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My cumulative GPA, thus far:

whoisisis Danish GPA (441 comments)

My GPA is way more than 4. It probably has something to do with the fact that in Denmark, the scale goes from -3 to 12.

about a year and a half ago
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Electrical Grid Hum Used To Time Locate Any Digital Recording

whoisisis This could get messy (168 comments)

So now what the bad guys have to to after tampering with audio recordings is to subtract the hum of the mains and add the hum at a different time. ?

about a year and a half ago
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Gamma-Ray Photon Observations Indicate Space-Time Is Smooth

whoisisis Re:Space/time duration/distance (81 comments)

Seven billion light years away (seven billion years ago)

I may not have this right, but due to the expansion of space, wouldn't it have been closer than seven billion light years away at the time of the kaboom? And if the light's taken seven billion light years to get here, space will have expanded further, so the remnants would now be further than seven billion light years away. Right?

Or is this the sort of thing where you can be specific about the distance, or the time, but not both?

Wikipedia has an answer, but I think the above is just meant to give the layman some rough understanding of what's going on.

Beware that it is extremely difficult to measure these kinds of distances exactly. The figure may be a few orders of magnitude wrong, so whether you take into account the expanding universe or not may not be that important...
Cosmologists measure everything in gigaparsec. 7b light years is only 0.3 GPc so it may not be that important.

about 2 years ago
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% of my digital storage that is solid-state:

whoisisis Re:100% solid state. (280 comments)

Because i don't know any storage media that's in liquid or gaseous form, or a plasma.

I, for one, store all my digital stuff in the Bose-Einstein condensate phase of matter on my shiny new quantum computer

more than 2 years ago
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Nmap 6 Released Featuring Improved Scripting, Full IPv6 Support

whoisisis Re:Better Details (45 comments)

I find it a bit amusing that their IPv6 address starts with 2600

more than 2 years ago
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Stealing Smartphone Crypto Keys Using Radio Waves

whoisisis TEMPEST (37 comments)

Looks like they need some TEMPEST shielding.

about 2 years ago
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IBM Shrinks Bit Size To 12 Atoms

whoisisis Re:256 qbit per atom? (135 comments)

See also Phys. Rev. A 78, 012336 (2008) http://pra.aps.org/abstract/PRA/v78/i1/e012336. With Holmium they get 60 qbits per atom from these "pooled states".

The articles are slightly old. K. Mølmer said during a lecture some time ago that they have found an atom suitable for 128 or 256 qbits with this method.

more than 2 years ago
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IBM Shrinks Bit Size To 12 Atoms

whoisisis Re:256 qbit per atom? (135 comments)

Not exactly. They have quite some clever ways to handle these Rydberg states in neutral atoms. They use hyperfine splitting to get a large amount of qbits in single atoms.

See Rev. Mod. Phys. 82, 2313–2363 (2010) (http://rmp.aps.org/abstract/RMP/v82/i3/p2313_1)

more than 2 years ago
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IBM Shrinks Bit Size To 12 Atoms

whoisisis Re:1/12 bit per atom? Not impressed. (135 comments)

I think they used one or a few electrons in iron or nickle. An electron can be in any number of excited states.

more than 2 years ago
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IBM Shrinks Bit Size To 12 Atoms

whoisisis 1/12 bit per atom? Not impressed. (135 comments)

I've seen researchers at our university create 256 qbits in a single atom. Of course, qbits are not directly usable in conventional computing...

more than 2 years ago
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North Korean Dictator Kim Jong Il Dead at 70

whoisisis News for nerds (518 comments)

How does this qualify as "News for nerds, stuff that matters"?

more than 2 years ago
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Smallest Known Black Hole Found

whoisisis Re:interesting, but vaguely in line with estimates (69 comments)

I am a physicist, although not an astronomer. Indeed, microscopic black holes (less than the earth mass) are speculated to exist. They're called primordial black holes and must be created in the early universe.

They're candidates for the sources of gamma ray bursts.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is Your Data Safe In the Cloud?

whoisisis Encrypt your data (332 comments)

Well, I trust both Google and Dropbox enough to store my encrypted backups. Wouldn't upload anything important without encryption though.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Flash-Friendly Router To Replace Aging WRT54GS?

whoisisis tp-link wr1043 (334 comments)

I run OpenWRT Backfire on my TP-link WR1043. It even comes with an USB port.
It's MIPS based, comes with 32 MB ram and a gigabit switch etc.

Can only recommend.

more than 2 years ago
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Physicist Uses Laser Light As Fast, True-Random Number Generator

whoisisis Re:"Truly random numbers" (326 comments)

Well, something has to explain what we observe in the lab.
So far, quantum physics is the only successful theory.

more than 2 years ago
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The Myth of Renewable Energy

whoisisis I don't really see the problems in wind/solar powe (835 comments)

In wind power, yes, you use rare earth materials. But at end of life, these can be recycled. It's not like we throw
the rare earth materials into space when we're done with them.

Solar power uses ground water in deserts. Does this even run out? I mean, ground water is there because it rains or comes in from the sea.
Evaporating water from solar panels still make it into rain and so the cycle should continue.

What's the fuss?

more than 2 years ago
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MIT Creates Chip to Model Synapses

whoisisis Re:Plasticity (220 comments)

or rather how it does so

more than 2 years ago
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MIT Creates Chip to Model Synapses

whoisisis Plasticity (220 comments)

I wonder if this chip can do plasticity and learning just as a real brain.

One thing is to hardwire a neural network, another is to mimic the brain.
The brain constantly rewires itself in different ways to learn.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Unity/Gnome 3/Win8/iOS — Do We Really Hate All New GUIs?

whoisisis Re:I actually value speed (1040 comments)

I'm 23 too, and I use Fluxbox for the exact same reasons.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Unity/Gnome 3/Win8/iOS — Do We Really Hate All New GUIs?

whoisisis What is this unity of which you speak? (1040 comments)

When I started using Linux, I used WindowMaker as my window manager. It was a bit bloated, but it was fast and efficient.
I soon switched to Fluxbox, since it is much nicer and easier to customize and it does not get in your way.

With Fluxbox, there is nothing (no icons, and no annoying screen-estate eaters or blinking distractions) but a single menu always /just one mouse click away/
with your most used applications in it. You don't even have to move your mouse and hit (or miss) an icon first.
Desktop switching couldn't be faster, just press alt+fx or scroll with your mouse.
No annoying or time consuming animations to distract or delay you.

I love Fluxbox!

more than 2 years ago

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