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Windows XP Falls Below 25% Market Share, Windows 8 Drops Slightly

unixisc Re:People hear "Windows 8" and run away (336 comments)

If you piss around with Windows 8 for a while, you can basically simulate Windows 7. But for a long time, you'll still bump into horrible garbage - like "you wanted a weird, functionless fullscreen app to view an image file, right"? Very few things are real showstoppers, but lots of stuff is just a little worse - like they abandoned all the little refinements they've made to progressive versions over the years. Little stuff, like the behavior of the "run" dialog. It used to autocomplete well, and seemed to usually know what you wanted. Now it doesn't.

My job has me doing development on a Windows 8 machine - and it's gotten down to very few times a day I say "oh God, really?", but it's taken a lot of tweaking and adapting to get there. And there's literally nothing I actually prefer about 8. Lots of it just evidences horrible testing/design. Like your default start screen has a tile for the "math input editor" or something. That's a very narrow niche app for a desktop, non-touchscreen computer, and it doesn't work the way anyone expects. Many times I've been asked "what the heck does this do?" - and it actually took me a while to figure out. Obviously that doesn't hurt anyone much to have a stupid, useless app - but the same lack of design pervades the whole product.

It's just a half-baked mess, and I think it's earned it's poor reputation very well.

The fullscreen apps that you mention is one more thing that got me. Even if you go into the Aero desktop, you have just 1. Every app on the PC wants the full screen. I can understand this behavior or phones or on tablets, where fingers would work differently from mice. However, importing those uses to PCs just to try & kick start that market is inane.

Like I said elsewhere in this thread, making it pretend that it's my Nokia Lumia did nothing for me. Despite owning 1 of the latter, I just found the use frustrating. Ever since I dumped it for a more traditional (non-Windows) desktop, my life has been a lot easier. Granted - all I use at home are Thunderbird, Browsers (both Chromium & Firefox) and FreeCiv.

about three weeks ago
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Windows XP Falls Below 25% Market Share, Windows 8 Drops Slightly

unixisc Re:New Improved XP 2.0 (336 comments)

This doesn't make sense: the legacy interfaces are the installed base for which Microsoft has a market in the first place. They are an aspect of the product that their customers like. Companies like Cigna or BofA or 21st Century or Disney are not in the business of having their employees change their computing habits every few years. So if the applications they are using do not require touchscreens, why force it on them? The applications won't have any use for Metro unless there is something about touch screens that they can use. For instance, ATMs, which would do fine w/ a Metro interface to the OS.

I agree that upstream, since Intel is changing the architecture of their CPUs, Microsoft needs to do something that makes it a good idea, say, for someone to prefer a Core i3 to an Atom. But that's something Microsoft can do w/ the underlying architecture - like moving to a more microkernel like OS, having different 'personalities' on top of those, allowing multiple virtual desktops (like KDE) and so on. But at the user level, they should change as little as possible. It's not their job to disrupt the operations of their customers, or else, before they know it, they won't have any. Rather, design the OS and future versions of the applications so that they take advantages of the newer features. At the OS level, maybe, make VMs of previous models the default for people who have ancient CDs they just have to run.

about three weeks ago
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Windows XP Falls Below 25% Market Share, Windows 8 Drops Slightly

unixisc Re:*BSD is dead, Netcraft confirms it! (336 comments)

I just switched to PC-BSD a few weeks ago, and have been largely enjoying it since.

about three weeks ago
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Windows XP Falls Below 25% Market Share, Windows 8 Drops Slightly

unixisc Re:New Improved XP 2.0 (336 comments)

It ain't a mere question of being cheap. It's a question of overhauling existing setups, particularly in offices, where the implications are work disruptions & worse. If it was just a question of paying MS the $200 or whatever it costs, it's one thing. But coming along w/ that would be all the migration pains. Plus Windows Vista & beyond were built on a win64 subsystem, and there are a lot of XP applications that companies didn't or can't upgrade, which would not run on 7 w/o either XP-Mode or Hyper-V.

