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Comments

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Sneaky Microsoft Add-On Put Firefox Users At Risk

whitehatlurker Re:Sabotage? (333 comments)

Yeah - the fact that MicroSoft screwed up on security is not news, but that someone is writing an Algol compiler (58/60/68 not withstanding) should be front page material on slashdot.

What's up with that?

more than 4 years ago
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Gigantic Air Gun To Blast Cargo Into Orbit

whitehatlurker Re:Gerald Bull (384 comments)

I find your signature somewhat ironic - they did take the sky from Bull, didn't they?

more than 4 years ago
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Last.fm User Data Was Sent To RIAA By CBS

whitehatlurker Re:The death of Last.fm? (334 comments)

I'm not sure what you mean by a "release group" but suspect you mean illegal distribution. The fingerprint is of the first few seconds of the audio of the file. A legal download from emusic or itunes or amazon has the same fingerprint.

.

Unless the RIAA subtly change the music to fingerprint every CD uniquely, and then track from the point of sale with your information and watch for that fingerprint on the internet. (Dang, haven't quite got the conspiracy theory thing down quite yet!)

more than 4 years ago
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Last.fm User Data Was Sent To RIAA By CBS

whitehatlurker Re:The death of Last.fm? (334 comments)

If the story is false, who will read TechCrunch again?
...
Actually, quite a few people, I guess. The attraction of this sort of thing for certain people is a "well known fact" as they say. It is relatively easy to post things and enjoy the notority they bring. I'm not saying it would ever happen on /., but you never know where else this might happen.

I'm not sure that using a TechCrunch story to verify a TechCrunch story is any sort of unbiased confirmation. Also, a picture of an email is not the type of "proof" that I'd be willing to accept from anyone I knew personally, let alone a provocative website.

more than 4 years ago
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EU Could Force Bundling Firefox With Windows

whitehatlurker Re:And What of the Others? (650 comments)

Well, no. Amaya has never been useful as a primary browser. ;-)

(Unless it changed really significantly with release 11.)

With MathML coming into other browsers - okay, it came into Opera - I really don't see anything to promote Amaya any more.

more than 5 years ago
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Opera 10 Alpha 1 Released, Aces Acid 3 Test

whitehatlurker Re:Meh.. (258 comments)

Other features include a spell checker and auto updating.

Firefox had this years ago, seriously is this accurate, Opera just got these?

This is somewhat inaccurate. Opera has had spell check for some time. (Can't recall how long, sorry.) The new part is that checking is done in-line, as you type. (I think I prefer the spell check on demand version.)

As well, Opera will currently check for updates periodically. The new auto-update is done for you, without you needing to confirm the update. (Again, I think I prefer the old way.)

more than 5 years ago
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Google Chrome Tops Browser Speed Tests

whitehatlurker Re:What's up with the Opera score? (371 comments)

Yeah, it's the fastest gets 10 points, no matter if the gap is huge, like Chrome on that V8 benchmark or almost non-existent like those flash crabs. I'd say Chrome should get the full ten on the V8 and the rest should have had some sort of prorating.

As someone said in this thread Opera bashing is always popular. If you comment that a great number of the Firefox addons are there to compensate for features that Opera has, but Firefox out-of-the-box lacks, you get modded to oblivion. Try saying that Chrome's tendancy to phone home is creepy. (Has that been fixed? I de-installed it as soon as I saw what was happening when I typed in the address bar and will not install it until that is off by default.)

more than 5 years ago
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Oldest Nuclear Family Found Murdered In Germany

whitehatlurker Re:Cluedo (186 comments)

No, then the title would be Stone Age Library Found. Artificial lights used to provide illumination for clients. Apparently, librarians enforced the "SHHH!" rules very vigorously, almost in a military fashion.

more than 5 years ago
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Oldest Nuclear Family Found Murdered In Germany

whitehatlurker Re:How the heck.. (186 comments)

Also, was this a fission or fusion type nuclear family?

more than 5 years ago
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Mars Rover "Spirit" In Danger

whitehatlurker Well, ... (222 comments)

All I have to say is that I am now dis-Spirit-ed. I hope you Martian dust storms are happy. (/Sulks)

more than 5 years ago
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Circuit City Files For Bankruptcy

whitehatlurker Can't blame Canada (574 comments)

"The Source by Circuit City" formerly RadioShack, in Canada, has filed for protection as well, mostly due to the (lack of) performance by the parent (American) company.

