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Comments

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Saurabh Narain and His Homemade Lego-Based Rubik's Cube Solver (Video)

vigmeister Re:STEM has no future (43 comments)

With outsourcing, you get what you pay for. Most outsourcing programs are cost-cutting measures. Companies go to the cheapest vendor available and expect comparable results. And when that does not happen, they feel comfortable and safe in the fact that "Indian IT personnel are less competent".

When you have a large number of IT graduates, you can expect a lot more incompetent graduates as well. And that is exactly what you get when you go to "IT sweatshops". Successful outsourcing programs would be found amongst the companies that pay the best salaries and rely on the PPP differences to bring the cost advantage. If you can get a selection of the top 10% of the talent in the US for $200,000, I would assume you can get comparable talent (top 1% in India) for $120,000. But this is not a common way to go about outsourcing. Ask those that do and you would be surprised at what is possible.

The issue is not about racial or genetic advantages. It is a question of comparative advantages and available resources between the two countries.

Cheers!

about 5 months ago
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US Wireless Carriers Shifting To Voice Over LTE

vigmeister Re:Seamless fallback (126 comments)

I do not know if I should apologize for RTFA or that I made the post above without doing so....

about 6 months ago
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US Wireless Carriers Shifting To Voice Over LTE

vigmeister Seamless fallback (126 comments)

Blindingly obvious to me is the fact that voice calls and SMS reaches me even without a high bandwidth 3G or faster data connection. If this leads to better network coverage for high speed data, I will be the first to celebrate, but until then I will stick to a split data/voice provider ... or one that can transition relatively seamlessly between the two types of networks...

Cheers!

about 6 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Communication With Locked-in Syndrome Patient?

vigmeister Crowdsourced solution? (552 comments)

http://www.gtec.at/Products/Co...

This product was on display at CeBIT and I tried it out. The calibration takes about 45 minutes, but after that period, each letter took about 10 seconds and I was rapidly improving. In principle, I would also assume that they could extend the technology to words rather than letters and combine it with some kind of predictive text input.

I really hope you find a solution that works and I think the community at large would appreciate if you could document the experience and the successes I hope you have in such a situation.

I would also ask if you could make this some kind of a collaborative project over the interwebs. There must be more people in this situation and countless people like myself who would be motivated to work on this challenge...

Let's get to it!

about 6 months ago
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Cells Reprogrammed In Living Mice

vigmeister Regeneration (29 comments)

Could be messy, but ultimately, would a 'rolling regeneration' of our organs conveniently sidestep cellular senescence? Can you hear me now?

about a year ago
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How Gen Y Should Talk To Old People At Work

vigmeister Re:Silly me (459 comments)

I think this brand I use can help with the brain rinsing... it's called P-504 or 504P or something...

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is Tech Talent More Important Than Skill?

vigmeister Re:False dichotomy (277 comments)

No left left behind..

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Moving From Contract Developers To Hiring One In-House?

vigmeister Generate Conflicts (524 comments)

1) Contract 3 developers:
- Developer to develop the code
- Tester to test the damn thing and find bugs
- Bug fixer to fix the damn bugs

2) From your experience, you should be able to set bonus related targets for each guy...

3) ????

4) Profit!!

about a year and a half ago
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Why US Mileage Ratings Are So Inaccurate

vigmeister Re:Game (374 comments)

Doesn't this translate into some kind of propaganda to influence what people care about when buying a car?

Have we collectively decided as a society that we are willing to compromise further on free speech to reduce emissions and fuel consumption (manufacturers should be free to decide how to advertise their cars)?

For the record: I do not deny climate change or its anthropogenic components - I just think the solution is to tax fuel, enforce truth in advertising (to prevent fraud) and wait for the technological breakthroughs that will make us look like luddites...

about a year and a half ago
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Why US Mileage Ratings Are So Inaccurate

vigmeister Re:Simple explanation (374 comments)

In America, gas typically refers to petrol (and colloquially, anything you put into your vehicle as fuel).

In Europe, gas typically refers to Autogas (LPG) ...

In Soviet Russia, your uncle's car converts petrol into gas ...