I do think Microsoft should consider a model where they sell improved kernels, w/ whatever UI customers want - be it Metro, Aero, XP or classic NT. After all, 8 is better under the hood, if the UI could be the same as before. Maybe in installation, give users a choice of interfaces - making the newest the default but traditional UIs optional, so that it can be adapted by businesses w/ minimal disruptions.

about three weeks ago
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Windows XP Falls Below 25% Market Share, Windows 8 Drops Slightly

unixisc Re:What Classic Shell doesn't resolve (336 comments)

The last straws for windows 8.1 was the charms bar, and a weather app you didn't need, but apparently network support is only a "nice to have"? Get real.

Wi-Fi support is nice to have. I do have Network support, it's there via my Ethernet. Not ideal, but functional. As for touchpad, I have tried disabling it in both Windows 8, and on a different laptop, in Windows 7. Didn't work - needed Touchfreeze. Reason I complained about Weather is that Windows 8 is the first OS that wants to know my location. I don't want it to be Windows Phone 8, iOS or Android.

I can see how Notepad is useful on both phones & laptops. I can't see the same about Contacts. Rather, they could have just made Skype the platform for sharing contacts b/w phone & laptop, assuming that it's needed.

about three weeks ago
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Windows XP Falls Below 25% Market Share, Windows 8 Drops Slightly

unixisc What Classic Shell doesn't resolve (336 comments)

I bought a laptop soon after 8 came out. Of course, I hated the tiles... and installed classic shell and told it to boot to the desktop. After that, I don't understand what all the complaining is about. When I finally, after over 10 years, rebuilt my desktop a couple of months ago, and XP was retired (I had XP Pro), I got 8.1 Pro... installed classic shell, and don't understand what all the complaining is about.

Sure, 95% of the time I'm using Linux anyway, but I installed 8.1, the software I use to do work when I have to write stuff for Windows, and I don't understand what all the complaining is about.

My experience... again, after installing classic shell, is much like 7, only smoother and a few different ways to access certain things (like control panel) that you rarely use anyway... and it's not worse, it's just different.

So the only complaint really is that you need to install something like classic shell, but since I need to spend time customizing out of the box linux distributions, too, I fail to see the problem.

I'm serious... I really want someone to explain to me why they think Windows 8/8.1 is so bad (once you get rid of the tiles/apps paradigm by using classic shell and going straight to desktop). I'm not a Windows fanboy, I'm writing this on Linux, and mainly use Linux out of choice... but it seems to me people are just jumping on the hate bandwagon for anything new. I get that desktop and tablet experiences are different, and companies (not just MS) should stop trying to force feed us a single UI paradigm for all platforms... it doesn't work, but like the last few versions of Ubuntu, if you don't like it, you can tweak it to where it works for you.

Please refrain from feigning pity for "Joe User" that can't figure these things out for themselves... that's not who any of us here are, and most of us have little sympathy for Joe User otherwise.

I bought a new laptop recently that was preloaded w/ Windows 8.1. Installed Classic Shell. Here's what the problems were

  1. 1. Unlike previous versions, in this OS, you have to have a hotmail/live/outlook.com account to do the first step - logging in. Something that wasn't required in Windows 7. I had a Nokia Lumia Phone previously and had no issues w/ that, but the requirements are different. In Windows Phone 8, having that profile enabled me to just transfer everything to a new phone if needed. Here, I just don't get the point, aside from being annoying
  2. 2. The apps ain't much different either. Contacts - w/ phone#, just like in Windows Phone? Are they retarted - this is a PC. Yeah, one can Skype, but there's a separate Skype app for that. Doesn't need a separate Contacts list
  3. 3. Weather - see #2. On a phone, it makes sense. On this, how is it any better than the sidebar that Vista had? Oh, and now PCs/laptops, like phones, want my permission to determine my location. Naah-ah!!!
  4. 4. When you do log into Windows, you are confronted w/ the Metro screen. Yeah, you can install Classic shell, like I did, but that won't change that. What it does it that whenever you open an app, it goes into the desktop mode, but whenever you press the Windows button, it brings up that shell again
  5. 5. For me, the last straw was that my palms would rest on the trackpad, and while typing, sometimes the charms bar on the right would pop up, along w/ a network panel somewhere in the south west of my screen, inviting me to enable the wi-fi or whatever. It's irritating if you are in the middle of something else & are forced to tap the trackpad to get rid of it

Following this, I decided to bite the bullet and install PC-BSD, a DVD of which I had gotten some days ago. I initially had some issues, since it wouldn't recognize either my mouse nor the wi-fi. So I had to get another mouse, and an ethernet cable, and then disable UEFI, and then install it. I had some rough edges w/ LXDE and KDE, but now am pretty happy working w/ Lumina. Of course, I'd be happier once FreeBSD/PC-BSD supports Wi-Fi on this laptop. Typing however is a charm, since PC-BSD doesn't recognize the trackpad, so it never comes in the way and I don't need touchfreeze or anything like it.

about three weeks ago
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Oracle Offers Custom Intel Chips and Unanticipated Costs

unixisc Re:Sales flow chart. (97 comments)

I don't disagree with you, but I'll also add that there are some kinds of environments which need a huge DB like Oracle.

