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Makerbot Desktop 3D Scanner Goes On Sale

wjsteele $1400 + $150 for warranty. (89 comments)

Seems kind of expensive to me for a rotating plate, two LED lasers and a camera.

Bill

about a year ago
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Flying Car Crashes In British Columbia

wjsteele Re: Got more air time than Moller SkyCar (91 comments)

You should check into ultra light aircraft... There is no requirements for licensing, registration or airworthyness. A lot of the modern design new ultralight aircraft don't even look like ultralights of the past... They're made with carbon fibre and are fully enclosed. I saw one this year down at Sun-n-fun that was an electric motor glider and could fly for two hours under power... But could sail as long as your bladder could hold out... Which is about the same capability as any other plane. Times are changing for the better in the national airspace. Bill

about a year ago
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CES: Formlabs Co-Founder Describes Their Stereolithographic 3D Printer (Video)

wjsteele .3mm must be wrong. (59 comments)

The article mentions resolution down to .3mm... I'm sure he is incorrect here... the Form1 must be able to go much higher. Standard FDM printers like the Makerbot Replicator can easily do .1mm or even less. RepRaps get down below .02mm regularly.

Bill

about a year and a half ago
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Excessive Modularity Hindered Development of the 787

wjsteele Re:No specs? (200 comments)

I'm not sure where you got that information, but the only problem with the fasteners on the 787 had nothing to do with where they got them... as they are custom designed for this application. It had everything to do with the way they were installed. The problem was that the fasteners were not installed per the specification which caused them to have less holding power than the specifications said.

Those fasteners were designed to hold the composite components to the titanium sub structure, and even in their weakened state were still more than the 1.5x strength factor required. And they NEVER bought them from the hardware store... no hardware store on earth would stock that specific component.

Bill

about a year and a half ago
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The 3D Un-Printer

wjsteele Re:Nylon? (91 comments)

The temperature at which nylon melts is significantly less than the temperature of ignition, which is where the toxic gasses occur. Many people have been using nylon in their 3d printers with no issue... In fact, it turns out to be a great filament to use in them and makes very nice products.

Bill

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Data Storage Highway Robbery?

wjsteele Linked article? (168 comments)

Am I missing something? I don't see a linked article or documentation anywhere in the post that states these prices.

about 2 years ago
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DIY Laser Cutter Raises Capital, Concerns

wjsteele Re:Obvious Solution (184 comments)

The bigger issues with this may be that it causes the laser to bounce back into the lens which asfaik can cause damage to the lens.

Why would a bouncing infrared laser hurt the lens that the laser beam just passed through??? The other end of the laser tube is another IR mirror. There is no ill effect of having the beam bounce back directly down the path.

Bill

about 2 years ago
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DIY Laser Cutter Raises Capital, Concerns

wjsteele Re:Obvious Solution (184 comments)

Dont even do that. Paint it white.

White paint would have no effect unless of course it was "titanium white" in which the titanium would be a relfector. The rest of it would simply vaporize away. This isn't a little laser pointer we're talking about... it's a 40 watt CO2 laser... that has a wavelength of 10600 nm. That's a far longer wavelength than the ~800 you can see in the near infrared and will be absorbed in quite a few materials you think are good optical reflectors. Using a rough metal shield would be the best thing to have. (Smooth metal shields tend to be infrared mirrors... which wouldn't exactly help the issue.)

Bill

about 2 years ago
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Does Crowdfunding Work?

wjsteele In short, yes, it does work. (70 comments)

If the project is well thought out and the pitch is done reasonably well so that the the funder knows what they are getting into, then yes, it does work.

As a kickstarter myself (shameless plug: Ultra-Bot) I started out with a modest goal... and quickly achieved it with a product that I think was well thought out, had reasonably low expectations and offered the intended audience exactly what they wanted.

With that said, however, there are a few kickstarters that are way off the mark and haven't thought it out that well... usually because they have their emotions tied into the product and it really isn't as good as they think it is... which in that case, Kickstarter actually works as well... it allows you to know that your idea isn't so hot before you invest a billion bucks in it.

Bill

about 2 years ago
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Does Crowdfunding Work?

wjsteele Re:No. This is how it goes... (70 comments)

And then said "Famous douchebag" posts your message as an A/C on Slashdot.

Man, I just wish I had mod points.

