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Comment Re:NEW IS BAD (Score 1) 265

Two Statements:
Ship owners are realizing bigger ships aren't better than smaller ships
Ship owners continue to prefer to buy bigger ships rather than smaller ships.

Consumers are realizing that energy drinks are bad for your health.
Consumers continue to prefer to buy more and more energy drinks rather than getting a good night's sleep.

Assuming we are talking about the same "ship owners", one of these two statements isn't true.

Even given your assumption, that's not true. It's called "cognitive dissonance"

One of them is an empirical statement which demonstrates ship owner revealed actual preferences and the other one is a quote from the piece's author which seems inline with their own expressed opinion about bigger ship=bad. Which one do you think is more likely to be accurate?

Again - not an issue. They can both be true.

The more you personally know about the details of a media story, usually the less accurate you'll think the story is.

And that statement is ABSOLUTELY true. You just chose a bad example.

This also applies to media stories you don't know as much about, just many people don't realize it when it's not slapping them in the face.

If possible, this is even more true than your last statement.

Comment Re:Link to Location for Reading (Score 0) 742

Specifically, Assange revealed the leaked emails show that she overrode the Pentagon's reluctance to overthrow sovereign Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, and that "they predicted the post-war outcome would be what it is, which is ISIS taking over the country."

Maybe I'm wrong, but as far as I know, ISIS didn't really exist before 2003 - so how would the Pentagon have been worried about them pre-2011?

Comment Re: Consequences (Score 1) 168

This would be issuance of a passport pursuant to rendering him to arrest, to permit him to legally enter the US under custody. And quite within the powers of the government to do.

If he has a passport, he can go where ever the hell he wants - for example, to finish his long-delayed trip to South America. That's kinda/sorta the entire purpose of a passport. If it's just a matter of giving himself up, all he needs to do is show up at the American Embassy.

In law, rendition is a "surrender" or "handing over" of persons or property, particularly from one jurisdiction to another. For criminal suspects, extradition is the most common type of rendition. Rendition can also be seen as the act of handing over, after the request for extradition has taken place.

Read your own quote. Traveling OF HIS OWN FREE WILL to the US, to face charges or for any other reason, is not rendition.

Also from Wikipedia, the disambiguation page:

Rendition (law), a legal term meaning "handing over"

If he's traveling OF HIS OWN FREE WILL, he is not being "handed over". He's surrendering. Different thing.

Extraordinary rendition, the apprehension and extrajudicial transfer of a person from one nation to another

Again - if traveling OF HIS OWN FREE WILL, there is no "apprehension" involved, and is not an extrajudicial transfer.

You see, you're missing something very basic. If he's been arrested ("apprehended"), he DOESN'T NEED A PASSPORT. If it's an "extraordinary rendition" (read illegal, read kidnapping), HE DOESN'T NEED A PASSPORT.

Any conversation that involves "get a passport and come back to face the consequences" is a non-starter - he HAD a passport, and the US government revoked it. It's on THEM, not him; they are the ones that caused the problem in the first place - THEY are the ones that removed that option from the table, no Snowden.

Comment Re:Consequences (Score 1) 168

He needs to get lawyers, come on back, and decide, see what he wants to do: Go to trial, try to cut a deal. I think there has to be a consequence for what he has done."

Except he can't come back, even if he wanted to. You lot cancelled his passport - that's why/how he got stranded in Russia in the first place.

Don't stand there and spout crap about how he should do the right thing when you're the reason that option literally doesn't even exist for him.

Submission + - Japanese Government decides to recycle contaminated waste from Fukushima

AppleHoshi writes: Friends of the Earth in Japan are reporting that the Ministry of the Environment quietly introduced a proposal on March 30th to re-use soil contaminated with radioactivity from the Fukushima meltdown for public works projects across Japan. The recycled soil will be limited to that with a radiation level of less than 8,000 Becquerels per kilogram, a mere eighty times the pre-Fukushima legal limit for such waste.
While residents of Japan are obviously worried about the long term effects it's also worth noting that some of the biggest "public works" projects lined up for the next four years are directly related to the infrastructure for the 2020 Olympics.

Submission + - Lockheed Still Supporting Portable Nuclear Generator (

mdsolar writes: Lockheed Martin continues to invest in its portable nuclear fusion generator, with that investment recently entering a more advanced stage, according to the head of the company’s Skunk Works division.

Rob Weiss told an audience at the Atlantic Council that Lockheed is “about four months into a little bit more significant investment” into the technology, which was first revealed around two years ago.
At the time of the initial announcement, Lockheed said it was aiming for a 100 megawatt device which could fit on the back of a large truck. Such a reactor, the company claims, could power a city of up to 100,000 people.
Such a technology would be a revolutionary one for an ever energy-dependent country, but would also potentially have major military applications. If the system could be further shrunk, it could potentially become a powerplant for fighter jets, providing the power needed for directed energy weapons and advanced sensors. It could also help power travel for spacecraft.

