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Comments

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Russia Writes Off 90 Percent of North Korea Debt

unixisc Re:Will this effect markets? (155 comments)

In long term, massively. South Korea will get much cheaper gas, and it might have a stabilizing effect and North Korea will likely be even more closely tied to South through the financial benefits of the functioning pipeline, such as transit fees.

The main problem is that North Korea may start behaving like Ukraine with the gas, stealing it from the pipeline and even using it as a weapon against South Korea. But potential of getting gas pipeline in South Korea will likely far outweigh the cons.

Two questions:

  1. 1. Will North Korea agree to let gas pass through its territory to South Korea?
  2. 2. More importantly, is South Korea so stupid as to sign on such a deal that could leave them vulnerable to the Pyongyang regime?

about half an hour ago
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Microsoft Plans $1 Billion Server Farm In Iowa

unixisc Re:Will... (81 comments)

Probably Windows Server 2012, w/ IIS and HyperV

42 minutes ago
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Ask Slashdot: Which Router Firmware For Bandwidth Management?

unixisc IPv6 support (98 comments)

I checked out the wiki page, and looks like out of the 11 models, 6 support IPv6 (and a few other features such as VLANs, 5GHz) while the other 5 don't. How exactly does one know if one is getting Tomato which ones do? Also, the bandwidth management & superior QoS - is that there for both IPv4 AND IPv6? Also, except Shibby, none of them have IPSEC support.

Incidentally, which CPU is Tomato geared towards? MIPS? Given that it's there for Broadcom routers?

yesterday
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'Accidental' Siberian Mummies Part of Mysterious Ancient Arctic Civilization

unixisc Re:Then Fox News... (34 comments)

Forgot to add - the US does have Alaska, so Obama can't claim no proximity to the Arctic circle. Particularly since he believes that the US has 57 states, so AK has to be one of them.

yesterday
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'Accidental' Siberian Mummies Part of Mysterious Ancient Arctic Civilization

unixisc Re:Then Fox News... (34 comments)

So we can then have Stephen Harper establish his credentials as the leader of the Free World, by taking on Putin. It may seem a lot, except that Russia is as sparsely populated as Canada.

One idea - move all unemployed Americans - or USians, as /.ers like to call it - to Ellesmere & Baffin Island, so that the Western claims on the North Pole is established. There would be enough to take on the entire Russian army - and I'd bet that most of them are there on their borders w/ Ukraine, as well as the Caucasus, and not on their northern shore.

In the meantime, the world's 'Have-nots' can make a beeline for the Antarctic...

yesterday
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SSD-HDD Price Gap Won't Go Away Anytime Soon

unixisc Re:How big OS? (253 comments)

Maybe, but I was talking about having the OS on a drive separate from the main applications & data. Say the BIOS and OS kernel in a BIOS NOR flash, the rest of the OS on, say, a PCIe SSD and all the applications & data on a separate SATA drive - HDD or SSD.

2 days ago
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SSD-HDD Price Gap Won't Go Away Anytime Soon

unixisc How big OS? (253 comments)

Other reason for having the OS on SSD is that one doesn't frequently change the OS data - it's mainly read, except for times one does an OS update. Given that the endurance of SSDs are lower than that of HDDs, it makes sense that something that's less frequently updated would sit on an SSD, while user data, which is frequently updated, would sit on an HDD. Also, the OS is a fixed size, and would typically be something like 16GB. So one could get an SLC SSD - one w/ the highest performance, w/ a PCIe interface, w/ a low enough density to avoid blowing up the cost of the configuration, and just use it for the OS.

Also - how big is the OS itself - in terms of Mb/Gb? Windows 8.1 is overall some 16GB, from what I understand, so how big would the kernel be? Reason I ask is that so far, PCs have had a NOR flash of 4Mb for their BIOS. Given how memory densities have grown, there is the scope here to grow the BIOS flash and contain within it the entire kernel of Linux/*BSD/Windows8.*, and then let the rest of the OS reside on the storage.

