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Connecticut Groups Cancels Plan to Destroy Violent Games

yuna49 Re:now they can concentrate on ignoring mentally i (350 comments)

the next generation won't even ever have the guns we have

The youngest generation of Americans simply do not own guns at anywhere near the rates of prior generations. Grouping people in the NORC's General Social Survey by date of birth shows that gun ownership rates have fallen by an absolute 10% for each generation after what Pew Research calls the "Silents," people who became adults between 1946 and 1963. For the "Millennial" generation of people born after 1980, only about 20% report the presence of a gun in the household, down from 50% among the "Silents."

Personally I favor strict licensing provisions for gun ownership with background checks, testing, and liability insurance. It should be at least as difficult to own and use a gun as it is to own and drive a car.

about 2 years ago
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Windows Blue: Microsoft's Plan To Release a New Version of Windows Every Year

yuna49 Re:This is a good thing (712 comments)

As far as I can tell, the primary motivation for Windows 8 was to try and regain some traction in the mobile device market along with Microsoft's new best friend Nokia. This announcement reinforces my belief that Microsoft doesn't see the desktop as a profitable investment, nor thay they care as much about the enterprise as they did either. Then there is the Surface which could compete quite effectively in the tablet market and, with the detachable keyboard, in the netbook/laptop segment. In these markets direct sales to consumers are the driving force.

That leaves the question of where the enterprise will be heading over the next decade. Cloud services do not have much appeal; corporate data needs to be on internal servers. Most companies will stick with Windows, of course, but the opportunity for new entrants is opening up. I wouldn't be surprised to see Oracle start competing for desktops with an end-to-end solution based on its Sun servers, the Oracle database, and Oracle Linux on the desktop. Canonical is also focused on consumers, RedHat doesn't have the clout that Oracle does, and Novell is so 90's.

about 2 years ago
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Ad Blocking – a Coming Legal Battleground?

yuna49 Re:It's not the advertiser's right, but ... (686 comments)

As someone else who witnessed the NY Times attack, I will just reiterate my stance that no advertiser should ever permit advertising that includes scripts of any kind. Pictures and, though annoying, animated gifs are fine, but scripts should be banned.

about 2 years ago
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Ad Blocking – a Coming Legal Battleground?

yuna49 Re:It's not the advertiser's right, but ... (686 comments)

I'm going to guess it's the latter. Most people just don't care that much or don't know how easy it is to block ads. None of my less-than-technology-savvy friends install ABP or its equivalent unless I'm helping them set up their browsers.

about 2 years ago
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Tuition Should Be Lower For Science Majors, Says Florida Task Force

yuna49 Re:Just happy to see a Republican supporting scien (457 comments)

Bryn Mawr have been very generous with us. It's worth a shot.

My daughter wants to go to med school and maybe transition to public health later in her career. I'm not worried about her employment prospects. Bryn Mawr also does very well with students who intend to go for a Ph.D in the sciences. A few months back the Washington Monthly published a set of college ratings that use different criteria than USA Today does. Bryn Mawr turns out to be their top-ranked liberal arts college because of things like the generosity of its aid packages, the percentage of students going on for doctorates, and other measures like community service. I thought it might have scored in the top twenty or thirty schools, but I never expected to find it at the top of the list. Washington Monthly reported an average "net price" for Bryn Mawr of $19,316 after financial aid is factored in.

I also have a niece at McGill. Tuition for foreigners is a lot more than that $2,200 figure, but much less than tuition at an American private institution. The drawback is that foreign students don't receive financial aid. So it could be more expensive than an American school with an aid package, or less depending on what is offered.

more than 2 years ago
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Tuition Should Be Lower For Science Majors, Says Florida Task Force

yuna49 Re:Just happy to see a Republican supporting scien (457 comments)

My daughter is majoring in biology at Bryn Mawr, and the College has been quite generous to us. That seems true for many private institutions with reasonably-sized endowments. I'm surprised that [big expensive school] wasn't more generous. Is it all women? Single-sex womens' colleges are always on the lookout for talented young ladies.

more than 2 years ago
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Bill "The Science Guy" Nye Says Creationism Is Not Appropriate For Children

yuna49 Re:Yes! (1774 comments)