Cheers!

about a year and a half ago
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Summer Programming Courses Before Heading Off To College?

vigmeister Re:Don't Bother (183 comments)

This, but with a different conclusion. Learning programming meant I was able to do a different degree while working in the software industry and taking electives or doing a minor in CS. Eventually I ended up being competent in both areas which led to opportunities to dabble in an exponentially larger set of subjects...

about 2 years ago
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Summer Programming Courses Before Heading Off To College?

vigmeister Engineering student? (183 comments)

For a student with a strong math/science background, MATLAB might be useful to learn especially if he decides to pursue engineering. It helps you to learn fundamental programming (at least procedural programming) concepts while not requiring too much time to get up an running. The symbolic toolbox along with more traditional capabilities will also give him a massive leg up in doing assignments and projects because he can focus on learning concepts in most of his classes rather than executing procedural mathematical techniques (matrix operations and PDEs, I am looking at you...).
P.S. I know a TI-xx can do some of this, but calculators are the slide rules of the 21st century...

about 2 years ago
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Summer Programming Courses Before Heading Off To College?

vigmeister Re:As a professional, I would say... (183 comments)

I think the kid would be better off learning touchscreen typing...

about 2 years ago
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Summer Programming Courses Before Heading Off To College?

vigmeister Re:As a professional, I would say... (183 comments)

Having been a successful programmer for 35 years, I would discount the value of touch typing. It has been my experience that thinking is far more important than typing skills. Fast typing helps, but I think your son would find this boring.

Ah, see what you did here? A is useless. B is more important than A. (Which is orthogonal to whether A is useful in itself.) (And now the admission.) A helps, but is boring.

You missed the implication that learning to think would be a better use of the kid's summer than learning ho to type even though the latter helps...

about 2 years ago
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Summer Programming Courses Before Heading Off To College?

vigmeister Re:This cannot be underestimated (183 comments)

Great until he moves to Europe :S ... Rediscovering hunt and peck is painfully slow :/

about 2 years ago
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Making Sure Interviews Don't Turn Into Free Consulting

vigmeister Car analogy (232 comments)

This is silly... It's like a car mechanic who will not diagnose your problem and starts talking about his skills and expertise. Most places give you a free quote to have you as a customer. Lawyers and doctors charge for the first consult too and you could take that approach by *BEING* a consultant rather than interviewing for a job. Or you could tell the interviewer to fuck off as opposed to taking your hour of consulting (worth $100 or so for a decently salaried position) and considering that an investment into your job hunt. Of course, if you are looking for a job, your time is probably worth far less to you, so make a grown up judgement call as to whether the odds of getting a job are worth taking the insurmountable risk of *gasp* working for free *gasp*!

Cheers!

about 2 years ago
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Stanford Uses Million-Core Supercomputer To Model Supersonic Jet Noise

vigmeister No cores needed? (66 comments)

I was able to calculate the noise from the jet *inside the cabin* without so much as a calculator...

about 2 years ago
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ITU To Choose Emergency Line For Mobiles: 911, or 112?

vigmeister Re:Why not both? (354 comments)

But that only works if you hold your phone in your left hand...

Makes sense...right handed folks with iPhones trying to call for help => 'death grip'

about 2 years ago
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DHS Goes Ahead With 'Pre-Crime' Detection Project

vigmeister Re:Wow. (438 comments)

Simple answer: No one (probably not even you) expects them to be 100% correct*. If I am forcibly isolated and "helped" because their classifier uses 16 bit inputs from the temperature sensor and not 32, I wouldn't accept the shitty quality of life that I expect to have because my gait makes me fall more than 3 std. deviations outside the defined "average human being".

Paranoid corollary: By defining what is "not criminally psychotic", we are fundamentally influencing opportunities for reproduction. Thereby, the fitness function involved in natural evolution has an additional term introduced by those who decide what constitutes "normal". This leads to a severe risk of targeting a minority population with certain quirks as "criminally psychotic" and therefore 'cleansing' the population of this minority.

Due to the above arguments, I would say that even if you gave the "chosen ones" the best possible quality of life, this would have unforeseen effects of human evolution and I do not want to risk that. I agree that life is unfair, but being born with a propensity for crime is like having a handicap. I know this is insensitive, but having to give people in wheelchairs the same opportunities for employment possibly lowers overall productivity, but that is what I treasure in society - knowing that losing my legs tomorrow does not immediately turn my life into a total bag of shit - these rules would make my life suck a little bit lesser than it otherwise would.

