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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

whoever57 Re:Naive to say the least. (253 comments)

Yes, I goofed. However, believing that 11.4 years is what you'll get in practice is also naive,

Not, it's not your basic conversion error that's the problem.

A MTBF of 11.4 years does not mean that a typical array will have a lifetime of 11.4 years. From Wikipedia:

You are conflating "useful life period" with MTBF. They measure different things.

2 days ago
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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

whoever57 Re:Naive to say the least. (253 comments)

mean time to failure (MTTF) of 100,000 hours.

100,000 hours = 273 years. Does anyone believe that?

You don't understand the meaning of MTBF.

2 days ago
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Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

whoever57 Re:I would love to, but that server is a soup Nazi (253 comments)

So I tried to view the PDF, and it says "can't use the plugin, it causes problems on our server".

Maybe they have problems with their disk array?

But seriously, I had no problems downloading the document from the orginal site.

2 days ago
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Ed Felten: California Must Lead On Cybersecurity

whoever57 Re:Yeah, that didn't happen in California (80 comments)

Yeah, it was Texas where that happened, not California, right?

Yeah, it was California where employees were able to sue employers for such collusion. Good luck with that in some other states, where what Apple, Google, etc. did is just business as usual.

5 days ago
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Ed Felten: California Must Lead On Cybersecurity

whoever57 Re:california is a joke (80 comments)

They have the stupidest, most intrusive laws that negatively impact every other state.

You are welcome to your state where a lack of laws allows employers to restrict your opportunities to change jobs. Yeah, welcome to your overlords who use the lack employee protection to push your income down.

5 days ago
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Ed Felten: California Must Lead On Cybersecurity

whoever57 Re:california is a joke (80 comments)

NOTHING is going to happen in California. Their budget is a joke. They have a double digit sales tax rate and the biggest deficit out of every state

Perhaps you should come up to date on California's budget situation. Even if California had the biggest deficit in the past, California has the largest economy of any state, by a wide margin, making everything relating to finances bigger in California than any other state.

California doesn't even have the highest sales tax rate.

5 days ago
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Bomb Threats Via Twitter Partly Shut Down Atlanta's Hartsfield Airport

whoever57 Re:Other than the obligatory security theatre... (110 comments)

I assume that the plane was rerouted on a pretty much direct route from where they were to Atlanta. They'd want to make sure that the airplane stayed over relatively unpopulated areas in the event of an explosion.

And if it strays off its assigned route? Do you really think they are going to shoot it down?

about a week ago
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China Cuts Off Some VPNs

whoever57 Re:Well (216 comments)

This "danger" keeps violent crime at less than 1/7 the level of UK, comparing New York to London (similar population, similar percentage of "bad" minorities, etc).

Where did you get that BS from? Fox News?

Hint, I think that you have the ratio the wrong way round.

about a week ago
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China Cuts Off Some VPNs

whoever57 Re:Defective by design. (216 comments)

It doesn't help that most VPNs are so easy to detect and block at the IP header level. PPTP depends on the GRE IP protocol (47), and L2TP is usually tunneled over IPSec, which depends on the ESP IP protocol (50). By using different protocol numbers in the IP headers, the designers of these protocols made it mindlessly easy to block them, and made them harder to support, because routers have to explicitly know how to handle those nonstandard protocol numbers.

The last time that I was in China (a couple of years ago), OpenVPN using non-standard ports to my private server was blocked. In the end, I ran OpenVPN over tcp/22 (yes, ugly and slow, but it worked). I don't understand why VPN's were blocked but not SSH. OpenVPN uses UDP (by default), so no obvious protocol numbers to block.

about a week ago
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Verizon About To End Construction of Its Fiber Network

whoever57 Re:Why lay fiber at all when you can gouge wireles (200 comments)

Competition is great. For the customer. For awhile. Not so good for the businesses that are competing. Perhaps you've heard of the term "dumping"? That's when a "competitor" can afford to sell below cost just to drive his competition out of business. Great for the customer, until the competition goes away and prices go back up.

We used to have a great small local magazine shop in this town. Borders moved in. They had books and magazines and a coffee shop and ... all in one place. The local shop was driven out of business. Bad for them. Then Borders lost the competition with B&N (and Amazon) and they have now gone away. It's an hour drive to the closest full-service shop. This competition turned out just great for the local shop, Borders, and the customers in this town, didn't it?

It wasn't competition from a direct competitor that drove Borders out of town, it was a technological revolution. Ask youself if you would be better off riding round in a horse-pulled buggy, or in a car. Your argument above applies directly.

But yeah, there are natural monopolies. That's why we have regulated utilities, such as PG&E.