That way, the system is more secure, since there are ways a BIOS flash can be protected by hardware (Write Protection states, for one) and other things that fall in Userland can go into an SSD or an HDD, depending on the system configuration. User data, such as movies, can go into the HDDs.

2 days ago
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SSD-HDD Price Gap Won't Go Away Anytime Soon

unixisc Why SATA SDDs @ all? (253 comments)

Having followed this for some time now, one thing I don't get - why do people go for SATA SDDs instead of all the way for PCIe ones? Cost can't be the reason, b'cos the only reason to prefer flash memory to the usual hard disk media is performance. It wouldn't make sense to put a PCIe interface on an HDD, since there is no way the HDD could provide the data at that speed. But flash is different, and can. So it only makes sense to go w/ SATA/PATA HDDs if cost is the issue, and PCIe SDDs if performance is. But I just don't see the point in going w/ SATA SDDs, where one gets all the disadvantages of both SATA and SDDs, and the only advantages of SATA - cost - is probably more than offset by the disadvantage of SDD - which is again cost.

So someone explain to me again - what's the case for going w/ SATA SDDs at all?

2 days ago
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Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released

unixisc Re:Single ARM kernel? (172 comments)

Why so? It makes sense to concentrate Ubuntu on a platform where Windows doesn't exist (unless MS directly works on it). Any x64 based platform will have Windows running, but only a few custom ARM builds will. So what Ubuntu has done here makes good sense. They can stage it on the Raspberry Pi or Beagleboards & be off to the races.

2 days ago
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Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released

unixisc Re:*Yawn* I'll Wait for the Mint Edition (172 comments)

Does Mint now follow Ubuntu releases at all? Or just stick to Debian? B'cos under the hood, it's Debian, and since Unity has been the hood ornament of Ubuntu for some time now (not counting Xubuntu/Lubuntu), which Mint doesn't use, why would Mint bother following Ubuntu at all? It may have started off as an Ubuntu derivative, but is it so any longer?

2 days ago
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Apache OpenOffice Reaches 100 Million Downloads. Now What?

unixisc Re:I wonder how much damage... (277 comments)

Exchange is not a part of Office. Outlook is, but it's not as integral a part of it as is PowerPoint & Access. One could replace Outlook w/ Seamonkey and do just fine. Besides, an increasing number of mails are webmail enabled, if not directly off Gmail, and could just use whatever browser one is using (granted, w/ curtailed functionality)

2 days ago
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Apache OpenOffice Reaches 100 Million Downloads. Now What?

unixisc Re:What now? 1 billion! (277 comments)

Not just Excel, PowerPoint as well. Get the LO and CalligraSuite spreadsheets and presentation packages on par w/ Excel & PowerPoint, and you'll see a lot more adapters of those. Office doesn't consist of just Word.

2 days ago
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How Does Heartbleed Alter the 'Open Source Is Safer' Discussion?

unixisc Re:Original premise is false (580 comments)

Many eyeballs may make bugs shallower, but those many eyeballs don't really exist. Source availability does not translate to many people examining that source. People, myself included, may like to build to install packages but that's it. What we need are intelligent bots to constantly trawl source repositories looking for bugs. People just don't have the time any more.

Not just that, the only people who'd find such bugs are the people actually working on those programs. Usually, not their downstream users.

4 days ago
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How Does Heartbleed Alter the 'Open Source Is Safer' Discussion?

unixisc Re:Even a bestselling novel can have a typo (580 comments)

The 'millions of eyeballs' meme is just that. How many people actually know how to read code? Just b'cos it's open doesn't mean that it's comprehendible, and therefore, the fact that the code is open & out there doesn't have that much of an advantage, particularly when it's such complex code.

4 days ago
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Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

unixisc Re:Fight for the land (297 comments)

Ukraine would have lost such a war easily: they'd even lose if Russia decided to conquer Ukraine. I agree - the US should take an aggressive policy against fence jumpers. If the US dealt w/ Mexican immigrants in the same manner that Mexico deals w/ Central American immigrants, they wouldn't have an illegal immigration issue.