* The criteria for "criminally psychotic" would be generated by psychologists (or other humans) or statistically which have the weaknesses of subjectivity and uncertainty respectively. Neither can be 100% sure of anything. Throw in the fact that we have no fucking idea whatsoever how many people with "criminal psychosis" actually commit crimes and I am really unnerved by Pre-crime detection.

Arguments based on culpability for your thoughts and human profiling are wonderfully described in almost every dystopian novel - I believe the required reading for your geek card (at least 1984 and Brave New World) ought to cover these arguments.

Cheers!

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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Tractable acoustic tractor beams

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  about 7 months ago

vigmeister (1112659) writes "Structured acoustic fields can pull macroscopic objects towards the source by means of nonconservative forces.
In order to generate the tailored acoustic field, the team used a square matrix array of about 1000 transducers, operating at ultrasound frequency (550 kilohertz), placed at the bottom of a water-filled chamber. Each one can be individually addressed, not only with on-off states, but also by programming up to eight discrete phase values. This device allows the researchers to imprint a spatial modulation on the emitted acoustic field. In this case, the generated patterns behave, in the region of interest, as a pair of plane waves whose wave vectors are symmetrically inclined towards the array centerline, where the target was suspended from a force balance. The two waves intersect at a certain height over the array plane, having a hollow core underneath; the height of the intersection point can be readjusted by changing the emission pattern from the array.

By varying the vertical position of the target, the researchers were able to obtain a detailed map of the acoustic force as a function of the distance from the object to the source plane, which was measured in terms of changes in weight of the target. Based on a theoretical analysis, two contributions of the force were clearly identified; a negative (pulling) force due to the reflection in the walls of the prisms, and a positive (pushing) one, owed to the absorbed radiation at the base. The qualitative behavior of the total force and its order of magnitude (millinewtons) agreed well with the experiments. The equilibrium position, where the two contributions of the force are exactly balanced, can be controlled by reconfiguring the acoustic field. All the measurements were done for different configurations of the acoustic pattern and for each of the two targets, whose volumes are of the order of tens of cubic centimeters.
Although the intensity gradients may play a role in the force towards the low-pressure regions, the careful design of the experiment for maximizing the forward scattering, the ability to control the equilibrium position, and the fair comparison with simulations guarantee that the main role is indeed played by the scattering force. Therefore, this is the first demonstration of a nonconservative pulling force in the acoustics realm, which complements previous demonstrations in optics.

In addition, the authors point out the potential impact that the control of acoustic forces and the generation of structured ultrasound fields may have in modern biomedical techniques. In therapeutic treatments involving focused high-intensity fields, for example, the precise control of energy deposition could be greatly improved with the use of complex beams.

Interaction between matter and waves always seems to surprise scientists in new ways. The more we advance in the study and generation of structured wave fields and novel materials, the higher the possibility of finding new effects and applications."

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Cornell researcher demonstrates precognition

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  about 4 years ago

vigmeister (1112659) writes ""Most science papers don’t begin with a description of psi, those “anomalous processes of information or energy transfer” that have no material explanation. (Popular examples of psi include telepathy, clairvoyance and psychokinesis.) It’s even less common for a serious science paper, published in an elite journal, to show that psi is a real phenomenon. But that’s exactly what Daryl Bem of Cornell University has demonstrated in his new paper, “Feeling the Future: Experimental Evidence for Anomalous Retroactive Influences on Cognition and Affect,” which was just published in The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Bem’s experimental method was extremely straightforward. He took established psychological protocols, such as affective priming and recall facilitation, and reversed the sequence, so that the cause became the effect. For instance, he might show students a long list of words and ask them to remember as many as possible. Then, the students are told to type a selection of words which had been randomly selected from the same list. Here’s where things get really weird: the students were significantly better at recalling words that they would later type."

These results are claimed to be statistically significant in the article. The relevant paper is here . If I start saving money for a rainy day does that mean I am going to get drenched in a downpour soon?"

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Muslim only FaceBook for Pakistan?

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 4 years ago

vigmeister (1112659) writes "A few young entrepreneurs seem to have come up with a solution to Pakistan blocking facebook. They're seemingly working round the clock to recreate facebook and target it towards muslims. It is not just a new social networking portal. It is actually a facebook clone intended for use by the (large) facebook userbase in Pakistan who, as a country, spurned facebook for it's user generated content. Intellectual property issues aside, I am not sure why they are trying to clone facebook. They could and possibly should contribute code and resources to Diaspora which they can ostensibly simply run an installation of and target it towards Muslims.

