Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

yeshuawatso Re:Lies and statistics... (500 comments)

True, but that's not how insurance works (but you know this already). The insurer took the risk of insuring you in hopes you wouldn't use the plan at all (even the physicals), so it's their loss (and your win) their prediction models didn't include the probability that you'd be bitten by a rabid bat (if so, then damn their thorough). The game wouldn't be too fair if the insurer took your premium knowing you weren't going to file any claims as you'd be better off just keeping the money. Not to say they haven't tried this, that's the whole argument about "pre-existing conditions" being uninsurable but the insurance company keeping your money because you haven't filed a legitimate claim that would cover a "new" condition. This is the area socialized medicine does work since "pre-existing condition" doesn't really matter anymore. Your rabid bite is an outlier 5 standard deviations from the mean.

10 hours ago
top

35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

yeshuawatso Re:Lies and statistics... (500 comments)

Actually, not true. Your annual premium (at least part of it) is re-invested into other securities to make a return. Considering a 6% ROI, they're close to breaking even. Considering that your premiums are grouped with others to invest, they're probably still making a profit since others on the plan that pay the $6k/yr probably didn't have any claims filed.

12 hours ago
top

Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

yeshuawatso Re: Hmmm ... (311 comments)

That's not my point. My point is you can sue anyone but that doesn't mean your case is valid. For instance, if I filed suit against the manufacture of a firearm for negligence since someone used their weapon to kill my spouse, the case would be dismissed citing the very law you linked if I don't prove that the weapons company did anything illegal at the motion to dismiss review. I could also be punished for wasting the court's and defendant's time by paying legal fees.

In other words : whoosh!

about three weeks ago
top

Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

yeshuawatso Re:Hmmm ... (311 comments)

Can you sue automakers for car crashes not caused by defect?

Yes.

Can you sue gun makers for deaths?

Yes.

Can you sue the financial industry for losses in the market?

Again, Yes.

Then why the hell is this any different?

It's not. Nothing is stopping you from suing anyone for anything, you just need to be prepared to pay for a lot of legal fees as your cases get dismissed left and right. This is America and we can sue anyone we damn well please for any frivolous reason. You just can't always win. The only requirement for a tort is a civil wrongdoing, intentional or unintentional, and you, plaintiff, have to achieve the preponderance of the evidence.

Hell, sue the f[u]cking NSA for not having told you about it and stopped it.

Give her time, she's working on including them for failing to the act against the National security that is her mediocre body (I assume, I haven't seen the pics).

about three weeks ago
top

Supreme Court Declines Case On Making Online Retailers Collect Sales Taxes

yeshuawatso Re:Finally a flat playing ground (293 comments)

Fort Smith (where I live) is 9.75% (was 9.25% until the recent tax increase at the State level). 9.375% (no 9.875%) is for "prepared" foods. Basically it's a tax on restaurants to pay for terrible tourism shortfalls and things like a convention center that no one really uses but still costs the city over a million dollars to maintain. Non-prepared foods are taxed much lower since the state only taxes it at 1.5% instead of the normal 6.5% for everything else.

about 8 months ago
top

Why Internet Explorer Still Dominates South Korea.

yeshuawatso WTF? (218 comments)

Even Microsoft is looking at SK and saying: "WTF? We don't even use ActiveX anymore."

about 9 months ago
top

A Little-Heralded New iOS 7 Feature: Multipath TCP

yeshuawatso Re:Siri: Bad use case? (172 comments)

If you use a proxy or VPN, then Pandora won't cut out (actually it just restarts the connection and moves to the next song). I've tested this numerous times with Pandora on Android with VPNs and proxy servers. Pandora only seems to complain if you change IPs suddenly (makes sense since you're changing networks).

As for the Siri use case, that's more applicable as you send the request to Siri down one pipe and receive it down the other. It doesn't support sending the same packets down both pipes simultaneously though since it still has to wait for the acknowledgement (or lack thereof) .

Often times, when I drive around the city, my phone will pick up a known wifi hotspot, negotiate an IP, then timeout when I drive too far away and my apps go ape shit crazy because the connection changed. My alternatives are to route all the traffic through a VPN (not the best since I only have 2.5G where I live and negotiation of the certificates takes forever), route the traffic for each hotspot through a proxy (an annoyance of Android for not having a system wide proxy), or turn off the wifi until I reach my destination. I tend to just turn it off since that's a one-click solution.

about 10 months ago
top

Apple Retailer Facing Class Action Suit Over Employee Bag Checks

yeshuawatso Re:Typical (353 comments)

Federal wage law states any break less than 20 minutes must be paid by the employer. Anything over that, you're riding your own dime. Funny thing, Federal laws don't require breaks at all. An employer could technically make you work an entire shift with no resting periods or to eat anything. However, doing so is a risk to the company since employee turnover will be through the roof, employee exhaustion will cause accidents, increasing workers comp claims, and OSHA violations are bound to pop-up everywhere. The State level is different since each state varies. Some states require rest periods after a certain number of hours worked. Some even require that lunches even be paid. Workers rights in the US are an abysmal failure, especially for hourly jobs. Your best bet is to find a salary job where breaks aren't that big of a concern and your quality and quantity of work are more important than how often you take a moment to breath.