The cable and phone companies benefitted from sweatheart deals to install their connections in cities, yet they would scream in outrage at the prospect of a new competitor getting a similar sweatheart deal to bring in service.

about a week ago
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Tracking Down How Many (Or How Few) People Actively Use Google+

whoever57 Re:Buy Facebook. (209 comments)

My 70 year old mother and all of her friends use Facebook instead of the phone now.

Exactly, your kids are probably reconsidering their use of Facebook and are transitioning to other venues.

about two weeks ago
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The Current State of Linux Video Editing

whoever57 Re:Attitudes (223 comments)

This.

I used to use Kino, but this doesn't work on 64-bit. I believe the developer has transferred his efforts to Kdenlive. Kino worked well, but required format conversion in most cases.

All I want is an effective non-linear editor.

I have never managed to do anything with Cinelerra. Usually, it crashes within seconds of starting, but I haven't even figured out how to open a file containing video. The "documentation" (I use the word loosely) seems to assume that you have already opened the video.

Kdenlive seems to have possibility. Let's hope that it really progresses.

about two weeks ago
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A State-By-State Guide To Restrictive Community Broadband Laws

whoever57 Re:building municipal broadband is prohibited (160 comments)

I think many of us could agree that the "opinion" of the Supreme Court needs to be "revisited" in a number of areas these days.....

I agree with your opinion of the opinion of the Supreme Court, but there is a long line of decisions that underpin the Fed's ability to regulate almost anything. Expecting the Supreme Court to change its opinion on this topic is wishful thinking. It isn't going to happen any time soon.

about two weeks ago
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A State-By-State Guide To Restrictive Community Broadband Laws

whoever57 Re:building municipal broadband is prohibited (160 comments)

Hmmm.. So your argument is that because the internet crosses state and international boundaries the Fed is free to regulate it. The problem with this is that the commerce clause is about regulating TRADE as it crosses the boundaries between the states and other countries. The Fed can regulate, tax and otherwise control things that cross the state's border, but what happens within the state is the business of the state. The Fed has been justifying a LOT of things using the Commerce Clause, which are really pushing us into some very grey areas.

Please tell me why my interaction with my local phamacist is regulated by federal laws? Please tell me why I cannot grow marijuana for my personal consumption in my back yard? Both of these are because the Supreme Court does not agree with your interpretation of the Commerce Clause. Don't blame the Feds, blame the Supreme Court which has allowed the Fed to implement such laws and regulations.

So, my reading says that the Fed can regulate buying/selling (commerce) that crosses the state line over the internet, but if the state wants to regulate ISP's within it's borders, it is free to do so w/o Federal involvement as long as the state doesn't stray beyond it's constitutional power

Both your reading and my reading of the Commerce Clause carry zero weight. Only the opinion of the Supreme Court matters and it has made it quite clear that your reading does not agree with its view of the Commerce Clause.

about two weeks ago
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What Africa Really Needs To Fight Ebola

whoever57 Re:Traditions in Africa Leadership (83 comments)

Right. It has always been a tradition for the top tribal leader to line his and his family's pockets.

A traditional that has long been utilized by western economies.

about two weeks ago
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Eric Holder Severely Limits Civil Forfeiture

whoever57 Re:Waiting for Republicans to come in and defend t (316 comments)

The Republicans that are concerned about civil liberties (ie, those who didn't think about civil liberties when the patriot act was first signed, but have regretted it) will support this move.

Unfortunately, those Republicans don't exist. Well, to be more accurate, they exist, but not in any elected office.

about two weeks ago
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Eric Holder Severely Limits Civil Forfeiture

whoever57 Re:For the sake of discussion... (316 comments)

Hold them until until the owner/driver of the car has been successfully prosecuted and then sieze them.

about two weeks ago
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Steam For Linux Bug Wipes Out All of a User's Files

whoever57 Re:And that people... (329 comments)

Another person suggested creating a user that does backups, all it does is backups, and that user is the only one who has write access to the backup drive. That seems like a reasonable solution as well.

One could have a directory in the hierarchy above the backups that can only be executed by the root user. In this case, the backup directories and files below it can have normal user permissions, but the backup will not be accessible with normal user credentials.

about two weeks ago
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Google Releases More Windows Bugs

whoever57 Re:90 days is really long (263 comments)

Then they run that test as part of their automated "Test Windows" run (which probably takes hours to do)

I am going to nitpick on your analysis, but I have zero sympathy for Microsoft having (hypothetically) a test system that takes hours to provide a result. This is a company with billions of dollars available to it. Invest in more test hardware if the test systems take too long to run.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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The Koch brothers political network plans to spend almost $1B in 2016 elections

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  4 days ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "The Koch brothers revealed plans to spend $889M during the 2016 election cycle . The money would be spent on both congresisonal and presidential races. This level of spending will require commitment from both the Koch Brothers themselves and about 300 other donors. The money will put considerable pressure on Democratic supporters and candidates who will likely be at a considerable funding disadvantage in 2016."
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US Marshals flying cell tower spoofers on small planes.