The Canadian operation has "good strong sales and good earnings over the last several quarters"
the Canadian subsidiary had no choice but to seek the court's protection, which he said "was triggered by the filing in the United States."

Perhaps, "Blame the US" should be invoked? :-)

more than 5 years ago
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AVG Virus Scanner Removes Critical Windows File

whitehatlurker Calm down (440 comments)

Yeah, it's false positive, and one that should have been caught well before the update was made. So? I have an F-Secure version that insists Adobe Acroreader is part of some kind of nefarious plot, and has for several releases of their update files.

Pretty much every AV software has had false positives. This one is somewhat funny in that this false positive hit an important part of MicroSoft's operating system, but if it weren't for that, this would not be newsworthy.

If people didn't react with such a vigorous knee-jerk when their software detects a "virus" (ZOMG! burn the computer - it's InFeCTed!), things would be better. I like how TFA suggests disconnecting your computer so that AVG can't update ...

more than 5 years ago
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Old Malware Tricks Still Defeat Most AV Scanners

whitehatlurker Old Jedi Malware Tricks (122 comments)

These0x00are0x00not0x00the0x00softwares0x00you0x00are0x00scanning0x00for.

more than 5 years ago
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How Vampire Bats Evolved To Live On Blood Alone

whitehatlurker BATS? Yawn. (82 comments)

Bats are old hat - vampire moths are the next wave.

(Oblig. Wikipedia reference.)

Granted, a moth costume is more difficult to make for Halloween.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  about 8 years ago

whitehatlurker (867714) writes "Science Daily reports that a group of physicists from Arizona have developed a method of buidling a transistor using a single molecule (on the scale of one nanometer).

Unfortunately, these won't be available off the shelf for a while:
Even if it were possible to build an ultra-advanced laptop computer with molecule-sized transistors using current transistor technology, it would take a city's worth of electricity to run the laptop, and the thing would get so hot it would probably vaporize.
"

Journals

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Profs draw in Texas Creation Showdown

whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 6 years ago Several biology professors have signed a letter [PDF] supporting Chris Comer. Comer recently resigned as Texas' director of science education, purportedly under duress resulting from her advertisement of a talk on evolution. The letter says in part that the state has a "duty to keep intelligent design out of public school science classes."

The faculty members come from across the state, including secular and religious institutions. The action by these profs follows support for Comer from Babara Forrest, the presenter of that talk.

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  about 8 years ago Science Daily reports that a group of physicists from Arizona have developed a method of building a transistor using a single molecule (on the scale of one nanometer).

Unfortunately, these won't be available off the shelf for a while:

Even if it were possible to build an ultra-advanced laptop computer with molecule-sized transistors using current transistor technology, it would take a city's worth of electricity to run the laptop, and the thing would get so hot it would probably vaporize.

On the other hand these guys are a bit over the top:

"We're not futurists at all and can't predict it, but imagine that you could make an artificial intelligence, that you could have this little submarine that goes inside somebody's arteries and capillaries to repair them," Stafford said.

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago Strange, but Opera and Firefox issued updates within minutes of each other today. (Or at least I received notice from each within minutes of each other.)

Opera's changelog offers little surprise - mostly annoyance fixes and NTLM support improvements. Firefox' changelog is rather cryptic: "Fixed an issue with playing Windows Media content".

What's next? Will MS ship IE 7.0 today, too?