4 days ago
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Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

unixisc Re:Give up your nukes! (297 comments)

Soviet nuclear weapons outside Russia

- Belarus had 81 single warhead missiles stationed on its territory after the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991. They were all transferred to Russia by 1996. In May 1992, Belarus acceded to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.[59]

- Kazakhstan inherited 1,400 nuclear weapons from the Soviet Union, and transferred them all to Russia by 1995. Kazakhstan has since acceded to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.[60]

- Ukraine has acceded to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Ukraine inherited about 5,000 nuclear weapons when it became independent from the Soviet Union in 1991, making its nuclear arsenal the third-largest in the world.[61] By 1996, Ukraine had voluntarily disposed of all nuclear weapons within its territory, disassembling them in Russia.[62]

Kazakhstan & Belarus turned over the weapons to Russia, while Ukraine got them sent to Russia and disassembled.

4 days ago
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Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

unixisc Re:Give up your nukes! (297 comments)

It made sense for Ukraine to give that up. The controls were all still in the Kremlin: it's not like someone in Kiev could have turned them on and launched an attack on Turkey, or Moldova, or Romania, or Slovakia. Those nukes could, however, have been turned on from Moscow. Why would any regime in Kyiv keep weapons on its soil that it had no control over? The Kremlin could theoretically turn them on and send them all at US troops in Iraq, and a retaliation could have involved the bombing of Ukraine. Once the Soviet Union came unravelled, it made sense for Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus to turn over all their nukes to Russia

4 days ago

Submissions

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GNU Guix 0.4 released

unixisc unixisc writes  |  about 7 months ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "From: Ludovic Courtès

We are pleased to celebrate GNU’s 30th anniversary with the release of
GNU Guix version 0.4, representing 300 commits by 5 people over 2
months.

This release comes with a QEMU virtual machine image that demonstrates
preliminary work toward building a stand-alone GNU system with Guix.
The image uses the GNU Linux-Libre kernel and the GNU dmd init system.
It is console-only, and may be used primarily to try out Guix."

Link to Original Source
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NetBSD 5.1.2 announced

unixisc unixisc writes  |  more than 2 years ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "Soren Jacobsen has announced the release of NetBSD 5.1.2: "The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce that version 5.1.2 of the NetBSD operating system is now available. NetBSD 5.1.2 is the second critical/security update of the NetBSD 5.1 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed critical for security or stability reasons. Please note that all fixes in critical/security updates (i.e., NetBSD 5.0.1, 5.0.2, etc.) are cumulative, so the latest update contains all such fixes since the corresponding minor release. These fixes will also appear in future minor releases (i.e., NetBSD 5.1, 5.2, etc.), together with other less-critical fixes and feature enhancements. NetBSD 5.1.2 is dedicated to the memory of Yoshihiro Masuda, who passed away in May 2011."
Link to Original Source
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IPv6-handling flaw found in Windows 7

unixisc unixisc writes  |  more than 2 years ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "I don't see how MS can claim that exploiting the vulnerability requires local network access, when the very nature of IPv6 will give everybody a globally routeable access, which would be reachable anyway. If they have the fix, it needs to be made available, since in IPv6, every node would have to be secured with an appropriate firewall and malware."
Link to Original Source
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AT&T plans for all networks to be on IPv6 by 2

unixisc unixisc writes  |  more than 2 years ago

unixisc (2429386) writes "US NETWORK OPERATOR AT&T believes that by 2020 most networks should have completely moved onto IPv6.
AT&T, like all major network providers, has been banging on about IPv6 for many years but with the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses earlier this year the looming change over was brought into sharp focus. The plan in the short term is to run 'dual stack' networks, meaning running the current IPv4 network and the next generation IPv6 network side-by-side, however according to a report by AT&T that will only continue until 2020."

Link to Original Source

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