In their youthful naivete, they also invite 'sweet' users of other religions to join in. Which, to me, sounds like an invitation to the culturally insensitive, freedom of speech wielding crowd to defeat one of the purposes of MillatFaceBook which is to avoid blasphemy rampant in the original facebook.

"We want to tell Facebook people 'if they mess with us they have to face the consequences'," warns Usman Zaheer, COO. "If someone commits blasphemy against our Prophet Mohammed then we will become his competitor and give him immense business loss""

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Artificial life created as a synthetic organism

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 4 years ago

vigmeister (1112659) writes "

Scientists in the US have succeeded in developing the first synthetic living cell. The researchers constructed a bacterium's "genetic software" and transplanted it into a host cell. The resulting microbe then looked and behaved like the species "dictated" by the synthetic DNA. The advance, published in Science, has been hailed as a scientific landmark, but critics say there are dangers posed by synthetic organisms. The researchers hope eventually to design bacterial cells that will produce medicines and fuels and even absorb greenhouse gases.

The 'synthetic' aspect and the rest of the article makes it seems like they can control the properties of the cell. Since the dangers mentioned in the article are easy to enumerate, I wonder what the scientific community can do to escape paranoid legislation. In addition to the ethical dilemma associated with this development, the philosophical ramifications are just as significant. Also, which existing religious frameworks accommodate something approaching 'creation of life'? Or is this to religion what synthesis of urea did for chemistry? P.S. Is it just a coincidence that this came about as soon as Jack took the job? *cough*God complex*cough*"
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Snooping on keyboards through power sockets

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 5 years ago

vigmeister writes "Supposedly, most keyboards wires are poorly shielded which enables keylogging by monitoring power outlets for electricity leaking to the ground wires. "Security researchers found that poor shielding on some keyboard cables means useful data can be leaked about each character typed. By analysing the information leaking onto power circuits, the researchers could see what a target was typing. The attack has been demonstrated to work at a distance of up to 15m, but refinement may mean it could work over much longer distances. "
They then go on to mention hotel rooms as an example of a susceptible location. Perhaps I should stop packing my desktop on those business trips. On a more serious note, seeing as I am using a wired keyboard to type this, I'm curious to know if using some variety of a wireless keyboard is more secure."

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Solar plane to make public debut

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 5 years ago

vigmeister writes "Swiss adventurer Bertrand Picard is set to unveil a prototype of the solar-powered plane he hopes eventually to fly around the world. The initial version, spanning 61m but weighing just 1,500kg, will undergo trials to prove it can fly at night. Mr Picard, who made history by circling the globe non-stop in a balloon in 1999, says he wants to demonstrate the potential of renewable energies. He expects to make a crossing of the Atlantic in 2012. The HB-SIA has the look of a glider but is on the scale — in terms of its width — of a modern airliner. The aeroplane incorporates composite materials to keep it extremely light and uses super-efficient solar cells, batteries, motors and propellers to get it through the dark hours. The public unveiling on Friday of the HB-SIA is taking place at Dubendorf airfield near Zürich."
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Asus slaps Linux in the face

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 5 years ago

vigmeister writes "Techgeist has an article about an 'It's better with Windows' website from Asus and MS. I think the article should've been title 'Asus stabs Linux in the back'. "Linux just got a major slap in the face today from Asus. One of the highlights of Linux going mainstream was the wildly popular Asus Eee PC preinstalled with a customized Linux distro geared towards web applications. While I personally never got what the big deal was, I was still happy for all the Linux people out there waiting for this day, but it looks like the cause for celebration won't be lasting much longer. Asus and Microsoft have teamed up and have made a site called It's Better With Windows. The page touts how easy it is to get up and ready with Windows on an Asus Eee PC, while slyly stating that you won't have to deal with an "unfamiliar environment" and "major compatibility issues." While it is silly to state such a thing since Asus built the Linux distribution specifically for the Eee PC, I give Microsoft two points for snarky comments.""
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Using WiMAX to replace a phone?