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 3 months ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "The US Marshals Service is running cell tower spoofers on small planes. These devices are called "dirtboxes". The devices are made by Boeing Co. and can collect information from tens of thousands of cellphones in a single flight. When asked about the program, the US Justice department could neither confirm nor deny the reports."
Link to Original Source
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Comcast now intercepting and modifying web pages

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 3 months ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "On refreshing my user page on /., I just received a pop-up informing me that I need a new modem. I don't really need a new modem — it is just that Comcast would like to use my house as a wireless POP, providing WiFi service to anyone with a Comcast login.

Since I have wifi in my house, I have zero interest in providing a location from which Comcast can provide wireless service to all and sundry, so the pop-up was a little annoying.

Nevertheless, the wider issue is Comcase deploying technologies to monitor and modify http: requests on the fly.

Have other COmcast users on /. seen this?"
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Value of DMARC and DKIM

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 3 months ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "How widely is DKIM and DMARC being implemented? Some time ago, Yahoo implemented strict checks on DKIM before accepting email, breaking many mailing lists. However, Spamassassin actually assigns a positive score (more likely to be spam) to DKIM-signed emails, unless the signer domain matches the from domain. Some email marketing companies don't provide a way for emails to be signed with the sender's domain — instead, using their own domain to sign emails. DMARC doesn't seem to have a delegation mechanism, by which a domain owner could delegate other domains as acceptable signatures for emails their emails.

All of these issues suggest that the value of DKIM and DMARC is quite low, both as a mechanism to identify valid emails and as a mechanism to identify spam. In fact, spam is often dkim-signed.

Are /. users who manage email delivery actually using DKIM and DMARC?"
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Google takes the fight with Oracle to the Supreme Court

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 4 months ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "Google has asked the Supreme Court to review the issue of whether APIs can be copyrighted. Google beat Oracle in the trial court, where a judge with a software background ruled that APIs could not be copyrighted. but the Appeals court sided with Oracle, ruling that APIs can be copyrighted. Now Google is asking the Supreme Court to overturn that decision. "
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Fuel efficiency numbers overstate MPG more for cars with small engines.

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 4 months ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "All official numbers for fuel economy in the EU typically overstate the miles-per-gallon figure that drivers can expect to achieve in typical driving. A recent study confirmed this once again. However, what the study also found was that MPG figures are more urealistic for cars with smaller engines than for cars with larger engines. Actual MPG figures achieved based on typical drives for cars with small engines could be as much as 36% under the offical number, while those cars with 3 liter engines would typically achieve 15% less than the official figure."
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The world of fan fiction

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 6 months ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "The UK's Daily Telegraph has an interesting and somewhat balanced view of the world of fan fiction, providing an historical perspective, the different types of audiences and how different authors and publishers react to fan fiction. Of particular note, is how the author of Fifty Shades of Grey (originally a fan fiction based on the Twilight series) reacts to parties themed around the novel (not well). The article notes how some publishers and authors welcome fan fiction because it enables the original author to make more money."
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Layoffs coming at Microsoft?

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 7 months ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "Shaun Nichols at The Register interpets Satya Nadella's open letter as "prepare for layoffs". The letter suggests radical changes are coming to Microsoft and, combined with duplication of functions because of the Nokia handset business acquisition, he thinks that layoffs are highly likely. Wes Miller, research vice-president at Directions on Microsoft, says that Microsoft is shifting from the Windows-everywhere approach, towards supporting productivity applications on different platforms. More details will be forthcoming from Microsoft on July 22."
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Yetis: close relatives of ancient polar bears

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 7 months ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "A study of "Yeti" hair samples shows some interesting results. Most of the samples were not hair at all, some were human, some were from horses, some from known bear types but two samples showed a surprising match: a 100% match to 40,000 year old DNA from a polar bear. One sample came from the carcass of an animal killed 40 years ago in India and the other from Bhutan. The scientists report that: “It seems more likely that the two hairs reported here are from either a previously unrecognised bear species, or brown bear/polar bear hybrids.”"
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UK Government pays Microsoft £5.5M for extended support of Windows XP.

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 10 months ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "The UK Government has signed a contract worth £5.5M (almost $9M) for extended support and security updates for Windows XP for 12 months after April 8. The deal covers XP, Exchange 2003 and Office 2003 for users in central and local government, schools and the National Health Service. The NHS is in need of this deal because it was estimated last September that 85% of the NHS's 800,000 computers were running XP."
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NSA intercepts shipments of new computers and installs software.