1 year,13 hours
top

Dell Going Private In $24.4 Billion Agreement

yeshuawatso Nokia welcomes you, Dell! (217 comments)

Any deal with Microsoft in the title is destined for failure. Just ask Nokia how that's worked out for them so far.

about a year and a half ago
top

Researchers Explain Why Flu Comes In the Winter

yeshuawatso Re:something doesnt add up (129 comments)

It does add up if you read the article. The virus survives in humidity levels below 50% and above 98% since 98% simulates the human body. It doesn't fair as well at humidity levels between 60-80%.

about a year and a half ago
top

Budget 27" IPS Displays From Korea Are For Real

yeshuawatso Re:Buy local (266 comments)

...and four inches smaller... it's a completely different product.

That's what she said.

about 2 years ago
top

Yahoo CEO Wrongly Claimed To Have Degree In Computer Science

yeshuawatso Re:CEO's (363 comments)

As someone with an undergrad and post grad in business, I feel compelled to answer your confusion between worker pay and executive pay. For the worker, they're focused on their specific task, a tacical viewpoint of the business unit they are responsible. The worker answers for the actions of him/herself and not the actions of their fellow co-workers. When profits are down, investors don't ask the worker, they don't fire the worker, they look at the leadership team. It's not the worker who's neck is on the line if the company is unprofitable, and the worker will most certainly never face lawsuits from investors, the government, and other stakeholders.

The CEO on the other and is responsible for the actions of every worker that represents the company. They're responsible for the financial well being of the organization, the brand, and the relationship with every stakehokder. Like a game of chess, the CEO is responsible for the strategic direction of the business with not just today's direction but tomorrow's and the years ahead. In short, the worker is responsible for one thing, his/her work. The CEO is responsible for the work of everyone underneith him/her.

As far as compensation, most CEO's compensation come with base salaries and huge amounts of stock ownership to incentivise the CEO to return higher profits for the shareholders. So it would make since that CEOs receive a large stake of the profits.

more than 2 years ago
top

iFixit's Kyle Wiens On the War On DIY Electronics

yeshuawatso Re:"It's up to consumers to make a choice" (760 comments)

I'm not referring to the resell value, but the brand, which is a major part of public perception. Apple doesn't care about actual resell value, but they do care if their brand is diminished because the lack of their products holding value. If Apple's products diminished in value as rapidly as their PC and android/blackberry smartphone counterparts, then the brand is damaged and will become increasingly difficult to demand higher prices and "claim" to have higher quality. It's human nature to assume that if something loses its (economic) value rapidly, then it isn't worth much to begin with. I would love to claim I have the highest quality products; however, if my product loses half to nearly all its value in one year, then my customers are going to start questioning why I priced my product so high.

Not to go off topic too far, take a look at the housing market. People who are currently underwater are asking themselves if it is better to walk away from their homes or keep throwing money down the toilet, not knowing if the equity in their homes will ever come back. A home is a big portion of one's income, but so is a $500 tablet to someone with a $25,000 salary, and the bigger the portion of my income I lose for a product, the more I'm going to demand that the product not become worthless in less than a year. This is how Apple's brand can be tarnished unsuspectingly, because their price points on their tablets are reaching consumers that weren't once their target market, and could have a greater risk of bad mouthing the brand because they feel ripped off.

more than 2 years ago
top

iFixit's Kyle Wiens On the War On DIY Electronics

yeshuawatso Re:"It's up to consumers to make a choice" (760 comments)

While you're right on about the 1% of iPad owners tearing the device apart to repair, you might be missing another problem: resell ability. Apple products are notorious for retaining their resell value, but if it becomes too hard and too expensive to fix issues, then consumers are going to start demanding lower prices or Apple can watch its precious resell brand value evaporate. This typically doesn't matter for most of Apple's products except in their iPhone and iPad products. Clunking down $1500-3000 and having to pay a repair bill of $100 isn't that big of a deal to Apple's target market; however, for those that plopped $50-500 for their iPhones or iPads will find that $100 repair bill a little harder to swallow. A repair shouldn't costs 20% of the purchase price. If you bought a new Camry for $20,000 and you had to come up with $4,000 to repair it, you'd think twice about the purchase; the same idea works here but on a smaller scale.

more than 2 years ago
top

You Will Never Kill Piracy

yeshuawatso Been there, said that... (516 comments)

And nothing happens. While I commend the writer for articulating what is wrong with the current movie industry model, the reality is that Hollywood is hell bent on preserving their business model. For good reason too, most of Hollywood are distributors. The distributors are the ones that pay for the movie, the marketing, and shoving it down the throats of consumers. They're middle men protecting their business. Change the distribution model and you'll hear the sucking sound of Hollywood companies drying up. Studios aren't strapped with tons of cash to pay for hit movies on their own, so you'll have fewer movies being made. No one in Hollywood has any incentive to change the current model, and unlike the music industry that got dragged into the 21st century, or the game industry that has adapted to every new platform to survive, the movie industry consumers lack any desire to force a business model change or adaption. Tthe closest thing to adaption is Netflix and recent price hikes are an indicator that the distributors will kill it before giving the consumers what they want.