Nearly half of American adults believe humans were created out of whole cloth by God within the past 10,000 years, a figure that has hardly changed at all in over three decades. Belief in evolution without any guidance from God has risen from 9% in 1982 to a whopping 15% in 2012. When pastors and parents say one thing, and teachers say another, apparently what the teachers say falls on deaf ears.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/21814/evolution-creationism-intelligent-design.aspx

more than 2 years ago
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Is MySQL Slowly Turning Closed Source?

yuna49 Re:Just use Postgresql (336 comments)

Last I saw it had to be 'user'@'hostname'. Maybe that's no longer true, but if it still requires the quotes, then many new users will be puzzled why the command you gave doesn't work. It certainly looks like it should work.

PostgreSQL provides a simple command-line program "createuser".

I post frequently on Ubuntu Forums, and regardless of how hard or easy you (or I) may think using the GRANT command in the mysql command-line client might be, it doesn't seem that easy to naive users just starting out. Most of them have no idea that a command-line client even exists, much less how to use it to manage users. If they can't find what they need immediately in phpmyadmin, or something goes awry while installing Wordpress, they are lost.

more than 2 years ago
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Is MySQL Slowly Turning Closed Source?

yuna49 Re:Just use Postgresql (336 comments)

Other than importing data, why do you need a GUI tool at all? I've used PostgreSQL for fifteen years and managed everything I needed to do by entering SQL commands with the psql client. It forced me to learn about the intricacies of SQL syntax and become a more competent database administrator as a result.

When I started using PostgreSQL, MySQL was not available under a license that permitted free redistribution. As somone who was building servers for clients, that was a major obstacle. I started using PostgreSQL and never looked back. While MySQL was shuffled around among a variety of corporate owners, I just continued to use the one database I knew would always be well-supported and unencumbered, PostgreSQL. I've never regretted this decision.

Every time I have to deal with MySQL, I wonder why it is so popular. Even the simple task of creating and managing users is much more difficult with MySQL.

If you really must use a GUI tool, I prefer Microsoft Access with the PostgreSQL ODBC connector. I've tried OO Base a couple of times, but it still seems rather clunky.

more than 2 years ago
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Acer: Microsoft Surface 'Negative For The Whole PC Industry'

yuna49 Re:MS wants to destroy the Intel/AMD desktop PC (360 comments)

MS has not been able to beat linux in the server room. There's a lot of big bucks in corporate software.

You mean that server room running Linux Active Directory and Linux Exchange? There is a lot of big bucks in corporate software, and most of it still goes to Microsoft and its third-party developers. Companies might have their websites on Linux servers, but the desktop ecosystem at most organizations is still pretty much an MS preserve.

more than 2 years ago
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Acer: Microsoft Surface 'Negative For The Whole PC Industry'

yuna49 Re:Mass revolt against MS? (360 comments)

Do your parents use Photoshop? Their friends and relatives? When was the last time they bought a PC game for themselves at GameStop?

I see reasoning by anecdote way too often on this site. What percentage of people with home computers own a (legal or illegal) copy of Photoshop? I don't know the answer to that question, do you? A search of Google sure doesn't provide any insights.

more than 2 years ago
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Acer: Microsoft Surface 'Negative For The Whole PC Industry'

yuna49 Re:Mass revolt against MS? (360 comments)

Mozilla is an obvious anti-MS, Firefox was started in part to restore open standards on the web, IOW, to loosen IE's iron grip on the web.

Firefox is the direct descendant of Netscape which itself was built on the original NCSA Mosaic browser. Both Mosaic and Netscape pre-dated Internet Explorer by a year or more. They weren't created to "restore open standards on the web." Rather Internet Explorer was created to undermine open standards on the web and to extend Microsoft's hegemony on the desktop to the Internet. Thank goodness the early versions of IE were so pathetic in comparison to Netscape. Otherwise things might have evolved very differently.

more than 2 years ago
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European ISPs Ask ITU To Limit Net Neutrality

yuna49 Re:Why would you not want this? (120 comments)

My experience as a FiOS customer that uses both Amazon Instant and Hulu does not fit your description. I've not seen slow performance from either site. I don't find this surprising given that we're generally talking about 480p streams which aren't that bandwidth-intensive to begin with.
 