Because, let's face it, SQL server doesn't really scale up to the same level of performance, no matter what anybody tells you.

If you're big enough that nothing but Oracle will do, this is the cost of doing business.

If you believe SQL Server actually provides Enterprise class solutions ... well, you aren't very well informed. It simply doesn't handle stuff on the really big end of things.

Not saying that Oracle aren't greedy bastards who gouge their customers, but sometimes you really do need a bigger environment.

So doesn't Oracle's SPARC/Solaris line already cover this?

about three weeks ago
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Switching From Microsoft Office To LibreOffice Saves Toulouse 1 Million Euros

unixisc Re:sure, works for France (296 comments)

He took a 20% pay cut, which sounds like a pro-rated cut in lieu of the extra day off. I don't see how his employer is any worse off: if anything, they get to save 20% of his salary, while he gets to enjoy 3 days off. A win-win situation.

about three weeks ago
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Switching From Microsoft Office To LibreOffice Saves Toulouse 1 Million Euros

unixisc Re:sure, works for France (296 comments)

In the case of Munich, a whole new Linux distro was created - LiMux. But here, the French could get back to what was once a great Linux distro - Mandrake. They could use either Mandriva or Mageia, and go from there. I doubt that either of those 2 would have deteriorated as far as internationalization goes.

about a month ago
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Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

unixisc Re:I have a Miix 2 11.6" (125 comments)

I don't think Windows would dethrone either iOS or Android by copying them. People are not gonna buy Microsoft just b'cos they're like Android.

Microsoft had a unique selling point that they could offer a tablet that could potentially run the vast legacy of Windows apps to date. So let's say someone bought something like a Visio, or a Acrobat that they would have liked to have been able to use w/ their tablet, either the same way (w/ an attached or wireless keyboard) or an enhanced tablet experience (if the underlying OS could modify the way the application worked w/ the new input types). Then one could have said that there is value added.

But just trying to come up w/ a better phone interface, and in the process, totally screwing up a much loved interface that people had grown used to over the last ~20 years was no way to do it. Even for people who were comfortable w/ both, there is something seriously lacking in Windows 8

about a month ago
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Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

unixisc Re:Does it run Linux? (125 comments)

I just wish there was a way that I could still boot into UEFI while running PC-BSD/Linux/whatever. Right now, I have it disabled, and enabled the legacy boot. But it's nice to be able to boot from USB sticks

about a month ago
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Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

unixisc A tale of 2 Windows (125 comments)

I don't quite get you. I've used Windows 8 in 2 environments - a Lumia and the laptop that I described above. In fact, I used the phone first. The experience of the 2 was totally different.

I had a Lumia 520, which I loved. OneNote alone demonstrated to me how handy that phone was - I could make shopping lists that I never forgot, or travel plans. Nokia's HERE was perfect for finding places. Above all, the typing experience on a Lumia was superior to both that of an iPhone as well as an Android. I currently have an iPhone and a Kindle - a Verizon deal that I got that included both - and while I like both of them, the typing on them ain't as smooth as the Lumia was. Also, Lumia's touch experience was fantastic - the entire phone seemed to vibrate when you touched it. Anyway, those 2, plus a few more apps - things like unit converters, currency converters and some other utilities really made that phone handy. I gave that as a gift to my neice before my job brought me back to the US.

Now, as I described above, I bought a new Dell Inspiron 17. It had a keyboard wide enough like the old classic keyboards, complete w/ a backlit numeric keypad. The trackpad is huge. As described above, I started using it out of the box. The first thing that I saw ticked me off. Unlike in Windows 7 or XP or 95, it forced me to either log into a Microsoft account (Hotmail/Live/Outlook) or create one - something I never had to do previously. Since I already had my Live account from my phone, I just used that and got in.

