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U.S. Gas Stations Vulnerable To Internet Attacks

weilawei Re:Once more (100 comments)

Pay a decent wage and you'll get better candidates. Gas station attendants are generally part-time, no benefits, minimum wage, not paid nearly enough to give a shit in a dead-end job. You get what you pay for.

4 days ago
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Scientists Slow the Speed of Light

weilawei Re:Really Neat (139 comments)

That was the point of my comment. I stated what had been done previously and then moved on to the new work.

4 days ago
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Scientists Slow the Speed of Light

weilawei Really Neat (139 comments)

This is incredibly cool. Previous work has managed to fully stop light, but this is quite a finding (that light can travel slower through a vacuum).

The old stuff, from Wiki:

In 1998, Danish physicist Lene Vestergaard Hau led a combined team from Harvard University and the Rowland Institute for Science which succeeded in slowing a beam of light to about 17 meters per second,[1] and researchers at UC Berkeley slowed the speed of light traveling through a semiconductor to 9.7 kilometers per second in 2004. Hau later succeeded in stopping light completely, and developed methods by which it can be stopped and later restarted.

However, now we can alter the structure of the beam of light and measure a slowdown (from the abstract):

Our work highlights that, even in free space, the invariance of the speed of light only applies to plane waves. Introducing spatial structure to an optical beam, even for a single photon, reduces the group velocity of the light by a readily measurable amount.

Details from the pre-print:

We use an ultraviolet laser incident upon a beta-barium borate (BBO) crystal to produce photon pairs with central wavelength at 710 nm. The photons, called signal and idler, pass through an interference filter of spectral bandwidth 10 nm and are collected by polarization-maintaining, single-mode fibers. One fiber is mounted on an axial translation stage to control the path length (Fig. 2A). The idler photon goes through polarization maintaining fibers before being fed to the input port of a fiber-coupled beam splitter (Fig. 2B) (17). Instead of going straight to the other beam splitter input, the signal photon is propagated through a free-space section (Fig. 2C). This consists of fiber-coupling optics to collimate the light and two spatial light modulators (SLMs). SLMs are pixelated, liquid-crystal devices that can be encoded to act as diffractive optical elements implementing axicons, lenses and similar optical components. The first SLM can be programmed to act as a simple diffraction grating such that the light remains collimated in the intervening space, or programmed to act as an element to structure the beam (e.g. axicons or lenses with focal length ). The second SLM, placed at a distance 2, reverses this structuring so that the light can be coupled back into the single-mode fiber that feeds to the other input port of the beam splitter. The output ports of the fiber-coupled beam splitter are connected to single-photon detectors, which in turn feed a gated counter (Fig. 2D). The coincident count rate is then recorded as a function of path difference between the signal and idler arms. The position of the HOM dip is recorded as a function of the spatial shaping of the signal photon.

4 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

weilawei Re:Slashdot full of hypochondriacs? (660 comments)

Even better. I was a military brat. During my childhood, I lived overseas and in various locations around the US (both coasts, north and south, rainy/wet/cold, hot/dry, and hot/wet).

You know how people go to college and get sick because they're exposed to new infectious agents? (I'm steering heavily into <anecdote> territory here, take it with some salt.) I don't recall an excess of children being sick after transferring in, nor do I remember getting a major illness, with one exception. One of the couple times I got the flu was immediately after moving (we were still in billeting). That said, it was still rare overall to get sick.

I often wonder if moving frequently and receiving vaccinations for everything under the sun (military requirements) helped. But I can't really say. Perhaps the extensive and thorough vaccination did reduce the numbers of sick people, but I don't have data to say either way.</anecdote>

4 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

weilawei Re:Slashdot full of hypochondriacs? (660 comments)

Sure, I got the flu a couple times (in my childhood). Sure I had ear aches (however, I have serious ear problems, resulting in multiple surgeries and my being nearly deaf). But: athletes foot? migraines? frequent sore throats and pink eye? pneumonia? Nope, none of it.

I certainly didn't get the flu every year and I definitely didn't get most of the stuff you listed. I've been quite healthy, with the minor exception of the ears being useless. The CDC's own stats support this, with only roughly 20-30% of specimens tested being positive for influenza. That's not "most people". It's significant, sure, but it isn't "most people" and it's definitely not "most people every year".

I think you might consider getting your hypochondria checked out.