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Aren't You Running KDE?

yuna49 Re:Pretty damn simple (818 comments)

I'm assuming when you talk about "running a movie from a network drive" you're using SMB filesharing. Try running mplayer from the command prompt with an SMB-shared video, and you'll see the same result.

The solution? Use NFS. Videos shared with NFS to mplayer-based players like SMPlayer just play when opened. If you have to share with both Windows and Linux users, build a Linux file server with support for both NFS and SMB.

I don't think this is a KDE issue at all.

more than 2 years ago
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Americans More Worried About Cybersecurity Than Terrorism

yuna49 Show me the questionnaire (266 comments)

I don't trust executive summaries of polling data; I want to see the entire questionnaire so I can understand the context in which the questions were asked. I'd bet that if people were asked an open-ended question about the "problems facing our country today" cyberterrorism would be lucky to get a 1% response. Here are the top items from the most recent New York Times/CBS poll released yesterday:

Economy and jobs 62%
Federal budget deficit 11
Health care 9
Same-sex marriage 7
Foreign policy 4
Immigration 2
Other/DK 4

I don't see terrorism of any sort on that list.

Even if we accept the findings of the survey, what is most striking in the results is the substantial increase in respondents who say they are "not concerned" about the threats asked about compared to a year ago.

Moreover at least one question has nothing to do with IT, the one about respondents' ability to "meet essential financial obligations." For more relevant questions, solid majorities report being only "somewhat" or "not concerned" about the security of online shopping and banking, computer viruses and spam email, and their own personal security.

The IT media has a habit of touting these self-serving studies by organizations like, in this case, Unisys as somehow providing an "objective" view of public opinion. Puh-leeze.

more than 2 years ago
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Adobe Releases Last Linux Version of Flash Player

yuna49 Why I don't read Slashdot any more (426 comments)

This thread is a good example of the bubble in which Slashdot readers now seem to reside. Outside of the bubble millions of people use Flash every day to watch videos on thousands of web sites. Inside the bubble we have dozens of postings about how awful Flash is and why you don't use it.

Well, guess what? That's why the fringes of the open-source movement have become progressively less relevant over the years. I've been a Linux user since 1994 and will continue to use it in the future. That said, it's ridiculous to assume that people running Linux won't want to visit sites like Hulu. I turned off Flash, installed flashvideoreplacer, and had no success at sites like Hulu or Crunchyroll. I could get flashvideoreplacer to launch smplayer when I visited YouTube, but it failed miserably with Hulu.

Call me when the entire Internet has converted to HTML5. I'll check back then.

more than 2 years ago
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Adobe Releases Last Linux Version of Flash Player

yuna49 Re:Replace flash now (426 comments)

No Hulu, no go.

more than 2 years ago
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Adobe Releases Last Linux Version of Flash Player

yuna49 Re:Time to celebrate... (426 comments)

Who is the "we" here? Developers or end-users? As one of the latter who watches Flash videos on a subscription site (Crunchyroll), what would you suggest I do if they move to Flash 12? Give up my subscription? Use Windows or Google Chrome?

You all may hate Flash, but it remains the most widely-used cross-platform method for distributing video. Someday everything will be using HTML5, but that day isn't happening any time soon. In the meantime, Linux users may or may not be able to watch video on the thousands of web sites that use Flash today. Certainly if I were running a site that uses Flash for videos, I wouldn't be spending money converting to HTML5 just to support a few Linux users.

more than 2 years ago
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Software Patents Not So Abstract When the Lawsuits Hit Home

yuna49 Re:open source? (180 comments)

You've posted this same claim at least half-a-dozen times now. Enough, already.

more than 2 years ago
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Software Patents Not So Abstract When the Lawsuits Hit Home

yuna49 Re:Bit more info (180 comments)

Given that patents have a seventeen-year term, a patent from 1992 should have expired by now.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Microsoft to provide search results for Baidu

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "Microsoft will provide English-language search services for Chinese search giant Baidu. I presume MS has agreed to comply with whatever censorship the Chinese government requires. Despite, or perhaps because of, Google's tiff with the government over censorship, it remains the second-largest search engine in China, a position Microsoft apparently envies."
Link to Original Source
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EU Carbon Permits stolen from computer exchanges

