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Humans Hardwired to Believe in Supernatural Deity?

winterlens Re:Or maybe there is some truth in the belief? (1852 comments)

Then help me out by maybe providing what your definition would be?

As I stated in my original post, Christianity traditionally has defined "free will" to mean the ability to do what is right. Denominations deal with determinism in various ways, but Orthodox Christianity generally agrees that one's nature determines one's will. In this sense we find a bounded will in Christianity in the way I think you'd like to find with chaos theory.

The OP opts for a definition that is "the power of contrary choice," i.e., the ability to not choose something. His logical problem was that he used a definition outside of the system he was critiquing to show the system was inconsistent.

As far as I can tell, you agree with me that his definition is wrong, since you don't apparently believe Joe Freewill has the power of contrary choice, either.

Let's reformulate that a bit: "Even if you knew the state of the universe to infinite detail at time 'X-eps', you could not predict with 100% accuracy what Joe Freewill will do at time X."

Neither can Joe.

Except that part about "God's foreknowledge" coexisting with "free will" being a "mystery". (Sorry, couldn't resist.)

(Does that mean that you don't have the power of contrary choice in this instance?)

You've got the same problem here as the OP: you're not using the Christian definition of free will to prove the system is inconsistent. Orthodox Christianity never taught that man had free will in the way that you speak of here. They taught quite early that man was determined by his nature and was free to do whatever his nature permitted. They never said that man wasn't free in heaven--just that he couldn't sin.

more than 7 years ago

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