5 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

weilawei Re:Slashdot full of hypochondriacs? (660 comments)

I was sick often as a child. Flu every year, pnuemonia once, numerous ear aches, athletes foot, migraines, frequent sore throats, pink eye.... just like most kids.

Someone really didn't want to go to school. I can't speak for you, but I don't recall being sick all the time "just like most kids". As I recall it, most kids were healthy most of the time.

5 days ago
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Apple Agrees To Chinese Security Audits of Its Products

weilawei Re:Absolutely fair.. (114 comments)

I can't really answer that, since I don't have any information on their internals, thus, I'd be speculating. I was merely pointing out what the GP appeared to be saying.

Do I agree with the GP? No idea. It's rather difficult to pass judgement on things without any actual details. I'd prefer to skip speculation and just wait for the results.

5 days ago
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Apple Agrees To Chinese Security Audits of Its Products

weilawei Re:Absolutely fair.. (114 comments)

I believe the GP was suggesting that the phrase "security audit" was being used in a euphemistic manner.

5 days ago
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Dish Network Violated Do-Not-Call 57 Million Times

weilawei Re:Suitable Penalties Need To Be Given (240 comments)

What about the employees breaking the law? Are they permitted to release them? Alter their policy of violating the law?

Nitpicking aside, I wholly agree. Although, the idea of forcing them to continue telemarketing and then siphoning them dry does seem somewhat appealing...

5 days ago
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FBI Says Search Warrants Not Needed To Use "Stingrays" In Public Places

weilawei Re:Someone please aware me: (303 comments)

That's how they work.

about three weeks ago
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Google Hopes To One Day Replace Gmail With Inbox

weilawei Re:"Ultimately, our users will decide" (239 comments)

If they drop Gmail and don't replace it with something suitably similar and I don't get to keep my email, that'll be the end of a 10ish year run for me.

Sad times. I really do like their email service (and google voice).

about 2 months ago
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The Fastest Camera Ever Made Captures 100 Billion Frames Per Second

weilawei Re:light speed (122 comments)

So, about 25 MPH (that's 40 km/h or 11m/s for the rest of you). First Harvard and Rowland got it down to 17 m/s and then Lene Vestergaard Hau figured out how to stop and restart it entirely.

TL;DR: Mission accomplished.

about 2 months ago
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Windows 10 To Feature Native Support For MKV and FLAC

weilawei Re:Rather late (313 comments)

You are beyond clueless and out of touch with society.

That must be why Apple's best selling MP3 players are the smaller capacity ones (by far), such as the shuffle, nano, and mini. I think it's you who needs to get in touch with reality. There's clearly a business case for MP3 players which don't hold an entire music collection--which was my only point.

Fucking moron.

about 2 months ago
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Windows 10 To Feature Native Support For MKV and FLAC

weilawei Re:300 second buffer to hold an entire song (313 comments)

Maybe 50-60 per week is plenty. The smaller iPods (nano, mini, shuffle) are among the best selling MP3 players out there. Having a huge capacity isn't everything to everyone.

Not everyone needs to or wants to put their entire library on an MP3 player at once, therefore, MP3 players do not "exist for the sole purpose of holding my entire collection". I replied to a person who made that exact argument, and it's demonstrably false. You only need 1 example to prove it false, and there's plenty of people out there who don't store their entire collection on an MP3 player. QED.

That was my only point, and you've totally whooshed on it.

about 2 months ago
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Debian Forked Over Systemd

weilawei Okay, this is a great idea (647 comments)

But that website is atrocious suck. Top AND bottom panes which don't move and serve no purpose other than to obscure the window? What the hell is this shit?

about a month ago
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Windows 10 To Feature Native Support For MKV and FLAC

weilawei Re:300 second buffer to hold an entire song (313 comments)

You're a fucking moron. I give up. Not only do you lack reading comprehension, but you STILL missed the one and only main point that there exist multiple reasons to use an MP3 player. MP3 players do not "exist for the sole purpose of holding all my music" (where you must substitute every member of the MP3-player using population for the word "my"). The mere fact that there exist ANY other reasons to use an MP3 player invalidate that argument.

Jesus mothereffin' christ on a pogo stick. I've met rocks smarter than you.

about a month ago
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Security Experts Believe the Internet of Things Will Be Used To Kill Someone

weilawei When is the first murder? (165 comments)

Similarly, Rashmi Knowles, chief security architect at RSA, imagines criminals hacking into medical devices, recently blogged about hackers using pacemakers to blackmail users, and asked: "Question is, when is the first murder?"