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago Another MicroSoft Office unpatched ("zero day") vulnerability is being exploited in a Chinese-language PowerPoint presentation. (The topic of this presentation is sex.)

Several articles are available online about this, some pointing out that MicroSoft has been patching Office heavily in the past short while. The Washington Post remarks that "And if all of this Office craziness has you spooked, you might consider switching over to OpenOffice."

Note that OpenOffice was recently patched to fix security holes. (So it is secure for a while.)

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago The University of Alaska reports the discovery of a new genus of primates - Rungwecebus - and a species within that genus - Rungwecebus kipunji.

The species is "critically endangered", and combines traits found in two other genera of monkey.

This also appears in Science Express. (Subscription may be required.)

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago Dave Korn announced on the Full Disclosure and Bugtraq security lists that Microsoft is bypassing local lookups for some hosts, meaning that you can't locally block some sites through your HOSTS file. All of these sites are MicroSoft controlled sites.

The general feeling in the rest of the thread is that this was to obfuscate these hosts and prevent them from being blocked by malware. However, there are no non-MicroSoft hosts listed, giving a competitive advantage for MicroSoft's anti-malware tools over other brands.

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago The SOHO/MDI Stanford team have recently announced success in improving the acoustical imaging of the farside of the Sun. (Yes, in space no one can hear you ...) The process uses helioseismicity to determine what active spots are doing on the other side of the Sun. They even provide a viewer to see what is going on.

The idea behind this is to alert Earth bound observers of sunspot activity which may form on the farside during the 13 day period it is masked. Theoretically, we won't be surprised when the spots swing around to our side. This may give us time to prepare for severe solar weather.

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago Opera has announce the inclusion of BitTorrent support in the next release of the Opera browser, 9.0. The next technical preview of 9.0 (TP2) will provide a way for users to try this out before the final release.

While a previous technical preview of version 8.x had this feature, BitTorrent had not been incorporated in the main releases.

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago UCLA announces that a process involving Raman spectroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy has enabled researchers to take three dimensional pictures of fossils that have been embedded in solid stone for over 650 million years. It also permits characterisation of the chemical structures of the fossil.

As the process is non-destructive and can image microscopic fossils (such as bacteria) with (formerly) soft tissues, there is speculation that this could be used on a mission to Mars to examine sediments there for evidence of life.

This work will appear in the next issue of Astrobiology. Previous work has appeared in Geobiology.

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago As reported in The Reg, the Russian stock exchange (RTS) was forced to stop trading between 13:15 and 14:20 GMT on Feb 2nd. The problem was that an infected computer on their network was generating too much traffic, overloading their routers. (There are reports that this may have been an intentional attack.)

The fix was to turn off the infected machine.

I'm sure there is a pun in there about post-Soviet Russia, viruses and stocks.

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago The BBC reports on a study of skulls presented in the British Dental Journal.

There were three sets of skulls compared: a group which died of bubonic plague in London (circa 1348); another group which died during the sinking of the "Mary Rose" in 1545; and a third group of modern folk (from dental radiographs).

The main points of the study were that human skulls were changing, particularly with respect to the area near the mandible (previously studied), but also with respect to the "cranial vault" which is representative of the volume of the frontal lobe of the brain, which in turn is thought to influence intelligence.

Seeing that the groups were all British, will this discovery change the number of Britons who believe in intelligent design?

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whitehatlurker whitehatlurker writes  |  more than 8 years ago University of Chicago archeologists report discovering a city on the Syrian/Iraqi border. The city was destroyed about 55 centuries ago by a war. Quotes from the story:

"The team found extensive destruction with collapsed walls, which had undergone heavy bombardment by sling bullets and eventually collapsed in an ensuing fire."

And of course, "This was 'Shock and Awe' in the Fourth Millennium B.C."

Pictures are available for the curious. Check out the sling bullets.

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