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Thousands of ICQ Numbers Deleted

wackymacs What's new? (264 comments)

All AOL seem to do is screw-up again and again these days. They must like bad publicity.

more than 7 years ago

Submissions

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How the Apple Retail Stores were Born

wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  about 7 years ago

wackymacs writes "During the mid-nineties, Mac users were prone to dealing with poorly-trained and ill-maintained Mac sections in big box computer and electronics stores. These environments did not foster customer loyalty nor did they help differentiate the Mac user-experience from Windows. After Steve Jobs returned to Apple, he began a concerted campaign to help sales by improving the presentation of Macs. This campaign culminated with the introduction of the Apple Stores in 2001."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Steve Jobs and several other Apple employees visited Brown University in early 1983 for a tour of their computing lab where they showed off brand new Apollo workstations. Andy van Dam was shown the Apple Macintosh 128k before its introduction. He told Jobs they were waiting for a "3M" machine (a term used in the 80s to describe a powerful computer that has at least one Megabyte of memory, a Million pixel display, and a Megaflop of processing power). At the time, Jobs didn't know what a megaflop was. After the Macintosh introduction in 1984, Steve Jobs' top priority was to create its successor, a 3M machine dubbed BigMac. Apple acquired a UNIX license from Unisoft, as Jobs planned to port Macintosh software to the UNIX platform. After Jobs left Apple in 1985 and was replaced by Jean-Louis Gasseé, the BigMac project was cancelled."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "LowEndMac has published an extensive interview with VisiCalc's co-developer, Dan Bricklin. The report covers the developer's early background, and the situation he faced when he helped create the application. "The idea that there would be a computer on every work desk was something we all knew should happen — but given the slow acceptance of computers for everyday use in the office over the years, we knew such penetration had many barriers," Bricklin explains. The report carries on to look at the history and surrounding events that affected development of the industry, and explains the tech industry innovator is now working on an online and Open Source spreadsheet application, to be called 'WikiCalc'."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "In an exclusive interview with Low End Mac, electronic spreadsheet inventor Dan Bricklin explains why Lotus 1-2-3 outsold VisiCalc, what he did before inventing the first electronic spreadsheet and talks about his latest project, WikiCalc."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Apple's venture into Internet-based services started in 1985 with AppleLink. After the explosive growth of the Macintosh in the late eighties, Apple was flush with cash, but had little strategy to guide its investments. eWorld was launched in 1994 as an eventual replacement for AppleLink. By 1995 the service had 115,000 members, compared to over 3 million subscribed to AOL. eWorld was shutdown in 1996, making this year the 10th anniversary of eWorld's demise. Apple ventured into Internet services again with iTools and .Mac in the 2000s."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Apple's venture into Internet-based services started in 1985 with AppleLink. After the explosive growth of the Macintosh in the late eighties, Apple was flush with cash, but had little strategy to guide its investments. eWorld was launched in 1994 as an eventual replacement for AppleLink. By 1995 the service had 115,000 members, compared to over 3 million subscribed to AOL. eWorld was shutdown in 1996. Apple ventured into Internet services again with iTools and .Mac in the 2000s."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Apple's venture into Internet-based services started in 1985 with AppleLink. After the explosive growth of the Macintosh in the late eighties, Apple was flush with cash, but had little strategy to guide its investments. Apple teamed with AOL, and eWorld was launched in 1994 as an eventual replacement for AppleLink. By 1995 the service had 115,000 members, compared to over 3 million subscribed to AOL. eWorld was shutdown in 1996. Apple ventured into Internet services again with iTools and .Mac in the 2000s."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Apple's venture into Internet-based services started in 1985 with AppleLink. After the explosive growth of the Macintosh in the late eighties, Apple was flush with cash, but had little strategy to guide its investments. eWorld was launched in 1994 as an eventual replacement for AppleLink. By 1995 the service had 115,000 members, compared to over 3 million subscribed to AOL. eWorld was shutdown in 1996. Apple ventured into Internet services again with iTools and .Mac in the 2000s."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Back in the mid-1990s, Apple was a company without focus. After the explosive growth of the Macintosh in the late eighties, Apple was flush with cash, but had little strategy to guide its investments. As a result, products like eWorld were developed while Apple's core products languished. Meant as a substitute to the very expensive AppleLink online service, eWorld was based on the AOL network, and presented a friendly face to several proprietary online services and limited internet connectivity. eWorld failed to gain much market share and was discontinued in 1996 under then-CEO Gil Amelio."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Back in the mid-nineties, Apple was a company without focus. After the explosive growth of the Macintosh in the late eighties, Apple was flush with cash, but had little strategy to guide its investments. As a result, products like eWorld were developed while Apple's core products languished. Meant as a substitute to the very expensive AppleLink online service, eWorld was based on the AOL network, and presented a friendly face to several proprietary online services and limited internet connectivity. eWorld failed to gain much of a foothold in the market, and was discontinued in 1996 under Gil Amelio."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "eWorld was Apple's short-lived group of online services. Launched in June 1994, eWorld was an intuitive, easy-to-use, and heavily GUI-dependent new way to take advantage of the Internet. It included its own email service, bulletin board system (BBS), and more. It was shutdown in 1996, making this year the 10th anniversary of eWorld's demise."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "2006 marks the 10th anniversary of eWorld's demise. eWorld was Apple's short-lived group of online services which were launched in 1994 and shut down in 1996. eWorld was a new intuitive, easy-to-use, and heavily GUI-dependent way to take advantage of the Internet. It included its own email service, bulletin board system (BBS), and more. Compared to AOL, eWorld failed massively, mainly because of a lack of marketing and advertising, and its high price."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Andy Hertzfeld was a key member of the original Macintosh team in 1984. He joined Apple in 1979 and was responsible for many parts of the original Macintosh system software. Hertzfeld left Apple in 1984 and has since cofounded three companies; Radius (1986), General Magic (1990), and Eazel (1999). Today, he works at Google as a software engineer."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Andy Hertzfeld was a key member of the original Macintosh team in 1984. He joined Apple in 1979 and was responsible for many parts of the original Macintosh system software. Hertzfeld left Apple in 1984 and has since cofounded three companies; Radius (1986), General Magic (1990), and Eazel (1999). Today, he works at Google as a software engineer. In the interview he talks about his time at Apple, and why he joined and left the company."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "Software Wizard Andy Hertzfeld talks about his time at Apple in the 80s. He was a key member of the original Macintosh team in 1984, and originally joined Apple in 1979. He was responsible for many parts of the original Macintosh system software. Since leaving Apple in 1984, he has co-founded three companies; Radius (1986), General Magic (1990), and Eazel (1999). Today, he works at Google as a software engineer."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "The Apple III was meant to be Apple's bold entry into the business market; it ended as their first commercial failure, losing them $60 million, and put the company into financial uncertainty. It was also responsible for the start of both the Lisa and Macintosh projects."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "This year marks the 26th anniversary of Apple's first failure, the Apple III. The Apple III was meant to be Apple's bold entry into the business market; it ended out putting the company into financial uncertainty. The Apple III was the first Apple computer not designed by Steve Wozniak, and was Apple's most sophisticated computer up until 1983. They later attempted the business market again with the Apple Lisa in 1983 only to fail again, this time owing to the Lisa's $11,000 price tag and several technical problems."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "This year marks 26 years since Apple's first failure with the Apple III. Due to its badly designed chassis, the Apple III over-heated, and was a spectacular commercial failure, losing Apple $60 million. Although Apple should have learned lessons from the chaos the Apple III caused, they later attempted the business market again with the Apple Lisa in 1983 only to fail again, this time owing to the Lisa's $11,000 price tag and several technical problems."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

