Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Gabe Newell Responds: Yes, We're Looking For Cheaters Via DNS

wjousts Whoosh (511 comments)

No need to check your DNS history to tell you haven't visited OhNowIGetTheJoke.net

about 5 months ago
top

Huge Explosion at Texas Fertilizer Plant

wjousts Re:How Tragic (422 comments)

Don't they have a right to an opinion.

Everybody has a right to their own opinion. What they don't have is a right to their own facts.

about a year ago
top

Swedish Engineer's RC Plane Gets a Balloon Lift To Space

wjousts Re:Old school (90 comments)

It's a figure of speech. But please, don't stop being a pedantic asshole.

about a year ago
top

The Man Who Sold Shares of Himself

wjousts Re:Slavery? (215 comments)

Well, I guess it voluntary.

about a year ago
top

The Data That Drove Yahoo's Telecommuting Ban

wjousts Re:VPN not a requirement for doing useful work (529 comments)

I'm not saying don't use VPN. I'm saying you don't need the VPN all the time. If you've got all the material you need to write a report in Word, then you don't need to be on VPN the entire time you are typing.

about a year ago
top

The Data That Drove Yahoo's Telecommuting Ban

wjousts VPN not a requirement for doing useful work (529 comments)

Sure you need to be on the VPN to see your e-mail (that notorious destroyer of productivity), but there's a lot of stuff you can be doing offline (or at least off the VPN) that is still productive work. For example, if I'm writing code, it's not always the case that I have to be on the company network to do it.

Also, my VPN software seems to be the only common element in the rare blue-screen crashes I get on my work laptop - so it's usually a lot less frustrating to leave it off.

In fact, if I am goofing off, I'm much more likely to log into the VPN and open my e-mail so that others can see that I'm "online" and working. I like to sit my laptop next to my gaming desktop while I do this!

about a year ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Dealing With an Advanced Wi-Fi Leech?

wjousts Re:Mac Whitelist (884 comments)

Yeah, sure is a pain when you add new device, especially since it's completely ineffective at keeping anybody out.

about a year and a half ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Making Side-Money As a Programmer?

wjousts Re:Not necessarily (257 comments)

And if you want to do iOS apps, you need a Mac to even get started.

about a year and a half ago
top

The Book of GIMP

wjousts Re:My experience with the GIMP (197 comments)

Again...it depends on how much you value your time. Doing something "easy" saves time, whether or not the time saved over the lifetime of the product adds up to $200 - $600 depends on your situation.

about a year and a half ago
top

DNA Confirms Parking Lot Remains Belong To King Richard III

wjousts Re:Why? (212 comments)

According to one report I read, he had a particularly rare mutation in his mitochondrial DNA. So no, there aren't too many people who share it.

about a year and a half ago
top

DNA Confirms Parking Lot Remains Belong To King Richard III

wjousts Re:Why? (212 comments)

Really, the natives were the real villains here. They had no concept of how anybody could "own" land and yet the happily took 60 guilders of some poor Dutch traders anyway.

about a year and a half ago
top

DNA Confirms Parking Lot Remains Belong To King Richard III

wjousts Re:Reburial Where? (212 comments)

They didn't have Google Maps then.

Also, it seems unlikely that the current or future government of England will actively try and erase him from history again.

about a year and a half ago
top

DNA Confirms Parking Lot Remains Belong To King Richard III

wjousts Re:Still no explanation (212 comments)

He wasn't. He was buried at a chapel. A chapel that was later knocked down and replaced with a house. A house that was later bought by the council, knocked down and replaced with a car park.

about a year and a half ago
top

DNA Confirms Parking Lot Remains Belong To King Richard III

wjousts Re:Reburial Where? (212 comments)

Leicester Cathedral. Which I'm assuming they are not likely to lose track of.

about a year and a half ago
top

DNA Confirms Parking Lot Remains Belong To King Richard III

wjousts Re:Oh dear... (212 comments)

Somebody clearly hasn't seen Black Adder.

about a year and a half ago
top

Form1 3D Printer and Kickstarter Get Sued For Patent Infringment

wjousts Re:Publicizing patents (211 comments)

Can anyone think of a downside?

One...

there's also the fact that hiring the advertising media is far cheaper than hiring patent lawyers.

And that's it. Remember a lot of politicians are/were lawyers. But seriously, the only downside is that it might encourage companies to keep things as trade secret so that they don't have to publicize it.

about a year and a half ago
top

Form1 3D Printer and Kickstarter Get Sued For Patent Infringment

wjousts Re:Don't innovate, litigate! (211 comments)

It is the patent holders responsibility to defend their patent.