Shortly after you fuckers took a $10M bribe to weaken your security. It would be the icing on the cake if someone died because of that.

about a month ago
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Windows 10 To Feature Native Support For MKV and FLAC

weilawei Re:300 second buffer to hold an entire song (313 comments)

As I just stated, it's not that bloody hard for me. I SAID that it might be for YOU, but it ISN'T for ME. How hard is that? FFS, reading comprehension. I'll quote the line again for you, since you seem challenged:

Your tastes may shift so rapidly in a given week that you need access to everything, but mine change more slowly, thus I don't need to carry as much music in a given week to make sure I can listen to what I want to hear.

Do you see it this time? Do you need glasses?

about a month ago
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Windows 10 To Feature Native Support For MKV and FLAC

weilawei Re:Rather late (313 comments)

You whooshed the point. I made two examples of reasons you could want to use an MP3 player for the purpose of showing that the argument "the SOLE purpose of an MP3 player is the hold ALL my music" is false when applied to a population. Nothing more.

Nitpicking at the fine points of particular CD players doesn't invalidate the argument, it just completely ignores the main thrust of it. I'm sure you can come up with a dozen other reasons to use an MP3 player. You must be at least that smart... I hope.

about 2 months ago
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Windows 10 To Feature Native Support For MKV and FLAC

weilawei Re:300 second buffer to hold an entire song (313 comments)

That's fine if you just use music for background noise or for pacing exercise

By that, you've demonstrated that an MP3 player does not exist solely to hold all of a music collection, and can, in fact, still be useful without holding all of a collection, meaning the argument that "the sole purpose of an MP3 player is to hold all my music" is false when applied to an entire population. That's what I gave 2 examples of other uses in order to debunk.

not so fine if you end up wanting to play a specific song in a specific circumstance

Who says I don't want to play a specific piece of music in a specific circumstance? I make a playlist, and hit forward and back to switch songs. That sure seems like playing a specific piece of music in a specific circumstance. It may not be the UI you like, but that's down to personal preference. Your tastes may shift so rapidly in a given week that you need access to everything, but mine change more slowly, thus I don't need to carry as much music in a given week to make sure I can listen to what I want to hear.

My point was that there are a myriad of reasons to use an MP3 player. I used two examples to demonstrate this.

Saying that the "entire purpose of an MP3 player is to hold ALL your music" is the argument I was debunking. The instant you come up with a reason to use an MP3 player besides "holding ALL your music", you've proven that argument false. I merely supplied two examples. It was intended to illustrate nothing more than the falsity of that argument.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Damage Already Done, FTDI Responds

weilawei weilawei writes  |  about 3 months ago

weilawei (897823) writes "Today, FTDI, a Scottish manufacturer of USB-to-serial ICs, posted a response to the ongoing debacle over its allegedly intentional bricking of competitors' chips. In their statement, FTDI CEO Fred Dart said, "The recently release driver release has now been removed from Windows Update so that on-the-fly updating cannot occur. The driver is in the process of being updated and will be released next week. This will still uphold our stance against devices that are not genuine, but do so in a non-invasive way that means that there is no risk of end user’s hardware being directly affected." This may have resulted from a discussion with Microsoft engineers about the implications of distributing potentially malicious driver software.

If you design hardware, what's your stance on this? Will you continue to integrate FTDI chips into your products? What alternatives are available to replace their functionality?"

Link to Original Source
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Basecamp Stores Your Passwords in Plaintext

weilawei weilawei writes  |  more than 5 years ago

weilawei (897823) writes "Basecamp stores your password in plaintext. To see this, click on "My info" and then remove "edit" from the URL.

This opens up huge opportunities for exploits when people are away from their desk or when your password is emailed (instead of reset, as is appropriate). Not everyone uses a different password for every wesbsite."
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Secure Tunneling in OS X

weilawei weilawei writes  |  more than 6 years ago

weilawei (897823) writes "I spend a lot of time on public wifi but I don't want people sniffing my traffic. How would I tunnel all my traffic, including DNS, to a remote server (using OpenSSH) under OS X? Specific browsers (e.g., Firefox) can be forced to defer DNS resolution to the remote host, but this isn't a viable option for every application. The proxy options in System Preferences appear to leak DNS requests, so the built-in client isn't an option either."

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