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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:About time! (279 comments)

The only reason for DS-lite, as I understand it, is to provide services for IPv4, which can't happen w/o NAT. That's the simple fact - the moment you try to support IPv4 @ all, NAT is involved. What DS-lite makes different is that the external connection is an IPv6 public address, eliminating the need for that network to have a public IPv4 address (which in a depleted world is just not there) and just using private addresses for nodes that absolutely must be IPv4

If a customer wants inbound connections w/ IPv4, they are out of luck once IPv4 depletes - NAT can't achieve that w/o going higher than Layer 3. So such customers would do well to embrace IPv6 as well, and only use IPv4 for downstream IPv4 connections.

Frankly speaking, since the ISPs would prefer an IPv6 switchover due to the ease of use & administration, what are the stopping points? Can't be the general customers - all the mainstream OSs - Windows 7/8.x/Phone 8, OS-X, Linux, BSDs, Android, iOS, et al support IPv6, and can be enabled automatically, if that happens to be the connection. It's either the ISPs outdated equipment, which may not support it, or it may be websites that are still IPv4 only. For the last, what are the favorite OSs of web servers? How many of those are not IPv6 capable? Again, a similar list - Windows Server 2008/12, Linux, BSDs are what are used: how many web servers are still on Tru64 or Irix or UNIXWARE? So web servers that are still on IPv4 are there b'cos their Admins either didn't bother making them dual stacked, or didn't know how. Yeah, it would be nice to have more people know how to deploy IPv6 on their networks, but I'd argue that except for some dated equipment, there is no reason that most gear can't be updated to support IPv6 (via routing tools like OpenWRT, pFsense, Tomato, et al)

9 hours ago
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:About time! (279 comments)

B'cos it doesn't make sense to mix protocols. Both private & public IPs may be needed, but that issue should be independent of whether IPv6 is preferred to IPv4

9 hours ago
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:About time! (279 comments)

Since when is a link-local address the same as a loopback address?

10 hours ago
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Lumina: PC-BSD's Own Desktop Environment

unixisc Re:Start a new DE (131 comments)

Why not build the ultimate DE? One that has a GTK+ version of every Qt app and vice versa? Maybe even multiple versions? Something that looks like a cross b/w GNOME 3 and Metro? Something that requires systemd? Something that supports every shell known to UNIX man - ash, bash, csh, dsh....zsh? Every emacs version supported. Vi, vim, elvis, pelvis, everything. Oh, and toss in compatibility w/ AfterStep

10 hours ago
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Lumina: PC-BSD's Own Desktop Environment

unixisc Re:Anyone knows how it would compare to razor-qt ? (131 comments)

But the PC-BSD team could still take the last non-LXDE version of Razor-qt and run w/ it. Why not start w/ that, instead of building a new DE from scratch? And if they do have to build a new DE, why not something like Etoille, or something else based on GNUSTEP?

10 hours ago
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Lumina: PC-BSD's Own Desktop Environment

unixisc Re:Anyone knows how it would compare to razor-qt ? (131 comments)

I was wondering this as well. When Razor-qt already exists, why don't they just take that and run w/ it? Is it just a licensing issue? Or something else?

11 hours ago
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:It didn't matter whether it was last year or ne (279 comments)

Like I said elsewhere in this page, even if ISPs implement IPv6, they'll still need their IPv4 addresses for dual-stack connections, which will be needed as long as a majority of the customers are IPv4.

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:Wasn't allocation always the problem? (279 comments)

Not just that, w/ IPv6 and say, a /48, or even a /56, a university can support all the colleges and academic teams and whatever other combination they have, put them all on adjacent networks and have them all on a common Internet2 node. Speaking of which, is Internet2 going IPv6 anytime soon?

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:And yet Akamai deserves a /10 (279 comments)

Can't you get provider independent /32 or/24? /22 seems a lot even for an organization that uses several ISPs in several countries

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:About time! (279 comments)

Windows Server 2008 and 2012 has IPv6 as their native IP, as does Vista onwards. It's XP which is IPv4 only

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:About time! (279 comments)

Those addresses were allocated @ a time when the only use of the internet was supposed to be the Pentagon, and organizations it dealt with within & outside the US. That's why the initial blocks that were assigned were Class A blocks to organizations like IBM, DEC, HP, GE, Ford, MIP, Stanford, et al. Nobody imagined that Billy Joe Blow in Podunk, XX would be on it. Also, IPv4 was an experimental protocol: IPv6 is the protocol that the IETF had meant to go into production.