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "The European Union has halted trading of the carbon permits that underpins its new system to combat global warming. While creating a virtual marketplace to exchange pollution credits may make theoretical sense, its implementation may be straining the abilities of the EU's member governments. The system delegates the tracking of permits to the individual member countries rather than centralizing them under the purview of Brussels. Thieves exploited vulnerabilities in the systems operated by the Czech Republic and Austria. In the Czech case, a bomb threat emptied the building housing the exchange and enabled hackers to break into the system and conduct illegal trades."
Link to Original Source
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Stuxnet worm may have targeted Iranian reactor

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "PCWorld reports that analysis of the Stuxnet worm suggests its target might have been Iran's nuclear program. "Last week Ralph Langner, a well-respected expert on industrial systems security, published an analysis of the Stuxnet worm, which targets Siemens software systems, and suggested that it may have been used to sabotage Iran's Bushehr nuclear reactor. A Siemens expert, Langner simulated a Siemens industrial network and then analyzed the worm's attack. Experts had first thought that Stuxnet was written to steal industrial secrets, but Langner found something quite different. The worm actually looks for very specific Siemens settings — a kind of fingerprint that tells it that it has been installed on a very specific Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) device — and then it injects its own code into that system.

Stuxnet makes changes to a piece of Siemens code called Organizational Block 35. This Siemens component monitors critical factory operations — things that need a response within 100 milliseconds. By messing with Operational Block 35, Stuxnet could easily cause a refinery's centrifuge to malfunction, but it could be used to hit other targets too, Byres said. "The only thing I can say is that it is something designed to go bang," he said."

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Oracle profits up 20%, outpacing industry

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "Ashlee Vance at the New York Times reports, "Oracle posted better-than-expected results for its first quarter on the back of strong sales of new software products and higher maintenance and support revenue. Wall Street analysts praised the company for turning in such results for a quarter that closed at the end of August, traditionally one of the slowest selling periods. Oracle’s performance also provided a bright spot for the business computing sector, which has produced a mixed bag of results in recent weeks. ""
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NY Times Identifies Origin of Malware Ad

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "As reported here on Slashdot, over the weekend the New York Times distributed an ad that redirected browsers to a page designed to induce installation of a trojan posing as a phony antivirus tool. This morning the Times identified the process by which this ad appeared on its pages. Diane McNulty, a spokeswoman for the company, said in a statement in response to questions about the rogue ads, "The culprit masqueraded as a national advertiser and provided seemingly legitimate product advertising for a week. Over the weekend, the ad being served up was switched so that an intrusive message, claiming to be a virus warning from the reader’s computer, appeared."

I hope this unfortunate incident will make site owners more aware of their responsibilities in redistributing third-party content. In particular, no ad should ever be permitted to include scripting code."

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Does your college or university support Linux?

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "Lately I have been visiting colleges with my daughter who's a senior in high school. Every school has proudly announced that they support both Windows and Macs, and most of these schools report having about a 50-50 split between the two technologies. However we've been a Linux household for many years now, and my daughter routinely uses a laptop running Kubuntu 9.04. Sometimes I would ask the student tour guide if Linux was supported and was usually met with a blank stare. We're obviously not concerned about whether she can write papers using OpenOffice and Linux. Rather we've been wondering about using other computing services on campus like classroom applications, remote printing, VPNs, or wifi support (nearly all these campuses have ubiquitous wifi). Given the composition of Slashdot's readership, I thought I'd pose the question here. Does your school support Linux? Have you found it difficult or impossible to use Linux in concert with the school's computing services?"
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Georgian academic target of Twitter DDOS Attack

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "The New York Times reports today that the denial-of-service attacks on Twitter and other social networking sites this week were designed to block access to pages maintained by an economist in the republic of Georgia. According to the Times's reporters, "The blitz was an attempt to block the professor's Web pages, where he was revisiting the events leading up to the brief territorial war between Russia and Georgia that began a year ago." Along with the denial-of-service attack, the economist's blog handle was used as the sender address in a "joe-job" spam attack in an attempt to defame him."
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Court IP addresses not "personally identifiabl

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "Online Media Daily reports that a federal judge in Seattle has held that IP addresses are not personal information. "In order for 'personally identifiable information' to be personally identifiable, it must identify a person. But an IP address identifies a computer," U.S. District Court Judge Richard Jones said in a written decision. Jones issued the ruling in the context of a class-action lawsuit brought by consumers against Microsoft stemming from an update that automatically installed new anti-piracy software. In that case, which dates back to 2006, consumers alleged that Microsoft violated its user agreement by collecting IP addresses in the course of the updates.

