Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

As Domestic Abuse Goes Digital, Shelters Turn To Counter-surveillance With Tor

v3rgEz Re:Digital Domestic Abuse (133 comments)

Did you read the piece? She was beaten repeatedly, and the digital component is what kept her trapped in the relationship.

about 3 months ago
top

Local police department refuses to disclose what weapons it owns

v3rgEz Re:Oh, really? (2 comments)

It varies greatly state to state, but most states have this as some form of public record.

about a year ago
top

'Freedom of Information, Finally Made Easy' by MuckRock (Video)

v3rgEz Re:From the founder (43 comments)

Our service has two big fan groups: People who have never filed a request, and people who file a lot and would like help tracking. For either, if we can save them a half hour hunting for how to fill out the request, to remember to follow up, to sort out which documents went to which request, to figure out where to send the request, we think $4 is a fantastic value. If your time is worth less than that, hopefully we can serve as a good resource just for reference purposes.

Right now, we manually help people with the appeals process, and can recommend lawyers we've worked with in the past if it comes to a lawsuit. It's definitely the trickier part, but we recently launched a free question and answer tool (https://www.muckrock.com/questions/) in addition to our individual support. Hope that helps.

about a year ago
top

'Freedom of Information, Finally Made Easy' by MuckRock (Video)

v3rgEz Re:From the founder (43 comments)

Processing all the requests and appeals across the federal government cost $412,647,829.53 in FY 2010: http://www.justice.gov/oip/foiapost/fy-2011-annual-report-summary.pdf We hope to reduce these costs by eliminating the need for duplicitous requests, since everything requested through MuckRock is eventually made public. The federal government also has a system for recouping fees from requesters.

about a year ago
top

'Freedom of Information, Finally Made Easy' by MuckRock (Video)

v3rgEz From the founder (43 comments)

Michael here from MuckRock. Nobody else does what we do in the US for free. We lick the stamps, send the envelopes, scan the documents when they come back, and help post them. Hundreds of our users and thousands of our visitors find this to be a valuable service, but if you don't want to use us,we make that easy to: We've got thousands of request templates you can copy and paste for your own use, and a public database of agency contacts that's much more comprehensive than anything else we've seen. Any particular concerns we can address, please let me know. But for the record, over the past 3 years, we've spent about $30 on advertising, all on Google AdWords. Wasn't worth it.

about a year ago
top

Covert BT Phorm Trial Report Leaked

v3rgEz Re:Loss of Common Carrier Exemption? (292 comments)

Absolutely, and you've come up with a great point. If they are scanning and replacing ads, then sure (since as you point out they lose common carrier status) they can scan a) warez b) pirated music/movies c) illegal porn d) libelous material, at least at some levels. By editing some material they substantially endanger their rights to distribute all material, per what I was taught in Intro to Internet Law (could be outdated by now) and ISP's won't have many customers if you can't download your mp3z.

more than 6 years ago

Submissions

top

FBI studied how much drones impact your privacy, & then marked it secret

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about a week ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "When federal agencies adopt new technology, they're required by law to do Privacy Impact Assessments, which is exactly what the FBI did regarding its secretive drone program. The PIAs are created to help the public and federal government assess what they're risking through the adoption of new technology. That part is a little trickier, since the FBI is refusing to release any of the PIA on its drone project, stating it needs to be kept, er, private to protect national security."
top

Comcast executives appear to share cozy relationships with regulators

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about a month ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "A month before Comcast's announcement of a $45B takeover of rival Time-Warner, Comcast's top lobbyist invited the US government's top antitrust regulators to share the company's VIP box at the Sochi Olympics. A Freedom of Information Act request from Muckrock reveals that the regulators reluctantly declined, saying "it sounds like so much fun" but the pesky "rules folks" would frown on it, instead suggesting a more private dinner later."
Link to Original Source
top

Red sneakers and hoodies: The surprising upside of standing out

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about a month ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "The casual outfit that Facebook co-founder and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg sported in front of elegantly dressed bankers and investors just before his company went public generated much clamor in the media. While some observers judged the young entrepreneur’s choice to wear his typical hoodie and jeans on such an official occasion as a mark of immaturity, others defended it as a sign of boldness that helped spread publicity about the deal. The research seems to be on Zuck's side: Dressing down might help you get ahead in many environments."
Link to Original Source
top

Citing "Terrorism," Illinois spent $250k on Stingray to fight regular crime

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about a month ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "New documents released on MuckRock show the Illinois State Police crying "Terrorist" in order to get funding and approval for a $250,000 Stingray cell snooping system, even though, as Mike Masnick at Techdirt notes, the technology is being used to fight regular crime. The ToS on the device actually prevent officers from seeking a warrant to use it, because doing so would disclose the device's use to the courts. MuckRock currently has a crowdfunding campaign to fund similar requests across the country."
top

Even in digital photography age, high schoolers still flock to the darkroom

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about a month and a half ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however,
old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts."