Since even the slightest change to IP address lengths - even changing them from 32-bit to 33-bit would have meant having to change every network on the planet, the IETF decided that given the scope, every conceived improvement should be built into it. Some materialized, while some, such as fewer routes didn't, since the Internet ain't hierarchical. But all in all, IPv6 has solved a lot of things.

The only 'disadvantage' of IPv6 is that most of the world has yet to convert to it.

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:About time! (279 comments)

But most networks don't use either static or dynamic NATs: they use something called Port Address Translation (PAT), and that one prefers a pool of public addresses so that a single public address doesn't have too much of a load. Once one uses that, the effect of NAT is diluted by a few orders of magnitude, depending on the #public addresses thrown @ it.

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:About time! (279 comments)

But ain't that what DS-lite is about? You set up things on a IPv6 network, and for clients that are IPv4 and need to access your service, you set up an LSNAT @ their end of the connection. Up to their router, the traffic is IPv6, and their router then NATs it to a local IPv4 address of theirs on the network. They are then good to go.

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:About time! (279 comments)

But what would you have gained w/ the loopback being /64 rather than /128? Also, why was loopback a Class A block in IPv4?

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

unixisc Re:About time! (279 comments)

Without looking, what is your static IPv6 address? ;)

Do I need to know? If yeah, I'd use DHCPv6 to have it manually assigned. And if I'm manually assigning it, the Interface ID, or the host address part of the address I can make as simple as possible, such as [Global Prefix]::b00b

If not, I'd just let ND pick an address.

yesterday

Submissions

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GNU Guix 0.4 released

unixisc unixisc writes  |  about 7 months ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "From: Ludovic Courtès

We are pleased to celebrate GNU’s 30th anniversary with the release of
GNU Guix version 0.4, representing 300 commits by 5 people over 2
months.

This release comes with a QEMU virtual machine image that demonstrates
preliminary work toward building a stand-alone GNU system with Guix.
The image uses the GNU Linux-Libre kernel and the GNU dmd init system.
It is console-only, and may be used primarily to try out Guix."

Link to Original Source
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NetBSD 5.1.2 announced

unixisc unixisc writes  |  more than 2 years ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "Soren Jacobsen has announced the release of NetBSD 5.1.2: "The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce that version 5.1.2 of the NetBSD operating system is now available. NetBSD 5.1.2 is the second critical/security update of the NetBSD 5.1 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed critical for security or stability reasons. Please note that all fixes in critical/security updates (i.e., NetBSD 5.0.1, 5.0.2, etc.) are cumulative, so the latest update contains all such fixes since the corresponding minor release. These fixes will also appear in future minor releases (i.e., NetBSD 5.1, 5.2, etc.), together with other less-critical fixes and feature enhancements. NetBSD 5.1.2 is dedicated to the memory of Yoshihiro Masuda, who passed away in May 2011."
Link to Original Source
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IPv6-handling flaw found in Windows 7

unixisc unixisc writes  |  more than 2 years ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "I don't see how MS can claim that exploiting the vulnerability requires local network access, when the very nature of IPv6 will give everybody a globally routeable access, which would be reachable anyway. If they have the fix, it needs to be made available, since in IPv6, every node would have to be secured with an appropriate firewall and malware."
Link to Original Source
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AT&T plans for all networks to be on IPv6 by 2

unixisc unixisc writes  |  more than 2 years ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "US NETWORK OPERATOR AT&T believes that by 2020 most networks should have completely moved onto IPv6.
AT&T, like all major network providers, has been banging on about IPv6 for many years but with the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses earlier this year the looming change over was brought into sharp focus. The plan in the short term is to run 'dual stack' networks, meaning running the current IPv4 network and the next generation IPv6 network side-by-side, however according to a report by AT&T that will only continue until 2020."

Link to Original Source

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