Bill

about 2 years ago
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Cubify 3D Printers Aren't Just for Squares (Video)

wjsteele Re:Who is this for? (134 comments)

It's most certaintly not the first. There are several 3D printer manufacturers (including MakerBot themselves) out there that have been doing this for quite a while now... but none of them are charging as much for their consumables. It seems that for $50, you get about a pound of material, which is roughly 3 times the normal cost.

Bill

about 2 years ago
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EU Court Upholds Microsoft Antitrust Fines

wjsteele Re:EU bailout (126 comments)

The largest antitrust fine to date [nabarro.com]: €992M, on a cartel of lift makers within the EU.

Bullshit. The largest antitrust fine to date: €1.06B, was on Intel, for abusing its dominance in the computer chip market.

more than 2 years ago
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Plastic Logic Shows Off a Color ePaper Screen

wjsteele Re:Fragility (50 comments)

Perhaps you missed the linked videos... but they actually show how flexible the display is as well as how tolerable it is to cutting it in half!

Bill

more than 2 years ago
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Fly-By-Wire Contributed To Air France 447 Disaster

wjsteele Re:Fly by wire.... (319 comments)

in such occasions, the usual procedure is not to lower the nose & convert altitude to speed, but to simply 'power yourself out' of the stall situation - apply a lot of (available excess) power, and your speed will pick up, and you're not close to stalling anymore.

I'm not sure where you got that information, but that is not the correct course of action. Even in a low altitude situation, a stall can only be recovered by lowering the angle of attack... engine power and speed have absolutely nothing to do with it. A stall is an aerodynamic condition where the wings are not producing enough lift for flight. Pushing the nose over (to lower the angle of attack) allows the air to reattach to the wings which eliminates the stall condition.

Bill

more than 2 years ago
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Fly-By-Wire Contributed To Air France 447 Disaster

wjsteele Re:Fly by wire.... (319 comments)

There is one reason and one reason alone Airbus didn't link the sticks - and that's cost (both in higher building costs and extra weight).

>

The Airbus, like Boeings, have "Stick Shakers" to give feedback to the pilot. The stall waring indicator, in fact, does trigger the stick shaker, but once you get below a certain speed (like these pilots did) the aircraft thinks the plane is too slow to be flying so it must be taxing, so it turns it off.

Bill

more than 2 years ago
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SpaceX Launch To International Space Station Delayed For Code Tweaks

wjsteele Re:Delayed because of code change or because .... (97 comments)

Really? I'm pretty sure Falcon 1 has successfully launced several payloads to orbit... which pretty much blows your assertations out of orbit. Also, the Falcon 9 has had launched twice, both successfully orbiting the Dragon capsule (though the first was just a shell with no avionics) it still was a successful mission. They did have failures (first 3 F1s for example) but that's not a 90% failure rate by any stretch.

Bill

more than 2 years ago
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SpaceX Launch To International Space Station Delayed For Code Tweaks

wjsteele Re:On a rocket? (97 comments)

Actually, only a few companies working on non-orbital vehicles are designing aircraft with wings... since they spend a lot of their time in the air... in space, you don't need wings. It's much more efficient to design a vehicle without them if all you're doing is shooting it up on a rocket and landing it under a parachute (after reentry, which also causes problems for wings.)

Bill

more than 2 years ago
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SpaceX Launch To International Space Station Delayed For Code Tweaks

wjsteele Tests, not tweaks! (97 comments)

No where in Elon's Tweet or in the referenced article does it say they need to tweak the code... it says they need more time to "test" it.

Bill

more than 2 years ago
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Did Microsoft Simply Run Out of Time On Windows RT?

wjsteele But the iPad can't either! (305 comments)

The fact that the Win RT based devices can't join a domain doesn't matter. In fact, the iPad has never been able to join one and it doesn't seem to be a problem with them. Corporate infrastructures are adapting to support the comsumer based devices being brought in by employees... it's just a simple fact. Corporations save a lot of money when they don't have to buy their employees devices, so the trade offs are worth it.

Bill

more than 2 years ago
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Space Junk Forced Astronauts Into ISS Escape Capsules

wjsteele Re:Soyuz capsules... (87 comments)

Exactly... what's to test... they're used to board and leave the space station every single time! The Russians have been using these for decades. One of their early modules failed, but that was in the early 70's... since then they've been very reliable with only minor issues.

more than 2 years ago

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