×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Band Releases Album As Linux Kernel Module

viperidaenz Re:GPL? (81 comments)

None of the files in github mention any license at all.

4 hours ago
top

Band Releases Album As Linux Kernel Module

viperidaenz lossy compression is part of their 'sound'? (81 comments)

This repository contains the album's track data in source files, that (for complexity's sake) came from .ogg files that were encoded from .wav files that were created from .mp3 files that were encoded from the mastered .wav files which were generated from ProTools final mix .wav files that were created from 24-track analog tape.

So they went from wav -> mp3 -> wav.... for no good reason? Then down to what can only be assumed to be Vorbis.

4 hours ago
top

Face Recognition Algorithm Finally Outperforms Humans

viperidaenz Re:Epic Fail! (it's really an urban legend) (64 comments)

If you're looking for terrorists, it much worse than what you say.

How many terrorists are there really?
For arguments sake I'm going to say 10,000 in USA, with 320M population.
To get the number of false positives on the general population down to the number of real terrorists, so only 50% of the people you stop are innocent, you need a 99.996875% accurate test.

With 98.52 as claimed by this test, you'd have 4.7M false positives and 148 terrorists get false negatives.

12 hours ago
top

Face Recognition Algorithm Finally Outperforms Humans

viperidaenz Re:Easy to set up patsies. (64 comments)

Except I doubt 98% accuracy is admissible in court.

Say there are 320,000,000 people in a country, like USA.
If 5% of those people are criminals, that's 16,000,000 criminals.

With 98% accuracy against the 304,000,000 innocent civilians, that's 6,080,000 false positives, nearly half of the number of real criminals. That's only 62% change of successfully identifying a real criminal, despite a "98% accurate" test.

12 hours ago
top

Face Recognition Algorithm Finally Outperforms Humans

viperidaenz Cool (64 comments)

So to fool the face recognition of the future I just have to change the distance between the corners of my mouth.... by smiling or frowning?
If I perform all my crimes with a cheeky grin, they'll never match it to my frowny looking drivers license photo.

12 hours ago
top

How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

viperidaenz Re:Well. (189 comments)

Sapphire has a niche in high end LED flashlights, but if they are well engineered the sapphire is seated around the edge in elastomer and also recessed so no normal force is likely to ever be applied, which would act to bend it.

That's the problem with using it for cellphone screens, every mm counts. It needs to be thin, flat and large. It also needs to look good. When was the last time you saw an Apple product with a recessed screen?

12 hours ago
top

Intentional Backdoor In Consumer Routers Found

viperidaenz Re:Hardware backdoors in the actual CPUs ? (233 comments)

I do understand JTAG.
It would be trivial to set a flipflop to switch the compromised random bit stream to the real implementation when ever a command is send through the JTAG port and reset it on power-up.

Its flattering you think I'm a psyop operative. Truth is I'm just bored at work and you respond like a zealot. It's amusing.

yesterday
top

How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

viperidaenz Re:Well. (189 comments)

Looks like scratch resistence != shatter resistence.

Secondly, it means overcoming a surprising problem: despite its hardness, synthetic sapphire can be prone to fracturing, at almost any point in this finishing process, due to impurities or to the presence of unresolved strains in the crystalline structure.

“That’s something that’s being very carefully measured and tested,” says Stone-Sunderberg. “Fracturing is probably of the highest concern. If a product is released with a more expensive touch screen [cover] and consumers experience fracturing, they’re going to be highly disappointed. It would be devastating to the sapphire industry.”

Also, the tensile strength of regular glass (which varies considerably however) can match that of synthetic sapphire. Sapphire has very good compression stength though.
This is the reason for steel reinforced concrete. You can't easily compress concrete but you can pull it apart pretty easily. If you add steel with its good tensile strength, you get a strong material that excels in both areas.

Apple will need to do something with the sapphire or it will shatter with the slighest bend. Watch faces don't have this problem because they're relitively thick. You can't piss away millimetres in thickness and weight when it comes to the next gen smart phone.

yesterday
top

How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

viperidaenz Re:Anyone else notice (189 comments)

You can go from jack squat to anything with a billion dollars.
Especially when the rest of the industry isn't all that large.

yesterday
top

How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

viperidaenz Re:Well. (189 comments)

a metric shitton of sapphire

Exactly. Not one of those ill-defined imperial long shit tons and short shit tons.

yesterday
top

Tech People Making $100k a Year On the Rise, Again

viperidaenz Re:Sounds about right (191 comments)

Writing code is the best part. Why would you give that up? Age?
15 years ago I was in "high school"...

yesterday
top

Next-Gen Thunderbolt: Twice as Fast, But a Different Connector

viperidaenz Re:Intentional sabotage? (150 comments)

or like... 5 porn videos on two 4k screens and charge your laptop while you fap.

yesterday
top

Not Just a Cleanup Any More: LibreSSL Project Announced

viperidaenz Re:Or.. (343 comments)

How about if you want to fork OpenSSL, you do it.

If OpenBSD want to fork OpenSSL, let them and stop bitching about it.

yesterday
top

Next-Gen Thunderbolt: Twice as Fast, But a Different Connector

viperidaenz Re:Intentional sabotage? (150 comments)

I guess they thought it would be really handy for a single connector to provide 100W of power as well as enough bandwidth for pretty much everything you could attach to a laptop.

yesterday
top

Intentional Backdoor In Consumer Routers Found

viperidaenz Re:Hardware backdoors in the actual CPUs ? (233 comments)

which is... not trusting the implementation, not the architecture.
The complete opposite of what you said.

What information is available on a test port has nothing to do with the architecture.
Even if it was accessible via JTAG, what would stop them switching the random source when the JTAG port isn't in use?

yesterday
top

Tech People Making $100k a Year On the Rise, Again

viperidaenz Re:and yet the only jobs on Dice (191 comments)

recruiters just rattle off the buzzwords and acronyms the HR person told them to, who got those from talking to a manager.

yesterday

Submissions

viperidaenz hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

viperidaenz has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...