This ruling flatly contradicts a recent EU decision to the contrary, as well as other cases in the US. Its potential relevance to the RIAA suits should be obvious to anyone who reads Slashdot."

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Teen strip-search ruled unconstitutional

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "The US Supreme Court today ruled 8-1 that the strip search of a 13-year-old girl by officials in an Arizona middle school was unconstitutional. However, by a vote of 7-2, the Court also ruled that the individual school officials could not be held personally liable. A suit for damages against the school district itself is still going forward. We discussed this case at length back in March when the Court decided to hear the case on appeal."
Link to Original Source
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Intel, Nokia Announce Technology Collaboration

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "BBC News reports that, "The world's largest chip maker has teamed up with the world's largest mobile phone maker to create what they say will be a 'new exciting industry'. Intel and Nokia said their 'technology collaboration' would deliver new mobile computing products — beyond existing smartphones, netbooks and notebooks." The partnership will center around several open-source mobile Linux software projects, including the Moblin platform for Atom-based processors and the Maemo operating system developed by Nokia. Intel will also acquire a licence from Nokia that is used in modem chips to connect to third generation cellular networks. In an interview with the BBC, Gerry Purdy, chief mobile analyst at Frost & Sullivan, said that while the first product could be a year or so away, it should have the potential to shake up the market. "I believe this will impact the industry for many years to come and accelerate the adoption of smartphones in the world. At the moment they are at 10% of market share. I predict that will grow to 50-60% in the next five years as a result of this partnership.""
Link to Original Source
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New anti-piracy law cuts Swedish traffic by 1/3

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "The BBC reports/a> that Internet traffic in Sweden may have fallen by 33% after a new anti-piracy law came into effect,

From the article: "Sweden's new policy, which is based on the European Union's Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement Directive (IPRED), allows copyright holders to obtain a court order forcing ISPs to provide the IP addresses identifying which computers have been sharing copyrighted material

"Figures from Netnod, a Swedish firm that measures internet traffic in and out of the country, suggest traffic fell from an average of 120Gbps to 80Gbps on the day the new law came into effect.

"Speaking to the BBC, Christian Engstrom, vice-chairman of the Swedish Pirate Party — said the drop in traffic was a direct result of the new law, but that it would only be a temporary fall."

Netnod appears to provide peering services in Sweden so they'd be well-positioned to measure the traffic. Unfortunately a cursory search of Netnod's website fails to bring up any evidence substantiating the BBC's story. If it's there, it's not being advertised."

Link to Original Source
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MIT student gets probation for "hoax device

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "Last fall, MIT student Star Simpson was arrested at gunpoint when she wore a breadboard with blinking LEDs to Boston's Logan Airport. Today she was sentenced to a year of probation for "disorderly conduct" and required to spend fifty hours in community service. The more serious, and more controversial, charge of displaying a "hoax device" was dropped by the prosecution. I'm disappointed but not surprised that the hoax-device charge was not prosecuted because the premise on which the charge was based raises serious freedom of expression issues that now won't be heard in a court of law."
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Do "Anti-Hacking" Laws Cover "Cyberbul

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "Federal prosecutors in Los Angeles brought an indictment this week against a woman in Missouri for alleged cyberbullying. (Text of indictment here) The indictment includes a novel extension of the laws prohibiting hacking attempts against so-called "protected" computers, defined as any computer used in interstate commerce. The prosecutors argue that registering falsely as a teen-aged boy on MySpace and then using the service to harass a teen-aged girl constitutes accessing a protected computer to further a "tortious act." (The girl in question later committed suicide, but the local prosecutors in Missouri chose not to indict anyone in the case because they felt that no state laws were broken.)