wackymacs (865437) writes "This year marks 26 years since Apple's first failure with the Apple III. The project was started in 1978, and ended out as a commercial failure, losing Apple $60 million. The chassis had major faults, and the computer did not have a cooling fan because Steve Jobs believed they were "too noisy and inelegant". The chassis was a single, heavy aluminum piece with the power supply enclosed in the left section; it had no ventilation of its own. Although Apple should have learned lessons from the chaos the Apple III caused, they later attempted the business market again with the Apple Lisa in 1983 only to fail again, this time owing to the Lisa's $11,000 price tag and several technical problems."
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wackymacs wackymacs writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Joshua Coventry writes "Apple had known nothing but success with its Apple II product line, but when it tried to enter the business world with the Apple III, they learned the cost of failure. The Apple III was meant to be Apple's bold entry into the business market; it ended as Apple's first commercial failure and put the company into financial uncertainty. It was also responsible for sprouting both the Lisa and Macintosh projects, efforts that would save Apple. The Apple III project started in late 1978 under the management of Dr. Wendell Sander, with the internal code-name Sara (named after Sander's daughter). The project was mainly started because Apple didn't believe its highly successful Apple II line would maintain its popularity. Although Apple should have learned lessons from the chaos the Apple III caused, they later attempted the business market again with the Apple Lisa in 1983 only to fail again, this time owing to the Lisa's $11,000 price tag and several technical problems."

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