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AMD's New Radeon HD 6870 and 6850 Cards Debut

uuddlrlrab Re:Oh wow! New graphics cards! (153 comments)

Yeah, it would be interesting to see what the dotslash crowd has to say. Wonder if it'd be anything similar to what the /. crowd has to say.

more than 2 years ago
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Laser Fusion Passes Major Hurdle

uuddlrlrab Re:So... (354 comments)

...it's unlikely that they won't get into the next big thing in power as long as they still have control over it.

And that is exactly what worries me, especially with everyone going off the deep end about "Bad government! Deregulate everything!" It's like the entire period of '01 to '09 just went *poof! vanish* from our collective memory in terms of actual details and just who did what.

more than 4 years ago
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Laser Fusion Passes Major Hurdle

uuddlrlrab Re:Oil dependence isn't a myth, just annoying (354 comments)

Well, here's the kicker. It's where the "Oil as a God" argument falls apart, and really is due to a faulty assumption on which said argument is based: Green energy does not completely replace oil, only as a replacement power source, e.g. our electrical grid, and (possibly, depending further advances) for transportation. I've heard & read of various research into creating synthetic fibers & plastic-esque materials based from corn silk and other "natural" materials rather than petroleum, but I don't know how far along such research is.
Still, it's ridiculous to assume that a collapse is imminent with the advent of a new technology; I'd guess and hope that a change-over would be done more incrementally to see how it would work out. As for the oil barons' financial well being?... Suck it up. Whatever happened to free-market capitalism, and may the best player win, survival of the fittest, etc? If you can't see anything above the edge of the oil barrel in which you live, can't innovate with a new business model to keep up with changing demand, who's fault is that?

more than 4 years ago
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Laser Fusion Passes Major Hurdle

uuddlrlrab Re:So... (354 comments)

Yeah, special interest groups wouldn't have any impact on this at all. Especially now that corporate contributions to political smear- I mean, opinion films has been lifted, I'm sure all the oil, natural gas, and coal groups will be glad to jump on it's back- I mean, aboard.

more than 4 years ago
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Panel Warns NASA On Commercial Astronaut Transport

uuddlrlrab Just to play Devil's advocate... (319 comments)

...how many *significant* recalls have there been for vehicles within, oh, just the past four years? The past two? Just 2009? How about the most recent one, gas pedals on certain Toyotas sticking? It's bad enough if something like that causes a wreck here on Earth, but in space, there's no such thing as "a crash you walk away from."

more than 4 years ago
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Panel Warns NASA On Commercial Astronaut Transport

uuddlrlrab Re:How is this a good idea? (319 comments)

Yeah, but where does that stop? What if the program puts such a cheap value on the participating astronauts that they become as expendable as the impact probes we shot at the moon? What if Airmen stop signing up? What then? Conscription? Random short-stick lottery from qualifying candidates? As far as your other examples go, cars and so forth, a lot has to do with, yes, private sector interests that will pay just enough to reasonably limit their liability, and not a penny more, politics, and a general public that's been numbed to a point of indifference. Using certain things about our society that are pretty f***ed up as an example and justification to let our space program be f***ed up is just a bad can of worms to open. Allowing standards to slacken instead of being raised, that's not progress; that's the disgusting slob still at the bar some time in the A.M. drunkenly screaming, "WHADYA MEAN, LAST CALL?! BULL****!!!" I, for one, do not want us to be that guy.

more than 4 years ago
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Lithium Air Batteries Get Boost From IBM and DOE

uuddlrlrab Re:Well (240 comments)

Can the US Gov hold patents? Is that legal?

If anything, I'd say it will either be unencumbered by patents (some open license format) in the best case, or IBM will get some kind of limited patent as part of their "cut."

more than 4 years ago
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India Moves To Put Its First Man In Space By 2016

uuddlrlrab Re:What will they be called? (242 comments)

The weird practice that there be a different English word for every nation's astronauts just reflects the strange place the space program resides in: a political and cultural bauble, not an essential activity for the future of the human race. It's sad.