And that would appear to be what they are doing. Also, patents aren't trademarks. You don't lose them if you don't sue.

about a year and a half ago

Submissions

top

How to boost Computer Science Education

wjousts wjousts writes  |  about 5 months ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "NPR had a story on how a number of nonprofit and for-profit groups are trying to deal with what they see as a crisis in computer science education in K-12 US public schools.

Quoting:

"Ninety percent of schools just don't even teach [computer science]. So if you're a parent and your school doesn't even offer this class, your kids aren't going to have the preparation they need for 21st century," says Hadi Partovi, co-founder of the nonprofit Code.org. "Just like we teach how electricity works and biology basics they should also know how the Internet works and how apps work. Schools need to add this to the curriculum."

Some sobering stats from last year's Computer Science AP [Advanced Placement] data:

* In Mississippi, Montana and Wyoming, no girls took the computer science exam.
* In 11 states, no black students took it.
* In eight states, no Hispanics took it.
* In 17 states, fewer than 100 students took it."

Link to Original Source
top

The Facebook Fallacy - Technology Review

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 2 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "In a provocative piece on MIT's Technology Review, Michael Wolff argues that not only will Facebook fail, it may well take the rest of the ad supported web with it.

Facebook is a company of technologists, not marketers. If you wanted to bet on someone succeeding in the marketing business, you'd bet on technologists only if they could invent some new way to sell; you wouldn't bet on them to sell the way marketers have always sold.

As Facebook gluts an already glutted market, the fallacy of the Web as a profitable ad medium can no longer be overlooked. The crash will come. And Facebook—that putative transformer of worlds, which is, in reality, only an ad-driven site—will fall with everybody else.

"

Link to Original Source
top

Game Giant Forced To Play Catch Up : NPR

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 2 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "Electronics Arts built a gaming empire with a strategy straight out of Hollywood — big names and big budgets. But the market has changed to favor data-driven online games, and the Redwood City, Calif., company finds itself forced to change too."
Link to Original Source
top

Rage Against the Smart Meter - Technology Review

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 2 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "As utilities are rolling out smart meters, electric meters that use wireless radios to transmit data on electricity usage back to the utility, some in Maine are objecting.

Technology Review reports:

Friedman, who carries a radio-frequency analyzer that emits frightening crackles around cell phones and Wi-Fi routers, says smart meters are a dangerous idea. They are an invasion of privacy and might even cause illness, he has alleged in a legal complaint set to be heard by the Maine Supreme Court next month.

"

Link to Original Source
top

Wasting Hackers' Time to Keep Websites Safe

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 2 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "A new security start-up, Mykonos Software, is pushing a new approach to handling hackers. Instead of blocking them, it proposes instead to waste their time by feeding them false information until they give up.

As reported in Technology Review:

As a promotional tool to impress potential clients, Mykonos engineers have built versions of the company's software that taunt attackers. One directs a hacker to a Google Maps search for nearby criminal attorneys. Another parodies Microsoft's now-defunct anthropomorphic paper clip, Clippy, with the message: "It looks like you're an unsophisticated script kiddie. Do you need help writing code?"

Their tactics include placing supercookies on suspected attackers computers.

There are few things hackers hate more than being taunted. So is this a valid strategy? Or is it waiving a red cloak at a bull?"

Link to Original Source

top

College Campus Network Still Infected by a Compute

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 2 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "From IEEE Spectrum, computers at the City College of San Francisco (CCSF) may still be infected with several viruses, the oldest from 1999!

As of Friday, the viruses were still active. The Chronicle says that CCSF administrators are telling students and employees to "change computer passwords, avoid using school computers for banking or purchases, and to check home computers for viruses" since the viruses have, the college's Chief Technology Officer warned, infected servers and desktops "across administrative, instructional and wireless networks."

"

Link to Original Source
top

Why should we stop online piracy? - opinion - 19 J

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 2 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "From New Scientist: A little copyright infringement is good for the economy and society, says Matthew Yglesia

Online piracy is like fouling in basketball. You want to penalise it to prevent it from getting out of control, but any effort to actually eliminate it would be a cure much worse than the disease.

"

Link to Original Source
top

Why Microsoft Embraced Gaming

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 2 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "A interesting take on the birth of the Xbox from Technology Review:

When the original Xbox video-game console went on sale in 2001, it wasn't clear why Microsoft, known for staid workplace software, was branching out into fast-paced action games. But Microsoft decided that capitalizing on the popularity of gaming could help the company position itself for the coming wave of home digital entertainment.

"

Link to Original Source
top

How IT Costs More Jobs than It Creates - Technolog

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 2 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the Center for Digital Business at MIT's Sloan School of Management, and Andrew McAfee, a principal research scientist at the center argue in their new book "Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution Is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy". That advances in IT have cost more jobs than it has created and has enabled CEOs and other leaders to earn outsized incomes.