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about a year ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "According to an orginal report in Der Spiegel, and
secondary reporting in the Washington Post, the NSA intercepts deliveries of PCs and installs logging software or hardware on them before the customer receives them. According to a document cited by Der Spegel, interception is one of the NSA's "most productive operations"

Der Spiegel also reported that the NSA intercepts and uses Windows crash reports in order to gather information that is used to develop new methods to crack Windows machines."

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Microsoft pulls update for Surface 2 after problems.

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about a year ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "On Decemer 10, Microsoft released a firmware update for Surface Pro 2. Now, due to widespread issues with battery life, charging, sleeping, etc., Microsoft has pulled the update. It appears that some of the tablets failed to completely install the update. The number of people posting about the the problem in the Microsoft Community site shows that there are at least hundreds of users with this problem. What propeortion of the Surface Pro 2 user base does this represent?"
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Why you should not talk to the cops, redux.

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about a year ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "The technique most commonly used by police in the USA for interrogations produces a shockingly high rate of false confessions. People who have solid alibis tend to be found guilty purely because of their confession. This technique was developed by John Reid and the defendant who confessed in the case that made Reid's reputation was shown, years later, to be innocent. The technique discussed in an article in the New Yorker magazine (subscription required). The author of the article also discuses it in an interview on NPR's Fresh Air program. The underpinnings of the Reid technique have been shown to be based on pseudo-science. The UK police now use a different technique, which is not focussed on obtaining a confession, but rather eliciting information which may be used to show the guilt or innocence of the interviewee: the PEACE technique, which is closer to the way journalists conduct interviews. Good cop/bad cop doesn't seem to feature in any techniques."
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Nearly 150 years late, the Church of England apologises to Charles Darwin

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about a year ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "Almost 150 years ago, the Church of England rejected Charles Darwin's theories. Now, 150 years later, the church is comparing that rejection to the rejection of Galileo's work. The CoE will publish an apology, written by the Rev Dr Malcolm Brown, the Church's director of mission and public affairs. The apology will be on a CoE website, going live on Monday, which will promote Charles Darwin's ideas."
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Team Oracle penalized for rules violations

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about a year ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "On Saturday, Oracle Team USA and Team New Zealand begin racing for the America's Cup in the amazing AC72 boats. However, the Oracle team starts with a siginficant handicap. It was recently discovered that members of Oracle Team USA made illegal changes to the boats used in the Americas Cup Series (which is sailed in the smaller AC45 boats). After a hearing on Friday, the International Jury has decided on the penalty: Team Oracle will have to pay a fine, sail without some team members and more significantly, loses 2 points before starting the Americas Cup races against Team New Zealand. A tiny amount of weight had been added to the kingposts, in violation of the measurement rules for the class. This was reported to the measurement committee some weeks ago after its discovery by boatbuilders working for America's Cup Regatta Management (ACRM), not members of Oracle Team USA."
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The NSA can't search its own emails.

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "The NSA responded to an FOI request asking that the requestor narrow the information required because its email system is "a little antiquated and archaic". This followed a request for information on emails between the NSA and the National Geographic channel, following the latter broadcasting a documentary that was very friendly to the NSA. The intent was to investigate the NSA's PR efforts. Apparently the NSA can only search individual employees' mailboxes and cannot search all emails across the agency."
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No porn from public WiFi hotspots in the UK

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 2 years ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "The Prime Minister of the UK is proposing that porn should not be available through WiFi hotspots in public areas. Exactly how this will be implemented has not been identified, even to the extent of whether the ISP or the hotspot operator should implement the blocking. The Children’s Charities Coalition has demanded urgent action on the issue."
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Explaining the persistence of Microsoft in the Enterprise

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  about 2 years ago

whoever57 (658626) writes "Galen Gruman writes in InfoWorld about the persistence of Microsoft technologies in the enterprise. He notices that IT groups are the most likely buyers fro Windows tablets, despite their users preference for Android and IOS tablets. He blames this on "in-breeding" within IT groups — who simply expect Microsoft technologies "to extend into the newfangled technologies such as mobile and cloud". IT groups, he writes, will wait for Microsft to deliver the technologies that are already available from other sources. He summarizes the status of Microsoft's offerings thus:
"It's clear Microsoft's strategy is to withhold its better technologies to force users to stick with the inferior Windows platforms. IT is waiting for that magic day when Microsoft's Windows delivers beyond the legacy desktop.
Users, meanwhile, have moved on. They'll buy more tablets than PCs this year, and adoption will only accelerate as users start augmenting their PCs at work with tablets, not just buy them for home use as is usually the case today"
"

Link to Original Source

Journals

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I finally did it: +5 funny with a one-word post!

whoever57 whoever57 writes  |  more than 10 years ago I finally did it, a one-word post was modded up to +5 funny! OK, so the title was 2 words, but there was only one word in the text -- read it here. If you don't think it is funny, then read the article text.

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