Sad, but not surprising. Look at how we, as a culture, have treated so-called "big science." As soon as the [elitist snob]unwashed masses[/es], and particularly politicians, think that Fermi, or our various other big research labs, can come up with a solution for something, or create a fancy new toy for the Pentagon, they're willing to invest, but only the minimum, and feel it their right to demand a solution ASAP. They fail, however, to understand that such research labs need funding of a significant amount for significant periods, and aren't really "quick-fix" institutions, but rather places to advance our broader scope of understanding of the Universe. I remember seeing a PBS special, "The Atom Smashers," that covered a period just before CERN opened their V.L.A, and how Fermi was striving to find the Higgs-Boson before such a heavyweight contender entered they playing field. Part of the film featured a public forum of sorts, to educate people on "big science" research, which from the looks of it was conducted at least in the 1980s, perhaps later. The people asking questions seemed to be utterly confused as to just what the scientists there did, and I got the impression of a distinct impatience that they weren't producing immediately viable results. The more the scientist conducting the Q&A session tried to answer and relate the relevance of their research, the more it just dissolved into contentious questioning of the worth of such research. As long as this anti-intellectual attitude remains the cultural norm, things like space travel and major physics labs, etc, will remain just as you said: a cultural bauble.

Wow, really did not mean to go on like that, but it needed to be said.

more than 4 years ago
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India Moves To Put Its First Man In Space By 2016

uuddlrlrab Re:First call center in space scheduled for 2021 (242 comments)

Bush also didn't inherit an enormous national debt from a previous administration, did he? No, I do believe he started out with a surplus... The sad thing is, somehow, the far right has managed to cloud the issue by calling into question the surplus, and, what's worse, spread the untrue and utterly ludicrous notion that Bush reduced spending. They mysteriously pull a few cherry-picked and sometimes completely fictitious numbers out of their hat, and *WHRRRR-CHUGA-CHUGA-CHUGA-CHUGA* there goes the spin machine, hard at work.

What's interesting to note is the record of debt between the two major parties, going back all the way to the Kennedy-Johnson era. Neither party has been stellar, but it does seem an awful lot that during the periods of the so-called "fiscal conservatives" have actually been some of the highest debt periods our nation has had. Care to explain that?

This is all off-topic anyway. This is an article about freaking India and their space program, ergo, the wrong place to start a squabble over US politics.

more than 4 years ago
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Supreme Court Rolls Back Corporate Campaign Spending Limits

uuddlrlrab Re:Right of free speech + right of association (1070 comments)

No Corporations and Unions are different from Political Parties and Individuals in a specific way.

I believe you meant "No , Corporations and Unions are..." Seriously, punctuation matters. My brother happened to glance at that sentence in the course of discussing this with me, and about had an aneurysm.
That said, I agree.

more than 3 years ago
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Obama Appointee Sunstein Favors Infiltrating Online Groups

uuddlrlrab Re:Wow, you can't get better sources than WND? (689 comments)

To add to ubernostrum's reply, and further drive the point home, the paper explicitly cites...

Those who subscribe to conspiracy theories may create serious risks, including risks of violence...

I'm pretty sure preventing threats to the US public like violent acts such as, say, a McVeigh-style bomb attack, preventing cold-blooded murder, etc, are responsibilities of the government.

more than 4 years ago
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Obama Appointee Sunstein Favors Infiltrating Online Groups

uuddlrlrab Re:Why fear terrorists... (689 comments)

...I really never thought I'd live to see the day when someone praised Moore and Limbaugh in the same sentence.

As far as Limbaugh goes, I forgot when the spirit of the 1st amendment was so people could encourage things like this...

The dream end of [Operation Chaos] is that this keeps up to the convention, and that we have a recreation of Chicago 1968 with burning cars, protests, fire, and literal riots and all of that, that is the objective here.

Yeah, great use of those 1st amendment rights, Oxy-Rush. If you wonder why on earth bad ideas like the one in TFA get started, look no further than the talking heads and stuffed shirts on conservative KRWA radio, and the Teabag-grabbers still incoherently screeching, "DEATH PANELS, DEATH PANELS!" or, "KENYAN NATIONAL, KENYAN NATIONAL!!" long after the myth has been debunked. If the OP is to be believed, this wanders uncomfortably close to artificially shaping public opinion, and may be a step in the wrong direction. On the other hand, how does this administration deal with a an angry mob intent on tar-and-feathering them for the crimes (yes, crimes. Not a typo) that the previous administration committed? As far as I see it, debunking myths and lies is, at least, a noble cause. It's just the methodology that's dubious.

more than 4 years ago
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Only 27% of Organizations Use Encryption

uuddlrlrab Re:How much of this is really SENSITIVE? (175 comments)