Is there some truth to it? Or is it Ludditism?"

Link to Original Source
top

How Negative Reviews Increase Sales Online - Techn

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 2 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "

Panos Iperitos set out to study the dollar value of online reputation, and along the way he discovered the counter-intuitive ways that reviews inform it

Not surprisingly, people are willing to pay a premium (up to 5%) to buy a product for a seller with a good reputation, but interestingly, negative product reviews can lead to higher sales:

One reason is that buyers gain confidence that "if this is the worst this product will throw at me, it must be pretty good." "Negative reviews that are specific actually tend to serve as risk mitigators," says Ipeirotis On the other hand, the phrase "good packaging" makes it sound like there was nothing else in the transaction worth complimenting.

Spelling and grammar in reviews also have an impact. So much so that unconfirmed rumors have suggested that shoe seller Zappos has spent $0.10 per review to have Amazon's Mechanical Turk correct spelling and grammar in Zappos reviews."
Link to Original Source

top

The Autism Advantage

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 3 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "As reported on sciencedaily.com:

Though people with autism face many challenges because of their condition, they may have been capable hunter-gatherers in prehistoric times, according to a paper published in the journal Evolutionary Psychology in May.

The "autism advantage," a relatively new perspective, contends that sometimes autism has compensating benefits, including increased abilities for spatial intelligence, concentration and memory. Although individuals with autism have trouble with social cognition, their other cognitive abilities are sometimes largely intact.

So is autism a "disorder" or a normal part of human evolutionary history?"
Link to Original Source

top

The Freedom Box Alternative to Facebook

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 3 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "

“The human race has a susceptibility to harm, but Mr. Zuckerberg has attained an unenviable record. He has done more harm to the human race than anybody else his age. Because he harnessed ‘Friday Night,’ that is, ‘Everybody needs to get laid,’ and he turned it into a structure for degenerating the integrity of human personality. And he has to a remarkable extent succeeded with a very poor deal, namely ‘I will give you free Web hosting and some PHP doodads and you get spying for free all the time.’ ”

These are the provocative words of Columbia University law professor Eben Moglen and begins IEEE Spectrum's interview with the Software Freedom Law Center's James Vasile, one of the minds (along with Moglen) behind the idea of the Freedom Box."
Link to Original Source

top

How Companies Are Using Data from Foursquare - Tec

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 3 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "Technology Review reports on how businesses are using data from all those Foursquare check-ins:

Foursquare now provides its merchant platform to more than 300,000 businesses, which can track their customers through a newly launched analytics dashboard. Merchants can analyze various metrics over time, including how many check-ins are recorded each day, who the most recent and most frequent visitors are, how visitors who check in break down by gender, and what time of day the most people check in; businesses with multiple locations can aggregate statistics to fit their needs. Foursquare provides the same platform "for Joe's coffee shop and Starbucks," says Eric Friedman, Foursquare's director of business development, but companies use the tools and data in different ways, depending on their specific objectives. "Some people are using it directly to measure [differences between] top-performing stores and low-performing stores," Friedman says. Others might track geographic differences.

"

Link to Original Source
top

Who Owns Your Social Identity?

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 3 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "Who actually owns your username on a website? What rights do you have to use it? What happens if they decide to take it away? IEEE Spectrum reports:

What happens if Facebook or Twitter or, say, your blog hosting service, makes you take a different user name? Sound impossible? It’s happened. Last week, a software researcher named Danah Boyd woke up to find her entire blog had disappeared, and in fact, had been renamed, because her hosting service had given her blog’s name to someone else.

And as important as they are, what protects our accounts are the terms of service agreements. If you read them—and who does?—you’d learn, probably to no surprise, that they protect the provider a lot more then they protect you.

"

Link to Original Source
top

How People Broadcast Their Locations Without Meani

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 3 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "Smart phones include geotagging features that many people aren't aware of MIT Technology Review reports. And it's not just in the obvious places:

For example, by looking at the location metadata stored with pictures posted through one man's anonymous Twitter account, the researchers were able to pinpoint his likely home address. From there, by cross-referencing this location with city records, they found his name. Using that information, the researchers went on to find his place of work, his wife's name, and information about his children.

"

Link to Original Source
top

A Robot That Can Punch You in the Face

wjousts wjousts writes  |  more than 3 years ago

wjousts (1529427) writes "IEEE Spectrum is reporting on the fighting robot that Australian structural engineer named Kris Tressider has built. Powered by windshield wiper motors it randomly throws both jabs and hooks at different speeds and from slightly different directions. It even features a "berserk" mode. What could possibly go wrong?

Kris hopes to turn Punching Pro into an actual product with a target price under $1,000.

See the link for a video of the robot getting a good thrashing."

Link to Original Source

Journals

wjousts has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...