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Wolfram Promises Computing That Answers Questions

zero_offset Re:New Kind of Science? (369 comments)

You may have also noticed he operates a business by that name. Crazy, I know!

more than 5 years ago
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Wolfram Promises Computing That Answers Questions

zero_offset Re:Seen this before? (369 comments)

Not even close. I asked it for the population of a nearby county and the answer was something like "Hopefully this page can answer your question:" with a link to the Wikipedia page about that county. Click on the link explaining how Start works and you'll see that even they don't pretend that it's really the same thing. The emphasis with Start is on parsing Natural Language Queries, period.

more than 5 years ago
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Jackson Slated to Make Hobbit Movie, Sequel

zero_offset Re:sequel? (496 comments)

Documentary based on the Silmarillion

Now that is a brilliant idea.


Oh god, no... are you insane? The Silmarillion was like the Old Testament "Numbers" but for people who fantasize about fucking elves. And yeah, "fucking" is a verb in that sentence. "And Elbereth begat Dorkagar who begat Losermir and Choadalwyn, and Choadalwyn began Unwashedereth who did dewll in his mother's basement."

about 7 years ago

Submissions

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zero_offset zero_offset writes  |  more than 7 years ago

zero_offset (200586) writes "A certain sector of the geek world is into cars and motorcycles, and what could be more newsworthy and exciting than a whole new layout for the internal combustion engine? The NEVIS Engine Company has taken on a task that The Red Herring describes as downright Sisyphean: reinventing the venerable internal combustion engine to dramatically improve efficiency and reduce emissions. We've heard that claim before, but this engine, using the new "Bortone cycle," is a complete re-think of the typical four-stroke piston-in-cylinder internal combustion process. They are claiming twice the efficiency of a standard Otto cycle engine. Their prototype is producing 250 HP at 2000 RPM from a 1 liter 2-cylinder setup, so yes, it runs. A detailed description is available on the Technology Overview page, but be sure to hit their images page and step through the pictures in order: watching the person assemble the engine step-by-step helps clarify how it works."
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zero_offset zero_offset writes  |  more than 7 years ago

zero_offset (200586) writes "The Tokyo Institute of Technology has announced a process for creating an inexpensive, nearly transparent, electrically conductive alumina cement, reports Pink Tentacle, a blog that focuses on a broad range of interesting news from Japan. Conductivity is comparable to metal, and the transparency should be adequate for use in display panels. The process relies upon commonplace and inexpensive metals compared to the rare metals such as iridium currently used in display panels. (This is probably useful in many other ways, but slashdot's section/topic choices for articles are somewhat arbitrary and limited.) The blog links to several Japanese-language articles which have defied all my attempts to translate them."
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zero_offset zero_offset writes  |  more than 7 years ago

zero_offset (200586) writes "Over the past few days many sources (for example, InformationWeek) have been reporting that a Canadian company named D-Wave Systems announced that tomorrow, February 13th, they'll demonstrate a commercially-available 16-qubit quantum computer. The founder and CTO states, "It doesn't do any kind of communications or cryptographic applications, but instead solves multivariable, combinatorial problems on our own supercooled quantum computer." Other sources are reporting that companies such as IBM are skeptical. Based on a 2005 article in Technology Review which stated they were looking at a 3-year timeline, it would appear they're ahead of schedule."
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zero_offset zero_offset writes  |  more than 8 years ago

zero_offset (200586) writes "A device called On Time, designed and sold by Payment Protection Systems, is designed to disable a car's ignition system if the buyer misses the loan payment due-date. Several days leading up to the due-date, numeric indicators light up to warn the driver that the deadline is approaching. The company also offers a GPS-locator option. Apparently the On Time device has been in production since 1999. It is primarily marketed to used car dealerships who cater to higher-credit-risk buyers. The device has appeared in the news several times in the past year (for example, stories in Billings Gazette, St. Petersburg Times, and The Arizona Republic), suggesting its popularity with dealers is on the rise. The part which caught my attention was this: despite the relative simplicity of vehicle ignition systems, the PPS website claims that removal of the device is "virtually impossible," but other than citing a mysterious wireless signal sent from an "untraceable location" there is no further explanation of how it actually works.

(p.s. Slashdot really needs an "Automotive" section or topic.)"

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