While the case itself is certainly tragic, it does raise important questions about freedom of speech and protection of anonymity. Should it be a Federal crime to enter false information at sites like MySpace if you agree to Terms of Service which forbid such falsehoods? Doesn't this approach extend Federal protections to what are fundamentally private contracts between website operators and their users?"
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Domains blocked by US Treasury "blacklist"

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "Adam Liptak of the New York Times reports today about the plight of a Spanish tour operator whose domain names have been embargoed by eNom after they discovered the tour operator's name on a US Treasury blacklist. It turns out he packages tours to Cuba largely for European tourists who can legally travel there, unlike Americans. The article cites "a press release issued in December 2004, almost three years before eNom acted. It said Mr. Marshall's company had helped Americans evade restrictions on travel to Cuba and was 'a generator of resources that the Cuban regime uses to oppress its people.' It added that American companies must not only stop doing business with the company but also freeze its assets, meaning that eNom did exactly what it was legally required to do."

The only part of the operator's business in the United States is his domain name registration; all other aspects of his business lie outside the United States."

Link to Original Source
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Can the Internet ever be "safe" for kids?

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "ars technica writer Jacqui Cheng reports that Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society will join with MySpace, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo! in an effort to develop tools to protect the safety of children using the Internet. One focus will be on methods for age verification. Is age verification as hopeless a task as it seems to this observer, or can the combined technological wisdom of Slashdot suggest some solutions for the general problem of identifying who's an adult and who's a child on the Internet? Even if we could make this distinction reliably, would that help us make children "safer?" Is there really anything this coalition of worthies can do, or are they just trying to reduce the pressures they're getting from the "think-of-the-children" groups?"
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Telcos to get retroactive immunity for wiretaps?

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "The New York Times reports today that both Houses of Congress are considering legislation to extend the temporary eavesdropping authority granted to the NSA last August. The version of the bill circulating in the Senate currently includes the White House's proposal that the telecommunications companies that cooperated in the wiretapping be granted immunity from prosecution for these actions both in the future, and more importantly, retroactively as well."
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Microsoft .NET patch makes PCs go "haywire"

yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "Various people are reporting that the MS07-040 patch for .NET released on Tuesday can cause a variety of seemingly unrelated problems. According to the SANS Internet Storm Center "the reports we got so far seem not to lead to any specific thing that happens in many cases, just various things going haywire." Some commentators on The Register's report of this story indicate that the patch failed to install at all, while others report things like the mouse suddenly failing to work or long periods of hard drive thrashing. In some cases a hard reboot seems to fix the problem, but other reports suggest that a reinstallation of the .NET framework itself is required. The problems may be related to the MSCORSVW.EXE process which recompiles all the .NET assemblies when the patch is downloaded. While the recompilations are supposed to run as a background task, in some instances the recompilation will drive the processor to 100% usage."
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yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "Declan McCullagh reports that US Attorney General Gonzales announced this week that the Bush Administration will support the proposed "Intellectual Property Protection Act of 2007." Among other draconian features, the Act would make "attempting to infringe copyright" a act punishable by up to ten years in prison. Jail time features predominantly in this act including life imprisonment for "anyone using counterfeit products who 'recklessly causes or attempts to cause death....' Justice Department officials gave the example of a hospital using pirated software instead of paying for it." Even more bizarre is a provision that would require the Department of Homeland Security to alert the Recording Industry Association of America if they discover an attempt to import CDs with "unauthorized fixations of the sounds, or sounds and images, of a live musical performance." Only the RIAA enjoys this privileged status; even the Motion Picture Association of America wouldn't qualify."
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yuna49 yuna49 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

yuna49 (905461) writes "eWeek reports that "some of the changes in the upcoming release of Windows Server 2008 are a response to features and performance advantages that have made Linux an attractive option to Microsoft customers." The article cites Linux's smaller "surface area," which appears to mean having fewer exposed services and open ports. In addition, it appears that Windows Server 2008 will run without a GUI, as do many Linux servers now. Other areas where Microsoft is playing catch-up include clustering and web-serving.

However Linux, with Xen, appears to be less of a threat in the virtualization arena. According to the general manager of Windows server division, "We can tell which hypervisor they are running on and to be honest, I see zero on Linux. We see VMware rather than Xen because it's not really out there in production versions of Red Hat and SUSE. But the long-term issue around virtualization will be who had the best management tools.""

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