Link to Original Source
top

Help Crowd-FOIA Stingray usage across America

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about a month and a half ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "Collaborative investigative news site MuckRock is trying to take a national look at Stingray usage across America, and is looking for people to submit contact information for their local police departments and other law enforcement groups for a mass FOIA campaign. The submissions are free, but the site is also running a crowdfunding campaign to cover the cost of stamps, etc. on Beacon Reader."
top

With cheeky first tweet, @CIA comes to life--now it just needs to use email

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 2 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "With a bit of self-effacing spy humor, the CIA joined Twitter with a couple tweets and promises to disclose #unclassified information going forward. Unfortunately, this comes as the CIA still requires those filing FOIAs to mail or fax their requests in rather than use email or even a web portal, as more and more agencies are increasingly doing. The FOIA filers at MuckRock have a run down on just how hard it is to get declassified info, hashtag or no, out of America's most prominent spy agency."
Link to Original Source
top

Echelon Everywhere: Local police increasingly rely on secret surveillance

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 2 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "The Wall Street Journal reports on how local law enforcement is increasingly requesting (and receiving) sealed wiretap requests and surveillance that doesn't require a warrant (subscription required) for cellular data, a move that is making some courts uneasy — but not uneasy enough to stop the practice. One group has set up a crowdfunding campaign to research how far the practice has spread, hoping to raise money to file and follow up on public records requests across the country for policies, invoices, and other "surveillance metadata.""
Link to Original Source
top

50 years later, MIT looks back at AI and networking pioneer Project MAC

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 2 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "Fifty years ago, a major project that ultimately seeded much of today’s computer technology was created at MIT: Project MAC, and the Multics operating system initiative within the project. Daniel Dern interviews some of the key figures involved in the pioneering project, looking at how one laboratory helped spawn Ethernet, AI, and dozens of tech companies and other innovations that took ideas from the lab to the personal computer."
top

The Exploitative Economics of Academic Publishing

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 3 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "Taxpayers in the United States spend $139 billion a year on scientific research, yet much of this research is inaccessible not only to the public, but also to other scientists. This is the consequence of an exploitative scientific journal system that rewards academic publishers while punishing taxpayers, scientists, and universities. Fortunately, cheap open-access alternatives are not only possible, but already beginning to take root, as this article explores in-depth."
Link to Original Source
top

Aereo has its (first) day before Supreme Court

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 3 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "Aereo, which streams broadcast TV over the Internet, devised a somewhat extreme hack to get around public performance and copyright law: Give each user their own antenna, creating thousands of individual "remote DVRs" for the masses. Predictably, broadcaster have freaked out, and now the Supreme Court has heard initial arguments to determine whether Aereo's model has any legal weight. Here's the full transcript (Warning: Big PDF). The court is expected to rule by the end of June."
top

FBI says Russians out to steal technology from Boston firms, posing as VCs

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 4 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "It sounds like a scare from 1970s Cold War propaganda or a subplot from the popular TV series “The Americans,” but the FBI says the threat is real: Russian investment firms may be looking to steal high-tech intelligence from Boston-area companies to give to their country’s military. Many of the firms under scrutiny are in the Boston area, including those partnered with a number of area biotech companies and with ties to MIT."
Link to Original Source
top

New service lets you hitch a ride with private planes for cost of tank of gas

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 4 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "A new service, Airpooler, matches pilots with passengers looking to head the same way. Since it's not an officially licensed charter service, prices are limited to roughly the passengers share of the gas, giving pilots a way to share the expense of enjoying the open blue and flyers a taste of their personal pilot."
Link to Original Source
top

Drupal's Dries Buytaert: It's open-source software that'll eat the world

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 4 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "Drupal creator and Acquia co-founder Dries Buytaert said it's open source software that will "eat the world," pointing to Cloudera, MongoDB, and, yes, Acquia, but saying it's not the price point but the quality that's making the difference. “Our customers care about the fact that they can use the best technology, and that’s what we try to emphasize," he said. "The fact that open source is free is not really the main reason it gets adopted.""
Link to Original Source
top

Founders open up on dealing with impression through pus and downs of a startup

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 4 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "Founders at a number of Boston startups shared their stories of building and growing a company while battling depression. One founder didn't even realize he was depressed until glucose and blood tests came back normal, while another said it was worse than her life struggles growing up in the projects.

All shared different coping mechanisms. Any advice from /. on dealing with the same?"

Link to Original Source
top

After FOIA, Homeland Security releases social media monitoring guides

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 4 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "With a Freedom of Information Act request, MuckRock has received copies of two of the guides Homeland Security uses to monitor social media, one on standard procedures and a desktop binder for analysts.

Now we're asking for help to go through it: See something worth digging into? Say something, and share it with others so we know what to FOIA next."
top

This gadget is a bacon-scented alarm clock for your iPhone

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 5 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "If you’ve given up bacon for Lent, stop reading now. The same goes for people who don’t own a smartphone made by Apple Inc. But if you’ve got an iPhone and a love for “the candy of meat,” you might want to check out a new high-tech promotional gimmick from old-school meatpacker Oscar Meyer. The company, which is owned by Kraft Foods Group Inc., is giving away 4,700 gadgets that convert an iPhone into a bacon-scented alarm clock."
Link to Original Source
top

A vast surveillance network runs across America, powered by repo men

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 5 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "Even as some police departments curtail their sue of license plate scanning technology over privacy concerns, private companies have been amassing a much larger, almost completely unregulated database that pulls in billions of scans a year, marking the exact time and location of millions of vehicles across America. The database, which is often offered to law enforcement for free, is collected by repo and towing companies eager to tap easy revenue, while the database companies than resell that data, often for as little as $25 for a plate's complete recorded history."
Link to Original Source
top

Feds now oppose Aereo, rejecting cloud apocalypse argument

v3rgEz v3rgEz writes  |  about 5 months ago

v3rgEz (125380) writes "TV streaming service Aereo expected broadcasters would put up a fight. The startup may not have seen the Justice Department as a threat, however. The Justice Department has now weighed in, saying in a filing that it’s siding with major broadcasters who accuse Aereo of stealing TV content. In its filing, the Justice Department noted it doesn’t believe a win for broadcasters would dismantle the precedent that created the cloud computing industry, as Aereo has previously claimed.

The case is expected to go before the Supreme Court in late April."

Journals

v3rgEz has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>