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 5 years ago

vigmeister writes "I've decided to explore the possibility of using a netbook/MID as a phone while eschewing the services of a cellphone provider. Now that Atlanta (where I live) has WiMAX from Clear, I ought to be connected everywhere within the city to the internet (once I sign up). Theoretically, this should mean that I will be able to use my netbook as a cell phone. Of course, there are some very real issues to overcome and I am simply putting this experiment together to see if it is something that is realistically possible. This could possibly extend to uncapped 3G connections (if they exist anymore) as well. Are there any obvious problems you would foresee? Is there anything I have missed or any other questions I should attempt to answer in this 'experiment' of mine? A major issue is, of course, the fact that my pseudo-netbook has to be carried everywhere and left always on. I've asked slashdot for advice regarding the best OS for this machine. However, if the experment is somewhat succesful, it seems as if using your netbook/MID as a phone might require a relatively customized OS which could possibly be a 'remix' of a suitable Linux distro. Something like Maemo, but not as hardware specific. Thoughts, suggestions?"
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Dubai unveils world's first cloned camel

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 5 years ago

vigmeister writes "Injaz, or Achievement, was unveiled to the world alongside her surrogate mother five days after being born at the city's Camel Reproduction Centre. "We are all very excited by the birth of Injaz," Dr Lulu Skidmore, the centre's scientific director, said. "This significant breakthrough in our research programme gives a means of preserving the valuable genetics of our elite racing and milk-producing camels in the future." This camel apparently shares none of its DNA with its surrogate mother. That is significant for preserving genes as claimed above. The middle east is re-emerging as a centre of science and technology after a long hiatus which bodes well for the even distribution of technology globally. However, what happens when this technology becomes accessible to countries which have lower moral standards than accepted by the majority of the world as a baseline?"
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Is buying intl. editions of textbooks legal?

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  about 6 years ago

vigmeister writes "As a current poor graduate student(TM), a few friends and I were discussing the legality of purchasing brand new international editions of textbooks while in the US from websites like NBCIndia and third party sellers on Amazon, eBay and other websites. The cost of these textbooks is often a fraction of their cost in USD. Students snap up the international editions of these textbooks with great eagerness since you typically pay between $20 and $30 (incl. shipping) for textbooks that are priced between $100 and $200 for the US editions. A quick search online reveals no conclusive evidence regarding the issue.
So my question is this: Is the sale of these books by sellers located outside the US legal if they ship the product to the US? What if the financial transaction takes place abroad and the book is sent to your US address? Are the purchasers victims or are they also guilty of any wrongdoing? Since students often re-sell these books, the legality of their initial purchase determines the legality of their resale (even when the first-sale doctrine is considered).
More importantly, is it constitutional for publishers to restrict the sale of international editions in the US? How does this apply to other products that are outside the purview of copyright law?"
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Best OS for netbooks and underpowered tablets

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 6 years ago

vigmeister writes "I joined the netbook bandwagon early this year in a rather odd fashion by picking up an outdated portable tablet (Fujitsu P1510) which just about matches the latest greatest netbooks for their performance and portability features while nipping them by managing to be a tablet and give me a better battery life. I have been happy using XP Tablet on this machine until recently when I have started feeling that by optimizing the OS for targeted use, I may be able to squeeze more out of the device. I don't see very many netbooks or ultraportables around me, so I ask slashdot these questions that are probably useful for a large userbase here :
1) What OS would you recommend for a netbook/outdated laptop? Usage is typically light — web surfing (with multimedia), email, word processing, spreadsheet and reading pdfs.
2) What OS would you recommend for a ultraportable tablet? Usage is similar to a netbook, but now we have a tablet on our hands. There's a little more document editing going on and good handwriting recognition and notetaking software would be great.
I would like for the user experience to be snappy on a computer that is essentially running the equivalent of a 1.2 GHz PIII with 512mb RAM. The other objective for both of these is to maximize the battery life as that is the major drawback of these ultraportables. A small memory footprint would work wonders since the hard drives on these devices are typically slow and completely suck the joy out of using them when swap space is being used. Any tips? If you are still using your outdated laptops/tablets productively, please share with us how you're doing so so we can too."
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Princeton investigated for reverse discrimination

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 6 years ago

vigmeister writes "
Do elite universities hold Asian-Americans to higher standards than other applicants? Do Ivy League schools set caps on the number of high-achieving minority students admitted, comparing Asian-American applicants against one another instead of the rest of the applicant pool? These questions were recently recharged by word that the Education Department will broaden its investigation of Princeton University's admissions process, a probe that began after an applicant filed a federal civil rights complaint saying the school spurned him because of his race.
Lot of top flight universities seem to be limiting numbers of Asian American students getting admitted. However, the specific student who filed a case against Princeton assumes that SAT scores and grades get you into college. What about all the essays, recommendations and extra-curricular activities that people harped on about when we applied to college? Does this discrimination affect students in certain fields more than others? Are students from the Indian subcontinent included in the category of "Asian American"? Incidentally, I am watching the Chinpokomon episode of South Park."