more than 2 years ago
top

Desura Linux Game Client Goes Open Source

yeshuawatso Re:I like it (94 comments)

Simple business decision. If the biggest cost of moving to a new platform is usability, then it would make sense to copy the competing platform to reduce the learning curve. Furthermore, hardcore gamers tend to go for the carbon, black, grey look more often than most. Personally, I've never understood why everything including the window shell has to be some form of black polished metal, but I don't use all of my free time gaming either.

more than 2 years ago
top

Netflix CEO Comments On Recent Decisions

yeshuawatso Re:Unfortunate (360 comments)

They loss 1/3 of their new subscription rate. I Should have clarified.

more than 2 years ago
top

Netflix CEO Comments On Recent Decisions

yeshuawatso Re:Google!!! (360 comments)

This feature is actually on Netflix for xbox360. I was surprised to find t here.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

top

Ask Slashdot: When is It Better to Modify the ERP vs. Interfacing It?

yeshuawatso yeshuawatso writes  |  4 hours ago

yeshuawatso (1774190) writes "I work for one of the largest HVAC manufacturers in the world. We've currently spent millions of dollars investing in an ERP system from Oracle (via a third-party implementor and distributor) that handles most of our global operations, but it's been a great ordeal getting the thing to work for us across SBUs and even departments without having to constantly go back to the third-party, whom have their hands out asking for more money. What we've also discovered is that the ERP system is being used for inputting and retrieving data but not for managing the data. Managing the data is being handled by systems of spreadsheets and access databases wrought with macros to turn them into functional applications. I'm asking you wise and experienced readers on your take if it's a better idea to continue to hire our third-party to convert these applications into the ERP system or hire internal developers to convert these applications to more scalable and practical applications that interface with the ERP (via API of choice)? We have a ton of spare capacity in data centers that formerly housed mainframes and local servers that now mostly run local Exchange and domain servers. We've consolidated these data centers into our co-location in Atlanta but the old data centers are still running, just empty. We definitely have the space to run commodity servers for an OpenStack, Eucalyptus, or some other private/hybrid cloud solution, but would this be counter productive to the goal of standardizing processes. Our CIO wants to dump everything into the ERP (creating a single point of failure to me) but our accountants are having a tough time chewing the additional costs of re-doing every departmental application. What are your experiences with such implementations?"
top

To build add-ons or to customize the ERP

yeshuawatso yeshuawatso writes  |  yesterday

yeshuawatso (1774190) writes "I work for one of the largest HVAC manufacturers in the world. We've currently spent millions of dollars investing in an ERP system from Oracle (via a third-party implementor and distributor) that handles most of our global operations, but it's been a great ordeal getting the thing to work for us across SBUs and even departments without having to constantly go back to the third-party, whom have their hands out asking for more money. What we've also discovered is that the ERP system is being used for inputting and retrieving data but not for managing the data. Managing the data is being handled by systems of spreadsheets and access databases wrought with macros to turn them into functional applications. I'm asking you wise and experienced readers on your take if it's a better idea to continue to hire our third-party to convert these applications into the ERP system or hire internal developers to convert these applications to more scalable and practical applications that interface with the ERP (via API of choice). We have a ton of spare capacity in data centers that formerly housed mainframes and local servers that now mostly run local Exchange and domain servers. We've consolidated these data centers into our co-location in Atlanta but the old data centers are still running, just empty. We definitely have the space to run commodity servers for an OpenStack, Eucalyptus, or some other private/hybrid cloud solution, but would this be counter productive to the goal of standardizing processes. Our CIO wants to dump everything into the ERP (creating a single point of failure to me) but our accountants are having a tough time chewing the additional costs of re-doing every departmental application. What are your experiences with such implementations?"
top

Woman sues Google for bad directions

yeshuawatso yeshuawatso writes  |  more than 4 years ago

yeshuawatso (1774190) writes "A woman has filed suit against Google for providing her faulty walking directions that led to her being hit by a vehicle.The woman used her Blackberry to get walking directions that led her to an area "not reasonably safe for pedestrians," according to the lawsuit. The woman is seeking $100,000 in damages for unspecified "severe" injuries and lost wages in addition to punitive damages. I guess no one taught her how to look both ways."
Link to Original Source
top

Android ported to the iPhone

yeshuawatso yeshuawatso writes  |  more than 4 years ago

yeshuawatso (1774190) writes "There seems to be nothing Android can't run on with a little work. planetbeing, from the iPhone Dev Team, has been working on getting Linux on the iPhone working for a while and now reports, with a video demonstration, Android running on the iPhone 2G. While not 100% bug free (like any software), the basics (touch, call, text, net) seems to be operational. No word on the accelerometer or GPS functioning but this is the first build. You can download the source here or here with instructions on getting your old jailbroken iPhone dual-booting Android."
Link to Original Source

Journals

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>