I don't think this is so much corporate espionage, as it is personal data of either customers, clients, or even the company's own employees, falling into the wrong hands. Like identity thieves or black-hat hackers sifting for credit card numbers or other usable financial information, payroll/account details that could possibly include bank account numbers, etc. How many people these days use direct deposit? And some companies that handle medical/rx must abide by HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), which requires certain "Personal Info" to be released only internally, or only to third parties directly involved with a given person's health care. There are companies that need this, either by law, or just as a good common sense measure, and if not for the entire organization, then at least some departments should look into it.

more than 4 years ago
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Only 27% of Organizations Use Encryption

uuddlrlrab Re:Does anyone beiieve this number? (175 comments)

In what office jobs I've held (mostly inbound customer service), I've never encountered an encryption program deployed company-wide to make sure data stays secure. I did see a lot of company propag-, I mean, materials referencing the need for encryption and good data protection practices. In other words, a lot of hot air.

more than 4 years ago
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Samsung Develops a Transparent OLED Laptop Screen

uuddlrlrab Re:Automatic window tinting (148 comments)

Photoelectrochromic windows and the like have been around for quite awhile. Using OLED's for that effect would be pointless IMO. Wrong tool for the job.

How would that work? OLEDs emit light, they don't block light.

Hrmmm... New idea! If these can be put on a flexible transparent screen, programmable t-shirts! Create and upload your own graphics! Even animations! Next step, programmable, & touch-interactive clothing...

more than 4 years ago
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The Gradual Erosion of the Right To Privacy

uuddlrlrab Re:Good Morning. (234 comments)

Seriously...that's like...dividing by the product of dividing by zero. That's like the universe saying Candlejack. I can't th

more than 4 years ago
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The Gradual Erosion of the Right To Privacy

uuddlrlrab Re:A simple cure - if you can't beat 'em... (234 comments)

As the sole subject of the corporate entity, you are Chief accounting officer, Chief administrative officer, Chief analytics officer, Chief brand officer, Chief channel officer, Chief compliance officer, Chief communications officer, Chief data officer, Chief executive officer, Chief financial officer, Chief information officer, Chief information security officer, Chief knowledge officer, Chief learning officer, Chief legal officer, Chief marketing officer, Chief networking officer, Chief operating officer, Chief procurement officer, Chief risk officer, Chief science officer, Chief strategy officer, Chief technical officer, Chief visionary officer, Chief human resources officer, Board of Directors + Chairman of the Board, all rolled into one. The decisions are all coming from the same place. If you have multiple personality disorder, well, then you have an excuse to worry, since there could be a hostile takeover. Unless, of course, you're the personality taking over, in which case, have a blast, take no prisoners, etc... I'll just be over here...far, far away, over here.

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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Democrats, Minority Groups Question Net Neutrality

uuddlrlrab uuddlrlrab writes  |  more than 4 years ago

uuddlrlrab (1617237) writes "A group of 72 Democratic lawmakers is the latest to question the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's move to create new net neutrality regulations.

Democrats, including U.S. President Barack Obama, have generally supported new rules that would prohibit broadband providers from selectively blocking or slowing Web content, but the group of 72 members of the House of Representatives sent a letter Thursday to FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, saying they're concerned that new regulations would slow down investment in broadband networks..."

Link to Original Source
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Liposuction leftovers make easy stem cells: study

uuddlrlrab uuddlrlrab writes  |  about 5 years ago

uuddlrlrab (1617237) writes "WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Fat sucked out of chunky thighs or flabby bellies might provide an easy source of stem cells made using new and promising technology, U.S. researchers reported on Tuesday. They found immature fat cells in the material removed during liposuction were easy to transform into cells called induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells. They were easier to work with than the skin cells usually used to make iPS cells, the team at Stanford University's School of Medicine in California reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. IPS cells are made using genes that take them back in time to a more immature and pliable state. They can then be re-directed to form heart cells, bone cells, brain cells or any other type of desired cell. "These cells are not as far along on the differentiation pathway, so they're easier to back up to an earlier state," Ning Sun, who led the study, said in a statement. "They are more embryonic-like than fibroblasts, which take more effort to reprogram." Stem cells are the body's master cell and embryonic stem cells are the most malleable, morphing into any cell type. IPS cells look very much the same, and teams are trying to make stocks of these cells to use in research and, eventually, to treat disease. "Not only can we start with a lot of cells, we can reprogram them much more efficiently," said Dr. Joseph Wu, who worked on the study. "Fibroblasts, or skin cells, must be grown in the lab for three weeks or more before they can be reprogrammed. But these stem cells from fat are ready to go right away." (Editing by Phil Stewart)"
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