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PS3 Blu-ray disc readable on your PC

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 6 years ago

vigmeister writes "
Knowing that the PS3 games use Blu-ray discs, have you ever wondered about popping in one of your game discs into a Blu-ray drive on your PC to see if you could read it? Since Blu-ray drives are still really expensive, probably not. Even if you did have one it wouldn't do much good, unless you had a Lite-ON DH-401S that is.
This Lite-On Blu-ray drive that can read your PS3 game discs. Makes me question how strong the DRM on PS3 game discs is since Sony's gonna need all the DRM they can get."

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Shrink claims liberalism is a mental disorder

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 6 years ago

vigmeister writes "
Just when liberals thought it was safe to start identifying themselves as such, an acclaimed, veteran psychiatrist is making the case that the ideology motivating them is actually a mental disorder. "Based on strikingly irrational beliefs and emotions, modern liberals relentlessly undermine the most important principles on which our freedoms were founded," says Dr. Lyle Rossiter, author of the new book, "The Liberal Mind: The Psychological Causes of Political Madness." "Like spoiled, angry children, they rebel against the normal responsibilities of adulthood and demand that a parental government meet their needs from cradle to grave." While political activists on the other side of the spectrum have made similar observations, Rossiter boasts professional credentials and a life virtually free of activism and links to "the vast right-wing conspiracy."
When did the the line between professional opinions and personal convictions get blurred so?"

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Computers will match human intelligenc in 20 years

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 6 years ago

vigmeister writes "Ray Kurzweil predicts computers will match humans in intelligence by 2029.

He said machines and humans would eventually merge through devices implanted in the body to boost intelligence and health. "It's really part of our civilisation," Mr Kurzweil said. "But that's not going to be an alien invasion of intelligent machines to displace us." Machines were already doing hundreds of things humans used to do, at human levels of intelligence or better, in many different areas, he said.
An interesting argument I have heard about this topic is that he is in denial about his mortality and hopes that this is indeed the case so that he can prolong his existence virtually."

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Google restricts MGMaps from using their map tiles

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 7 years ago

vigmeister writes "MGMaps is a precariously named (from a trademark perspective) software for handhelds which serves up maps from the internet and allowing you to convert your phone into a crude GPS navigation device without the need for buying maps. As the name suggests, the primary source of their maps was Google Maps until yesterday, when the Google Enforcement Team sent them this email . The software intends to continue providing the software without using Google Maps, but says support will continue for maps from Microsoft, Yahoo, Ask.com and OpenStreetMap.org.

Given that Google Maps Mobile itself is available as a download for cell phones, MGMaps is a competing product and it seems to be a fair request on Google's part even though one feels for MGMaps which came out with a (free) product first. However, this would suggest that Google is taking mobile map software seriously enough to send in the 'Google Enforcement Team'. While not really an evil move by them, it will inconvenience the large userbase that had grown to adopt the software and substitute their GPS modules with software on their cell-phone as they will have to embark on a new learning curve."

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Wikipedia notes death before bodies found

vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 7 years ago

vigmeister writes "WWE wrestler Chris Benoit and his family were found dead in his house in Atlanta last weekend. Chris Benoit's wikipedia entry apparently declared his wife's death 13 hours before their bodies were found and the news was publicly released. This entry has an IP address from Connecticut where the WWE is headquartered. Conspiracy theory?"
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vigmeister vigmeister writes  |  more than 7 years ago

vigmeister writes "Steve Jobs' keynote address that lacked focus on new information about the iPhone or developments related to the iPod caused AAPL stocks to fall sharply. Leopard was the topic on Jobs's mind as he detailed features from Apple's latest OS which is due for release in October. Leopard's release is delayed in the wake of Apple moving resources to a successful iPhone launch. An interesting feature of Leopard will be the ability to switch between Windows and Mac OS without shutting down your computer."
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