That was just the beginning. The Windows Start button threw up a lot of icons, and I used a few which I had used on the phone, like Contacts. Do these morons really think that everybody will use their laptops to make calls? One only has Skype sessions when needed. Otherwise, if I want to see my relatives, I use FaceTime. Even the other apps - like the news - has preselected channels, and doesn't let you exclude all and just use the websites you like. My other grudge.

I then decided to play about w/ their App Store. I downloaded their version of FreeCiv, one of my favorite games. Boy, does it suck - the native Windows 8 version! Yeah, yeah, I know, the Android version on my tablet sucked as well, which is why I deleted it, and I did the same w/ the one I got from the Windows 8 store, instead going to the FreeCiv website and downloading it. Then played w/ it a bit.

However, both when I was playing, as well as when I was working, the charms bar would sometimes appear w/o warning, sometimes threatening to totally disrupt my work. I had had enough. I painstakingly sat down one weekend, put in the PC-BSD disk and finally, deleted the Windows 8 partition from the laptop. I was done.

In short, Windows Phone 8.1 is great. Only shortcoming - a market one - is the lack of apps like the Apple or the Play Store. But aside from that, if you don't have to have the latest & greatest games, then Windows Phone 8.1 is great. However, even if you have that experience w/ the phone and go to a PC/laptop, w/ experiences of both Windows 7 in the past, and Windows Phone 8.1, you'll find that Windows 8.1 still sucks. (Granted, I had a non-touch screen, but guess what? When I pay $800 for a toy, I really don't want to smidge the screen. My kindle already looks pretty bad, despite having a screenguard.)

On a tablet, I suppose Windows 8.1 could be okay, if you are not forced to deal w/ crippled apps from the store, but manage to use original applications written for Windows 7 and installed via disk or zipped files.

about a month ago
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Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

unixisc I converted it to PC-BSD (125 comments)

I halted buying of Windows 8x machines through lack of interest as well. That and disgust at how diabolical the UI is.

I bought a Windows 8 laptop as well - a rather large Dell Inspiron 17. One w/ a Core i7, 8GB of RAM, 1TB of hard disk. Installed Classic shell & tried it out. Problem was that even when I went into the desktop and was working on an application there, the Charms bar would just pop out of nowhere. Also, despite being the latest & greatest, from the Metro screen, there was no way of starting multiple desktops, each w/ 1-2 apps, so that I could avoid clutter. Oh, and also, the trackpad was getting in my way.

Finally, I took the trouble of trying to Install PC-BSD. At first, the UEFI kept ensuring that it kept going to Windows only, so finally I hit F2 and disabled UEFI. The first few times, the PC-BSD seemed to be in a permanent loop, but after hitting F12 to select the boot from device and selecting the DVD, the installation happened. Unfortunately, it failed to recognize the Wi-Fi, so I had to keep it connected to the router w/ the ethernet cable. Also, adding another user was tricky, and PC-BSD doesn't install root as a loggable user, despite prompting one to create a root password during install. So addition of another user had to be done via the CLI.

Finally, I had the thing completely set up w/ PC-BSD. It does what I need, so I'm liking it. Yeah, it has some rough edges, but nowhere near as ugly as Windows 8. Also, I'm using Lumina - KDE still has Akonadi running in the background, and sometimes KLaunch doesn't work, whereby the Logout doesn't work.

So for now, PC-BSD and Lumina is it for me.

about a month ago
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People Who Claim To Worry About Climate Change Don't Cut Energy Use

unixisc Re:This is just how people are. (710 comments)

But if animals ain't gonna be eaten, why're they made up of meat?

about a month ago
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People Who Claim To Worry About Climate Change Don't Cut Energy Use

unixisc Re:Wind? Solar? (710 comments)

Precisely! Wind & Solar are good for low power devices, but for heavy duty applications, such as air-conditioning or transportation, it's just the dirty fuels for now, and nuclear whenever it's ready (as in the environmental wackos not opposing it)

As for the headline, I'm one of those who don't cut energy use. But then again, I'm not concerned about global warming - so I duck the 'hypocrite' label, and instead embrace the 'callous' one

about a month ago
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Leaked Build of Windows 9 Shows Start Menu Return

unixisc Re:Microsoft is wasting people's time (346 comments)

