games, such as Unreal Tournament, for a few hours a day over the course of a month improved by about 20 percent in their ability to identify letters presented in clutter — a visual acuity test similar to ones used in regular ophthalmology clinics. After just 30 hours, players showed a substantial increase in the spatial resolution of their vision, meaning they could see figures like those on an eye chart more clearly, even when other symbols crowded in."
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "From TFA: "Carbon dioxide released through the burning of fossil fuels is cooling the upper atmosphere (Science subscription required), says a group of physicists who believe that a coherent pattern of global climate change in Earth's upper atmosphere is emerging after more than 15 years of study and debate. Falling temperatures are also lowering the density of the upper atmosphere and causing it to contract towards Earth. This is good news for low-Earth-orbit satellites like the International Space Station, which are remaining in their orbits for longer because of reduced atmospheric drag."

Is this necessarily a good position to take? Rather than focusing on one of the few and far between benefits of climate change, shouldn't we be worried that the upper atmosphere is changing so drastically?
"
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "While the only permanent solution for human-driven global warming is developing renewable energy, a temporary hack to counteract possible abrupt climate change is to build a giant sunshade in space. The sunshade would be launched into space in small pieces by electromagnetic launchers over a decade, as conventional chemical rockets are too expensive and impractical. The sunshade could be developed and deployed in 25 years and would reduce the amount of sunlight reaching Earth by 2%, which is enough to balance heating due to doubling of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere."
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 8 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "Two separate research groups claim to have observed Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in quasiparticles at much higher temperatures than atomic BEC — one at 19 Kelvin and the other at room temperature. The 19 K BEC was composed of half-matter, half-light quasi-particles called polaritons, and the room temperature condensate was composed of "magnons" (packets of magnetic energy). There is some skepticism among physicists as to whether these really are BECs. If they are true BECs, these experiments are the first evidence of them in the solid state."
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 8 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "An international research team led by Prof. Michael Kramer of the University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory, UK, has used three years of observations of the "double pulsar", a unique pair of natural stellar clocks which they discovered in 2003, to prove that Einstein's theory of general relativity — the theory of gravity that displaced Newton's — is correct to within a staggering 0.05%. Their results are published on the 14th September in the journal Science (subscription required for full text) and are based on measurements of an effect called the Shapiro Delay."
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ultracool ultracool writes  |  more than 8 years ago

ultracool (883965) writes "In a finding sure to cause controversy, scientists at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) found a lack of evidence of shadows from "nearby" clusters of galaxies using new, highly accurate measurements of the cosmic microwave background (WMAP). Other groups have previously reported seeing this type of shadows in the microwave background. Those studies, however, did not use data from WMAP, which was designed and built specifically to study the cosmic microwave background."

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