Submission + - Nest is about to deliberately break one of its own products.

CanadianMacFan writes: From the article on Vox:
Nest is a Silicon Valley company that makes a widely praised home thermostat — I wrote about the device last year. Google acquired the company in 2014. And not long after that, Nest acquired a company called Revolv that sold a hub allowing customers to electronically control the lights in their homes.

Nest wasn't really interested in Revolv's hub, though. Instead, it wanted to get its hands on Revolv's talented engineers and reassign them work on other Nest projects. Revolv stopped selling its hub at the time of the acquisition in October 2014.

Now Arlo Gilbert notes an announcement on Revolv's home page: "As of May 15, 2016, Revolv service will no longer be available. The Revolv app won’t open and the hub won’t work."

Nest isn't just going to stop providing software updates or security fixes for the Revolv hub. It's going to deliberately make these devices totally useless. If you made the mistake of buying a Revolv hub to control lights in your house, you're going to have to buy a replacement device or else you'll no longer be able to control your lights from your smartphone, and — depending on how things are set up — you might not be able to turn them on at all.

Submission + - China Censors Online Discussion About Panama Papers (

An anonymous reader writes: China appears to be censoring social media posts on the Panama Papers document leak which has named several members of China's elite, including President Xi Jinping's brother-in-law. Hundreds of posts on networks such as Sina Weibo and Wechat on the topic have been deleted since Monday morning. According to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), the Panama Papers show that Mr Deng acquired two offshore companies in 2009, at a time when Mr Xi was rising in politics. State media appeared to black out the news. But many on microblogging network Sina Weibo and mobile chat network Wechat were discussing the topic on Monday morning, sharing Chinese translations of details of the story, including information on Mr Deng. A hashtag created on the topic quickly trended. Checks by the BBC found that by the end of the day many of those posts had disappeared, with at least 481 discussions deleted from the hashtag's Weibo topic page, and other posts shared on Wechat also deleted. The website, which actively tracks censorship on Weibo, listed "Panama" as the second-most censored term on the network.

Submission + - Flaw In HID Door Controllers Lets Attackers Unlock Doors, Deactivate Alarms

An anonymous reader writes: Trend Micro researcher Ricky Lawshae has unearthed a critical vulnerability in HID’s VertX and Edge door controllers. Exploiting the flaw is easy, and could result in attackers gaining complete control of the device, meaning they could unlock doors and switch off alarms controlled through it. HID’s access control systems are ubiquitous, and keep unwanted individuals out of many rooms and spaces in a huge number of office buildings, government complexes, hospitals, aeroports, etc. These vulnerable devices are part of those systems: the controllers check the information sent by the card readers once an access card is swiped through them, and control all the functions of the door.

Submission + - Mosaic, Netscape, and What Happened at the Beginning of the Web (

An anonymous reader writes: In a long standing tradition, the IEEE has lost another interview with one of the pioneers of our industry. Marc Andreesen, one of the creators of NCSA Mosaic and a founder of Netscape, gives us his honest views on the creation of HTML and CSS. "I took inspiration from Bjarne Stroustrup," he says.

Submission + - CloudFlare aims to block fewer legitimate Tor users (

SpacemanukBEJY.53u writes: CloudFlare said it is working on ways to stop Tor users from seeing so many CAPTCHAs when browsing the Web. CloudFlare's popular content delivery network is used by many websites to stop abusive behavior such as denial-of-service attacks and spam. But since Tor exit nodes are often associated with bad behavior, the effect is many legitimate Tor users face a terrible browsing experience and are constantly presented with CAPTCHAs. CloudFlare has a few ideas for how to make it better, some of which would require cooperation from The Tor Project.

Submission + - Reddit removes warrant canary, probably served with a secret court order (

AmiMoJo writes: Reddit has removed the warrant canary posted on its website, suggesting that the company may have been served with some sort of secret court order or document for user information. At the bottom of its 2014 transparency report, the company wrote: "As of January 29, 2015, reddit has never received a National Security Letter, an order under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or any other classified request for user information. If we ever receive such a request, we would seek to let the public know it existed." That language was conspicuously missing from the 2015 transparency report that was published Thursday morning. CEO Steve Huffman wrote: "I've been advised not to say anything one way or the other."

Submission + - ESA is asking to mine data from Mars Express telemetry to prolong its life (

Dario Izzo writes: The Mars Express spacecraft from ESA has been orbiting the Red Planet for 12 years. While its controllers know the spacecraft inside out, additional insights are hidden within the mounds of telemetry the mission generates – inspiring the first of ESA’s new data mining competitions: the Mars Express Power Challenge. The goal is to use machine learning techniques to predict Mars Express’s thermal power consumption during the martian year ahead, based on its past telemetry. ESA is targeting the international data mining and machine learning community – including students, research groups or companies”. The website Kelvins is hosting the competition.

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