There was a time I loathed UNIX, but Microsoft letting down their RISC platforms (Alpha & MIPS), and most recently, the forced Windows 8 UI change drove me to this. Yeah, I could have gone Linux, but had issues w/ it in the past.

about a month ago
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OpenWRT 14.07 RC1 Supports Native IPv6, Procd Init System

unixisc Re:Something is broken (71 comments)

On SSL, they now have the choice of SSL or LibreSSL. If they wait long enough, they'll also have LibreUnicode and LibreIPv6 to choose from as well

about a month ago
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Leaked Build of Windows 9 Shows Start Menu Return

unixisc Re:Fuck Tiles! (346 comments)

The sizes come in 3 sizes for some icons, and 2 for others. There is no way I can reduce the size of the tiles to be really small squares that I can just line up on one side. Yeah, same was true of icons, but at least they were small enough.

Other thing - I did install classic shell, but classic shell doesn't get rid of the accidental charms bar on your right popping up accidentally either if your cursor goes too far right, or sometimes, for no reason at all. It was frustrating working w/ it. I finally bit the bullet - had a PC-BSD CD that I had picked up from LinuxFest a few weeks ago. With some difficulty, installed it, and now Windows 8.1 is a thing of the past on my laptop. Am ironing out some rough edges, but otherwise, it works fine for what I do - e-mails, web browsing and FreeCiv.

about a month ago
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OpenWRT 14.07 RC1 Supports Native IPv6, Procd Init System

unixisc Re:Something is broken (71 comments)

Slashdot doesn't have IPv6 support, for whatever reason

about a month ago
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Chinese Couple Sells Children To Support Online Game Addiction

unixisc Re:I sold mine too! (131 comments)

Could be a new source of income

  1. 1. Buy a bunch of online games
  2. 2. Kick up huge debt
  3. 3. Sell kid to traffickers
  4. 4. Pay off debt
  5. 5. Impregnate wife again
  6. 6. GOTO 1

about a month ago

Submissions

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GNU Guix 0.4 released

unixisc unixisc writes  |  about a year ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "From: Ludovic Courtès

We are pleased to celebrate GNU’s 30th anniversary with the release of
GNU Guix version 0.4, representing 300 commits by 5 people over 2
months.

This release comes with a QEMU virtual machine image that demonstrates
preliminary work toward building a stand-alone GNU system with Guix.
The image uses the GNU Linux-Libre kernel and the GNU dmd init system.
It is console-only, and may be used primarily to try out Guix."

Link to Original Source
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NetBSD 5.1.2 announced

unixisc unixisc writes  |  more than 2 years ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "Soren Jacobsen has announced the release of NetBSD 5.1.2: "The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce that version 5.1.2 of the NetBSD operating system is now available. NetBSD 5.1.2 is the second critical/security update of the NetBSD 5.1 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed critical for security or stability reasons. Please note that all fixes in critical/security updates (i.e., NetBSD 5.0.1, 5.0.2, etc.) are cumulative, so the latest update contains all such fixes since the corresponding minor release. These fixes will also appear in future minor releases (i.e., NetBSD 5.1, 5.2, etc.), together with other less-critical fixes and feature enhancements. NetBSD 5.1.2 is dedicated to the memory of Yoshihiro Masuda, who passed away in May 2011."
Link to Original Source
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IPv6-handling flaw found in Windows 7

unixisc unixisc writes  |  about 3 years ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "I don't see how MS can claim that exploiting the vulnerability requires local network access, when the very nature of IPv6 will give everybody a globally routeable access, which would be reachable anyway. If they have the fix, it needs to be made available, since in IPv6, every node would have to be secured with an appropriate firewall and malware."
Link to Original Source
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AT&T plans for all networks to be on IPv6 by 2

unixisc unixisc writes  |  about 3 years ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "US NETWORK OPERATOR AT&T believes that by 2020 most networks should have completely moved onto IPv6.
AT&T, like all major network providers, has been banging on about IPv6 for many years but with the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses earlier this year the looming change over was brought into sharp focus. The plan in the short term is to run 'dual stack' networks, meaning running the current IPv4 network and the next generation IPv6 network side-by-side, however according to a report by AT&T that will only continue until 2020."

Link to Original Source

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